Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘announcement of judgement’ Category

GO TO PART X

I. What a Prophet is and does

a. What a prophet is

i. A prophet is an office that God calls an individual to; usually he is called in a supernatural event of a Divine Confrontation of some sort.[1]

ii.      “God enables prophets to speak and act as he desires.”[2]

iii.      He is a representative of God.[3]

iv.      “The biblical terminology used for the prophets indicates that they ‘see’ things usually not perceived by others.”[4]

v.      A Prophet lives a exemplary moral life (1Samuel 12:3-5), unlike false prophets (Isaiah 28: 7-8; Jeremiah 23:10-14).[5]

b. What a prophet does

i.      He represents God.

ii.      He is a spokesperson for God.[6]  Thus, he utters God’s Word.

iii.      “The prophets were covenant enforcement mediators.”[7]

iv.      Prophecy was written and spoken at the same time[8]

1. He verbally communicates his message.[9]

2. It was written down: Isaiah 8:1, 16; 30:8; Jeremiah 36:2; 51:60; Ezekiel 2:9-10; 43:11-12; Habakkuk 2:2

3. Why did prophets write down their material?

a. “Given that understanding of the eternal significance of the divine Word, we should expect the prophets to commit their words to writing.”[10]

b. Vindicate the truth of the Prophet’s message.[11]

II. Identifying Announcement of Judgment

a. Definition

i.      Announcement of Judgment were messages of the prophets which warns the people about God’s judgment.

ii.      It serves as a rebuke to the people from Yahweh himself.

b. Elements within an Announcement of Judgment[12]

i.      An accusation

1. This shows what it is that God is accusing the people of.

2. It is the sin that the Prophet is pointing out to the people.

ii.      An announcement

1. The announcement is usually in the second person.[13]

2. This shows what God will do if the people will not repent.

c. Forms of Announcement of Judgment

i.      Prophecy of disaster

Elements[14]

a. Diatribe- Indication of the situation.

b. Threat- Prediction of disaster.

c. Including characterization- Something about the messenger or the hearer.

ii. Woe oracle

a.      “ ‘Woe’ was the word ancient Israelites cried out when facing disaster or death, or when they mourned at a funeral…no Israelite could miss the significance of the use of that word.”[15]

b. Elements[16]

i.      Exclamation of dismay introduced by woe or alas.

ii.      Participle describing wrongful action or noun giving a negative characterization of the people.

iii. Prophetic lawsuit

a. A legal motif.

b.      “God is portrayed imaginatively as the plaintiff, prosecuting attorney, judge and bailiff in a court case against the defendant, Israel.”[17]

c. Elements[18]

i.      Introduction- “Calling audience to hear and often appealing to heavens and earth as witnesses.”[19]

ii.      Statement of accusation

iii.      Prosecuting attorney’s address

iv.      “Description of the inability of cultic ritual to atone for such wrong acts”[20]

v.      Warning- Calling the listeners to turn back to God and obey Him.

III. Principles in interpretation

a. Prophetic literature is largely poetic, and hermeneutical principles for poetry applies here too.

i.      “God spoke through his prophets largely by poems…”[21]

ii.      Therefore, all the principles in Session Six concerning parallelism apply here as well.

b. If possible, try to identify the specific historical situation from other area in Scripture.[22]

In the amazing flow of the Bible’s diversity (various genres) and unity (the inter-dependence of the various genre), narratives and historical narratives in the Bible are helpful in this regard.  This will enrich one’s interpretation.

c. Identify the elements within the text.

Consciously identifying elements as listed earlier will help strengthen one’s interpretation of clauses and sentences.

d. Identify the sins which the people were rebuked for.

Pay attention to what sins God grieved over, and practically how this address us today if we have similar sins.

e. Remember the Covenants, the Covenants that are antecedent to the Prophetic text.

i.      Remember as stated earlier, prophets are covenantal enforcers.

ii.      In yet another beautiful illustration of how the Bible can interpret the Bible itself through various modes of Genre and the interplay of genres, the Law genre and narrative texts which stipulate the conditions of the Covenants are important background information to keep in mind when approaching announcement of judgment.


[1] Michael J. Williams, The Prophet and His Message, (Phillipsburg, New Jersey: Presbyterian and Reformed), 54-55.

[2] Ibid, 70.

[3] Ibid, 71.

[4] Ibid, 69.

[5] Ibid, 67-68,

[6] Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart., How to Read the Bible for All its Worth, (Grand Rapids: Zondervan), 166.

[7] Ibid, 167.

[8] C. Hassell Bullock, An Introduction to the Old Testament Prophetic Books, (Chicago: Moody Press), 33.

[9] Michael J. Williams, The Prophet and His Message, (Phillipsburg, New Jersey: Presbyterian and Reformed), 74-75

[10] C. Hassell Bullock, An Introduction to the Old Testament Prophetic Books, (Chicago: Moody Press), 32.

[11] Ibid.

[12] Trent C. Butler, “Announcement of Judgment” Cracking Old Testament Codes, (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House Company), 160.

[13] Ibid, 162.

[14] Ibid.

[15] Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart., How to Read the Bible for All its Worth, (Grand Rapids: Zondervan), 178.

[16] Trent C. Butler, “Announcement of Judgment” Cracking Old Testament Codes, (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House Company), 163.

[17] Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart., How to Read the Bible for All its Worth, (Grand Rapids: Zondervan), 177-8.

[18] Trent C. Butler, “Announcement of Judgment” Cracking Old Testament Codes, (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House Company), 163.

[19] Ibid.

[20] Ibid.

[21] Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart., How to Read the Bible for All its Worth, (Grand Rapids: Zondervan), 179-180.

[22] Trent C. Butler, “Announcement of Judgment” Cracking Old Testament Codes, (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House Company), 166.

GO TO PART XII

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 738 other followers