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For today’s post we will tackle the question the Skeptic Annotated Bible asked: Did Jesus forewarn the apostles of His death and resurrection?

Here are the two answers which the skeptic believes shows a Bible contradiction:

Yes, He did.

““Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem; and the Son of Man will be delivered to the chief priests and scribes, and they will condemn Him to death, 19 and will hand Him over to the Gentiles to mock and scourge and crucify Him, and on the third day He will be raised up.”” (Matthew 20:18-19)

“When Jesus had finished all these words, He said to His disciples, 2 “You know that after two days the Passover is coming, and the Son of Man is to be handed over for crucifixion.”” (Matthew 26:1-2)

“Then Jesus *said to them, “You will all fall away because of Me this night, for it is written, ‘I will strike down the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered.’ 32 But after I have been raised, I will go ahead of you to Galilee.”” (Matthew 26:31-32)

“And He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again.” (Mark 8:31)

“saying, “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be delivered to the chief priests and the scribes; and they will condemn Him to death and will hand Him over to the Gentiles. 34 They will mock Him and spit on Him, and scourge Him and kill Him, and three days later He will rise again.”” (Mark 10:33-34)

“But after I have been raised, I will go ahead of you to Galilee.”” (Mark 14:28)

“Then He took the twelve aside and said to them, “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and all things which are written through the prophets about the Son of Man will be accomplished. 32 For He will be handed over to the Gentiles, and will be mocked and mistreated and spit upon, 33 and after they have scourged Him, they will kill Him; and the third day He will rise again.”” (Luke 18:31-33)

No, He did not.

“For as yet they did not understand the Scripture, that He must rise again from the dead.” (John 20:9)

(All Scriptural quotation comes from the New American Standard Bible)

Here’s a closer look at whether or not there is a contradiction:

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Here are the links related to Presuppositional apologetics gathered between January 8th-14th, 2018.

1.) Did Religion Kill More People? No. Atheism’s Huge Body Count

2.) Greg Bahnsen’s Dissertation Online!

3.) God Must Exist: Truth Telling and Lying

4.) A Complexity is Not a Contradiction: Jonah and the Whale as an Example

5.) Basic Bible Podcast Episode 17 – Presuppositional Apologetics with Dr. John Frame

6.) New Facebook page: Revelational Epistemology

 

Missed the last round up?  Check out the re-blogged post from a friend OR that of Another REBLOG HERE

 

 

Note: This is a seven part series we will feature on Sunday on the important topic of a Christian Theology of Health by Dr. Joshua Trock.  His Twitter account can be found here.

Have nothing to do with irreverent, silly myths. Rather train yourself for godliness; for while bodily training is of some value, godliness is of value in every way, as it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come. 1 Tim 4:7-8 

 

The Theology of Health 

By Dr. Joshua Trock PT, DPT 

During the New Year, one of the main focuses for a lot people is on evaluating the parts of their life that they want to improve and, more often than not, one of those things is to “get in shape”. This is true across the board for Christians and non-Christians alike. According to a Nielsen survey from 2015 the top 2 New Year’s resolutions are to “lose weight” and to “stay fit and healthy.” (http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2015/2015s-top-new-years-resolution-fitness.html)
Now while these goals may be ubiquitous amongst all Americans, the question that I want to pose for the Christian is “Why?” Why do you want to be healthier? What are the intrinsic motivations that are driving you to put forth the time and resources to obtain these goals? Are these pursuits merely pragmatic or selfish or is there something deeper spiritually that undergirds these yearnings to take care of yourself?  

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Tommorow would be the first month anniversary of RC Sproul’s promotion to heaven.

I thought I share his top 10 messages on Sermon Audio.

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A weekend light reading review, because Pastors sometimes need a break from heavy theological reading…

Gene Yang. New Super-Man, Volume 2: Coming to America. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, October 10th 2017. 144 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is the second volume of a fun series in which this volume collects issues 7 through 12.  One of the big reason why I enjoyed this series is because this is different than the typical Superman:  While the writing of this book is in English this New Superman is ethnically Chinese.  I love the Asian cultural flavor to the story; it is unique in a stimulating way while not being so Chinese or Asian where non-Chinese readers would not understand what is going on or turned off.  I thought this reflected the skill of the author Gene Yang a Chinese American computer science teacher turn comic book writer.  He is among my top five favorite comic book writer.

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SlimJim Note: This is a guest post from our dear friend   I’m currently away at the moment.

In 1999 and the early 2000s a technology called the DVR became commonplace in American households. The ability to record live TV and play it back without a VCR or disc placed some freedom in the hands of the users. The most obvious benefit was the ability to speedily fast forward through commercials during your favorite show. There was one particular commercial which stands out in my mind.

I don’t recall who made the commercial, but there was a man watching a football game. His team was losing, but they were lining up for a last second, game winning field goal. Just as the ball was snapped and the kicker was ready to kick, the man in the commercial paused the TV with his DVR remote. He runs out of his house and down the street to a church building where he lights a candle and prays earnestly in a pew. Then he rushes back to his house and un-pauses the television and you can see the kicker make the kick! The man’s prayers are apparently answered and his team wins this important game.

The absurdity of the commercial is obvious. I cannot imagine anyone watching considered it a teaching about prayer, of course. But anyone watching realizes that the kicker made the kick before the man was even out of his house on his way to church. All his prayers and lighting of candles is entertaining, but it is impossible to believe even in the fictional world of the commercial that the kick was made as the result of his prayers. Whether that kick was made or missed was not going to change once it occurred. This is a reality of how time works.

Yet how often have you seen well-meaning Christians share similar sentiments. It goes like this. A celebrity dies who was well-known for his wicked behavior. Never once did the person even hint at being a believer in the One True God through Jesus Christ. As you scroll through social media you see people posting things like RIP (that’s another post), stories memorializing the person and the inevitable: “Praying that celebrity X repented and received Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior before he died.”

Do you see that this prayer is as useless as the man in the commercial praying for the field goal? An event that has already completed is one time you shouldn’t pray. You will find no example in the Bible of a prayer that a completed event would be anything but what it already is.

What do you expect? That a man died yesterday and somehow your prayer today is going to change whether or not he received Christ as Lord and Savior? Christian, Jesus died so that your prayers may be heard by the Father – please keep them from being vapid. Praying about something that has already occurred simply makes no sense. There are countless examples of this that I’ve seen and heard. And if you are honest with yourself you will notice when you do it, if you do.

“Lord I pray that so and so had a good time at our church last week.”

“Lord I pray that it isn’t really cancer, that the test results were wrong.”

Here’s the formula: “Lord I pray that <insert your desire here> happened in the past.”

Similarly, we often pray about things that have already occurred, but we don’t know the outcome. Consider this prayer when leaving the scene of a biopsy: “Lord, please don’t let it be cancer!”  It’s either “already cancer: or it “isn’t already cancer.” This is another example, however technical of praying for a past event, or praying that an existent circumstance is different from what it is.

Think about it. If the doctor tells you it is cancer, how will praying that he is wrong make it wrong? The point is there is no action God could actually take in response to your prayer. If the doctor is wrong, then he’s already wrong in spite of your prayer; if he is right, and it is cancer, then praying he’s wrong won’t change that. Instead pray for healing, and more importantly, grace to endure the trial you or your loved one is facing.

Here’s the take home – do not pray in such a way that you pray for past events. When you ask God for supplication, ask Him to do things that He can do. Even our great God does not change the past. If you object and say, “Our God can do anything He pleases,” I will respond by saying, “Amen. But He gives no example in Scripture of praying in this manner, isn’t that where we ought to get our model of prayer?”

I know, hoping that people were saved is noble. Wanting people to enjoy your church gathering or for them to not have cancer is a good desire. What I’m saying is that your prayer ought to be directed rationally at our perfectly rational God. If what you mean to say is you “hope celebrity X was saved,” then say that! Just don’t speak or act like prayer isn’t something really special and important by diminishing the purpose of it by praying in ways God simply will not honor.

Ultimately, Christian, when you pray for God to do anything with a past event, you put your faith to the test. For we are to pray believing and if you are believing for something which has already occurred to be anything but what it is, you will be disappointed, maybe even disappointed by God someday. That is a place where no Christian ought to be.

For a good article on how TO pray, consider this excellent piece: Confident Christians Pray with Confidence
by Josh Buice

Greg Bahnsen is one of my favorite Christian apologist although sadly he died too young.  He has popularized the apologetics’ method of Cornelius Van Til, the father of Presuppositional apologetics.  Bahnsen himself is probably best known for his debate with .  If you are new to Bahnsen you should check out this Free Greg Bahnsen Apologetics Course here.

Now there’s also something else from Bahnsen that is available for free online: His dissertation.

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