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Archive for April 18th, 2012

Strengths

This book is not filled with boredom.  Almost every page is filled with insights and excitement.  Every category that Dr. Montoya covered is significant to expository preaching.   His figure of speeches used to convey his message, make it easy to follow.  This really added color to the material, which makes it easy for me to retain the information.

A big area that I felt was important was his explanation of body gestures.  This is an important area in preaching.  He explained it well.  This will help me much in preaching.  I highly recommend this book for those interested to learn about passionate preaching.  Whether you are a beginner or seasonal preacher, this book is a must have.

Weaknesses

I think that having a couple of questions at the end of every chapter for reflection would help challenge the reader’s thoughts concerning passionate, expository preaching.

With that said, here are some good quotes that ministered to me.

Dr. Montoya—

Preaching is passionate because it deals with the very nature of God and the expression of His love for humanity.  The attitude in the study and the attitude in the pulpit are similar yet different.  The study is the discovery of the truth, and the pulpit is the sharing of this truth.  The simmering of the week boils over in the pulpit on Sunday.  How can we preach such magnificent truths as though they were common and mundane (13)?

Charles Spurgeon—

We must regard the people as the wood and the sacrifice, well wetted a second and a third time by the cares of the week, upon which, like the prophet, we must pray down the fire from heaven.  A dull minister creates a dull audience.  You cannot expect the office-bearers and members of the church to travel by steam if their own chosen pastor still drives the old broad-wheeled wagon (14).

Dr. Montoya—

As a minister matures, his passion should increase.  Have you ever noticed why older preachers command such attention?  It is because they have lived the truth (16)!

Dr. Montoya—

My own experience bears this out.  I am by nature shy and inhibited, and during my early years I possessed a high degree of stage fright.  Yet God has allowed me to go beyond this weakness and to develop a degree of passion in my preaching.  If there was hope for me, there is hope for other timid souls (17).

Dr. Montoya—

Artificial elements do not give life to a dead sermon offered by a preacher devoid of the Spirit (23).

Dr. Montoya—

Spiritual power comes when we realize our utter unworthiness to preach and our total dependence on God for everything.  God despises a proud heart and opposes the proud.  Instead, He chooses to honor those who honor Him (1 Sam. 2:30).  We experience our driest and deepest valleys when we rely upon our own strength (24).

Dr. Montoya—

We should look to the prophet Isaiah to seek a similar vision of the exalted and holy God (24).

Dr. Montoya—

A story is told of a young preacher who proudly went up to preach and soon after made a mess of his delivery (24).

Dr. Montoya—

We must take care take care of how we ascend to the pulpit if we desire God’s power in our preaching.  As the Holy of Holies was not available to all—unless they were qualified and entered in purity and reverence—so should it be with the pulpit.  We dare not assume the role, treat it as profane, and expect God to bless.  He will not!  The psalmist in Psalm 24:3-6 lays down the qualifications needed for an ascent to the holy hill of the Lord: clean hands, a pure heat; a true soul (25).

Dr. Montoya—

Psalm 15 states the same requirements.  Here the psalmist qualifies the one who may “abide in God’s tent” and who may “dwell on His holy hill” as one who walks with integrity and works righteousness, speaks truth in his heart, does not slander with his tongue, does no evil to his neighbor, does not take up a reproach against his friend, despises a reprobate, and honors those who fear the Lord (25).

Dr. Montoya—

The key to spiritual power is to keep short accounts with God (26).

Dr. Montoya—

The pulpit can be a great help in keeping us from habitual sin if we acknowledge its sanctity and the need for personal holiness as a requirement for our entrance into it to declare God’s Word (27).

Dr. Montoya—

Men of God sin, and men of God must confess their sins (27).

Let me add that the pulpit is no place for the confession of our personal sins to God.  We should do that in our study or in our closets.  Such show of hypocrisy—that we would use the sacred desk as a pretense for humility and holiness—must be sorrowfully loathsome to God.  We must be personally well acquainted with the cross of Christ—the fount of cleansing is for us first.  Alexander Maclaren has rightly written, ‘It takes a crucified man to preach a crucified Savior’” (27).

Dr. Montoya—

Holiness must also be maintained through a constant and living communion with God.  If we are to be leaders of worship, then we must be true worshipers as well.  If we are to speak for God, then we must be those who speak with God.  If we are to lead souls to heaven, then we must be those who descend from heaven with God’s Shekinah around us” (27).

Dr. Montoya—

Here is where so many of us fail.  We do not practice what we preach.  Yet we wonder why the power has departed from our preaching  (27).

Dr. Montoya—

The key to spiritual power is to keep short accounts with God (26).

George Mueller—

I saw more clearly than ever that the first and great and primary business to which I ought to attend every day was to have my soul happy in the Lord.  The first thing to be concerned about was not how much I might serve the Lord,…but how I might get my soul into a happy state, and how my inner [life] might be nourished (27).

Dr. Montoya—

A sermon is not an exercise in exegesis, but a declaration of a truth to move us to moral action (46).

Dr. Montoya—

Every preacher should be a theologian.  He should know his doctrine because every sermon is a doctrinal sermon—an unfolding of some divine truth revealed in the Scriptures (47).

Dr. Montoya—

It is our burden for others that creates passion in our preaching (56).

Dr. Montoya—

When were you last so overwhelmed by your love for your congregation that your words went forth mixed with tears (62).

Dr. Montoya—

Teaching with authority is learned from Christ—not from the scribes (74).

Bibliography

Montoya, Alex D., and MacArthur, John. Preaching With Passion. Kregel Pubns, 2007.

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