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Archive for May, 2012

Purchase:  Amazon

Challenging book–especially the rebuke towards the general Christianity in the United States that is affluent but not keeping eternity, evangelism and the Great Commission in perspective. It was not easy for me to hear the rebuke of this Indian brother and servant of God–but one which I recognizes is from the LORD to challenge myself and others to re-evaluate and remember our priorities as Christians in support of what truly matters in eternity. I enjoy the part in the book that has practical suggestions of how one can save more money–to allow more cash flow to support missions.

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We have just finish posting the outlines for an introductory and genre hermeneutics series I use when I teach on this topic.  For the sake of convenience, I’ve posted the links to both series here.

I think it’s important for Christians in terms of spiritual life, practical theology, systematic theology and apologetics to be conscious of our hermeneutics.  To that end, I hope this would be helpful.

LEVEL ONE: INTRODUCTION TO HERMENEUTICS

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session One: Introduction

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Two: How Should We Study Theology? Issues of Sources and Authority

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Three: Doctrine of Special Revelation

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Four: The Doctrine of the Self-Attesting Word of God

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Five: Doctrine of Inerrancy and Ramifications for Hermeneutics

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Six: Doctrine of Biblical Clarity

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Seven: The importance of Words and Grammars

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Eight: Context Part I: The Immediate Context

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Nine: Context Part II: The Chapter and Book Context

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Ten: Context Part III: The Entirety of Scripture

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Eleven: The Aid of Natural Revelation in Hermeneutics

Introduction to Hermeneutics Series: Session Twelve: Hermeneutics and Apologetics

LEVEL TWO: BIBLICAL GENRES (LITERARY FORMS)

SESSION ONE: DEFINITION OF GENRE AND DO THEY EXIST?

SESSION TWO: THE IMPORTANCE OF GENRE IN INTERPRETATION

SESSION THREE: PROSE I: OLD TESTAMENT NARRATIVE

SESSION FOUR: PROSE II: OLD TESTAMENT HISTORICAL NARRATIVE

SESSION FIVE: PROSE III: LAW

SESSION SIX: POETRY I: WHAT IS HEBREW POETRY?

SESSION SEVEN: POETRY II: LAMENT

SESSION EIGHT: POETRY III: PRAISE

SESSION NINE: POETRY IV: PROVERBS

SESSION TEN: POETRY V: OTHER HEBREW WISDOM

SESSION ELEVEN: PROPHECY I: ANNOUNCEMENT OF JUDGEMENT

SESSION TWELVE: PROPHECY II: ORACLE OF SALVATION

SESSION THIRTEEN: PROPHECY III: APOCALYPTIC

SESSION FOURTEEN: NEW TESTAMENT HISTORICAL NARRATIVE/ GOSPELS

SESSION FIFTEEN: EPISTLES

APPENDIX SESSION ONE: PARABLES

APPENDIX SESSION TWO: INTER-RELATIONSHIP OF GENRE IN INTERPRETATION

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GO TO APPENDIX ONE

I. Introduction

a. You have probably heard the saying “Let Scripture interpret Scripture”.

b. Throughout this series on hermeneutics and Genre course, one can see the inter-relationship of Genre.  This inter-relationship of genres is important in interpretation.

c. One more fully appreciate the principle of “Let Scripture interpret Scripture” in seeing how one particular genre of Scripture can shed interpretative light of another genre of Scripture.

d. This appendix summarizes how each genre can be further illuminated by another genre of Scripture. (NOTE: This outline is not exhaustive)

e. This outline might be helpful as a guide to the hermeneutics of proper cross-referencing.

II. Interpretative insights of a Biblical passage in light of similar genre

a. Find if there are other places that are similar in Genre and see if there is new information provided to get a more fuller pictures.

Example: Looking at the four Gospels to get a picture of one incident.

b. Pay attention to progressive revelation: Are their more information provided in later revelation of the same Genre?

Example: Book of Revelation gives more details of prophecies than Isaiah, Daniel, etc.

III. Interpretative insights of a Biblical passage in light of other genre

a. Old Testament Narrative

i.      Proverbs: Are there any particular wise proverb that address the particular slice of reality of this text?

ii.      New Testament Narrative/Gospels: Has Jesus and the early church authoritatively preach on this text, revealing insights within the text or further details?

iii.      Epistles:

1. Similar to New Testament Narrative, does the Epistles offer any insights into the text or further details?

2. The Epistles are especially helpful in giving theological interpretation of Old Testament Narratives.

b. Old Testament Historical Narrative

i.      What applies for Narrative above (insights from Proverbs, New Testament Narrative/Gospels and Epistles) applies here as well.

ii.      Narrative: Are their any Covenants and promises described previously in Old Testament narratives that illuminate what is going on in this particular text?

iii.      Laws: This provides the biblical standard of norms to make a moral judgment of the event in the Historical Narrative.

iv.      Lament and Praise Poetry: Does the Psalms provide further insight of the difficulties or celebration of the events in the Historical narrative?

v.      Announcement of judgment and oracle of salvation: Are there any prophetic books that occur simultaneously with the events going on?

c. Old Testament Laws

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative:

1. Provides the historical and situational circumstances that the Laws are prescribed to.

2. Also, are their any Covenants and promises described previously in Old Testament narratives that illuminate what is going on in this particular text?

3. Are their examples of laws illustrated?

ii.      Praise and announcement of judgment: Are their any given perspectives of the Law of God provided in these genres?

iii.      New Testament Narrative/Gospels and Epistles: Does these genres reveal any Old Testament Laws are no longer applicable for today?

d. Lament and Praise

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative:

1. Provides the historical and situational circumstances that the Lament or Praises Psalms are prescribed to.

2. Also, are there any Covenants and promises described previously in Old Testament narratives that illuminate what is going on in this particular text?

ii.      New Testament Narrative/Gospel and Epistles: Did the New Testament further expounded on these texts?

e. Proverbs

i.      Laws: Since Proverbs is by nature “slice of reality”, it is also important that any imperative is seen within the boundary of the Law.

ii.      Epistles: Again, since Proverbs is by nature “slice of reality”, it is also important that any imperative within Proverbs be viewed within the boundary of the commands and prohibition of the New Testament.

iii.      New Testament Narrative/Gospel and Epistles: Did the New Testament further expounded on these texts?

f. Other Hebrew Wisdom

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative: Provides the historical background.

ii.      Law, Proverbs and the Epistles: Especially in the “Counter-Wisdom” literatures, it is important to interpret things in light of the theological and moral boundaries of Scripture.

g. Announcement of Judgment

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative:

1. Can provide the historical background of when the text was written.

2. Also, are there any Covenants and promises of curses described previously in Old Testament narratives and historical narratives that illuminate what is going on in this particular text?

ii.      Law: What are God’s command and prohibition that God is not pleased with, that result in this announcement of judgment?

iii.      Oracle of Salvation and Apocalyptic: In light of the doom and gloom of Announcement of Judgment, is there any hope to be found in the Oracle of Salvation o r the Apocalyptic Genre?

h. Oracle of Salvation

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative:

1. Can provide the historical background of when the text was written.

2. Also, are there any Covenants and promises of blessings described previously in Old Testament narratives and historical narratives that illuminate what is going on in this particular text?

ii.      Announcement of Judgment: Oracle of Salvation is seen as good news in light of the announcement of judgment.

iii.      Apocalyptic: Are there further expansion and details of hope to be found in Apocalyptic genre that can illuminate the oracle of Salvation?

i. Apocalyptic

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative:

1. Can provide the historical background of when the text was written.

2. Also, are there any Covenants and promises of blessings and curses described previously in Old Testament narratives and historical narratives that are being described as being fulfilled in this particular text?

ii.      New Testament Narrative/Gospel and Epistles: Did the New Testament further expounded on these texts?

j. New Testament Narrative/Gospel

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative:

Are there any Covenants and promises of blessings and curses described previously in Old Testament narratives and historical narratives that are being described as being fulfilled in this particular text?

ii.      Law: Are there certain behavior and manners that needs to be understood in light of the Old Testament Law?

iii.      Lament, Praises, Announcement of Judgment, Apocalyptic: Are there any prophecies that are being fulfilled here

iv.      Epistles: Are there further theological explanations of historical realities to be found in the epistles?

k. Epistles

i.      Narrative & Historical Narrative and New Testament Narrative/Gospel:

1. Are their any illustrations found in the Epistles that comes from these narratives and require previous background familiarity of these narratives?

2. Are there any Covenants and promises of blessings and curses described previously in Old Testament narratives and historical narratives that are being described as being fulfilled in this particular text?

ii.      Lament, Praises, Announcement of Judgment, Apocalyptic: Are there any prophecies that are being fulfilled here?

l. Parables

i.      Law: Are there certain behavior and manners that needs to be understood in light of the Old Testament Law?

ii.      New Testament Narrative/Gospel: Does the rest of the Gospels happen to provide information important to understanding the parable’s details?

iii.      Epistles: In regards to one’s interpretation of the Parables, is it within the boundary of theological and moral orthodoxy as expounded in the Epistles?

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From Election Forum.  The following below is a voter’s guide for Los Angeles County, the rest of the state can be accessed from their website.

Ratings:

Every candidate is considered after thorough research; we also have a questionnaire for candidates to complete.

  • thumb upthumb upthumb up : Strongest endorsement for values voters
  • thumb upthumb up : Above average
  • thumb up : Better than opponent, vote represents “lesser of two evils”
  • No Endorsement: We either oppose the candidates or have found no reason to support a candidate. If you don’t vote for a candidate or issue, all your other votes still count.

Note: Historically third party candidates and write—in candidates do not win statewide elections in California. Click here to see article on Voting Your Christian Values.

Statewide Offices, Governor, Senator, CA Supreme Court, etc.

President

President of the United States; Democractic Party

  • Barack Obama, Democratic

President of the United States; Republican Party Party

  • Charles Roemer, III, Republican
  • Ron Paul, Republican
  • Newt Gingrich, Republican
  • Rick Santorum, Republican
  • Mitt Romney, Republican
  • Fred Krager, Republican

President of the United States; American Independent Party

  • Edward Noonan, American Independent
  • Laurie Roth, American Independent
  • Mad Max Riekse, American Independent

President of the United States; Green Party

  • Jill Stein, Green
  • Kent Mesplay, Green
  • Roseanne Barr, Green

President of the United States; Libertarian Party

  • Gary Johnson, Libertarian
  • James Ogle, Libertarian
  • Bill Still, Libertarian
  • R. J. Harris, Libertarian
  • Roger Gray, Libertarian
  • Lee Wrights, Libertarian
  • Barbara Waymire, Libertarian
  • Scott Keller, Libertarian
  • Carl Person, Libertarian

President of the United States; Peace and Freedom Party

  • Ross Anderson, Peace and Freedom
  • Stephen Durham, Peace and Freedom
  • Stewart Alexander, Peace and Freedom

United States Senator

  • Kabiruddin, Ali, Peace and Freedom
  • Dianne Feinstein, Democratic
  • Elizabeth Emken, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Oscar Braun, Republican
  • Colleen Fernald, Democratic
  • Daniel Hughes, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Dirk Konopik, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • John Boruff, Republican
  • Robert Lauten, Republican
  • Al Ramirez, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Michael Strimling, Democratic
  • Orly Taitz, Republican
  • Rick Williams, Republican
  • Phillip Conlon, Republican
  • Nachum Shifren, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Rogelio Gloria, Republican
  • Marsha Feinland, Peace and Freedom
  • Nak Shah, Democratic
  • Don Krampe, Republican
  • Dennis Jackson, Republican
  • Don Grundmann, American Independent
  • Gail Lightfoot, Libertarian
  • David Levitt, Democratic
  • Diane Stewart, Democratic

US Congress by District

United States Representative; District 23

  • Terry Phillips
  • Eric Parker, Republican
  • Kevin McCarthy, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

United States Representative; District 25

  • Lee Rogers, Democratic
  • Howard McKeon, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • Dante Acosta, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • Catherine Wright, Republican

United States Representative; District 26

  • Linda Parks
  • Jess Herrera, Democratic
  • Albert Goldberg, Democratic
  • Julia Brownley, Democratic
  • David Thayne, Democratic
  • Tony Strickland, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

United States Representative; District 27

  • Robert Duran, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • Judy Chu, Democratic
  • Jack Orswell, Republican

United States Representative; District 28

  • Jenny Worman, Republican
  • Massie Munroe, Democratic
  • Garen Mailyan, Republican
  • Sal Genovese, Democratic
  • Jonathan Kalbfeld, Democratic
  • Adam Schiff, Democratic
  • Phil Jennerjahn, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

United States Representative; District 29

  • David Hernandez thumbsup thumbsup
  • Tony Cardenas, Democratic
  • Richard Valdez, Democratic

United States Representative; District 30

  • Susan Shelley, Republican
  • Navraj Singh, Republican
  • Vince Gilmore, Democratic
  • Brad Sherman, Democratic
  • Howard Berman, Democratic
  • Mark Reed, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Michael Powelson, Green

United States Representative; District 32

  • G. Gonzalez, Democratic
  • David Miller, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • Grace Napolitano, Democratic

United States Representative; District 33

  • David Steinman, Green
  • William Bloomfield, Jr. thumbsup
  • Timothy Pape, Democratic
  • Christopher David, Republican thumbsup
  • Steve Collett, Libertarian thumbsup
  • Bruce Margolin, Democratic
  • Henry Waxman, Democratic
  • Zein Obagi, Democratic thumbsup

United States Representative; District 34

  • Stephen Smith, Republican thumbsup
  • Howard Johnson, Peace and Freedom
  • Xavier Becerra, Democratic

United States Representative; District 35

  • Gloria McLeod, Democratic
  • Joe Baca, Democratic
  • Anthony Vieyra, Green thumbsup

United States Representative; District 37

  • Karen Bass, Democratic

United States Representative; District 38

  • Benjamin Campos, Republican thumbsup
  • Jorge Robles, Republican thumbsup
  • Linda Sánchez, Democratic

United States Representative; District 39

  • Ed Royce, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • Jay Chen, Democratic
  • D’Marie Mulattieri

United States Representative; District 40

  • David Sanchez, Democratic
  • Lucille Roybal-Allard, Democratic

United States Representative; District 42

  • Ken S. Calvert, Republican thumbsupthumbsup
  • Eva S. Johnson, Republican thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Clayton Thibodeau, Republican thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup

United States Representative; District 43

  • Maxine Waters, Democratic
  • Bob Flores, Democratic thumbsup

United States Representative; District 44

  • Janice Hahn, Democratic
  • Laura Richardson, Democratic

Unites States Representative; District 45

  • John Webb, Republicanthumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • John Campbell, Republican
  • Sukhee Kang, Democrat

United States Representative; District 47

  • Steve Foley, Republican
  • Alan Lowenthal, Democratic
  • Jay Shah, Democratic
  • Gary DeLong, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Sanford Kahn, Republican
  • Steven Kuykendall, Republican
  • Peter Mathews, Democratic
  • Usha Shah, Democratic

State Assembly

Assembly; District 35

  • Gerald “Gerry” Manata, Democrat
  • K.H. “Katcho” Achadjian, Republican thumbsupthumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 36

  • Thomas Lackey, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Steve Fox, Democratic
  • Ron Smith, Republican thumbsup thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 38

  • Edward Headington, Democratic
  • Patricia McKeon, Republican
  • Paul Strickland, Republican
  • Scott Wilk, Republican thumbsup thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 39

  • Omar Cuevas, Republican thumbsup
  • Raul Bocanegra, Democratic
  • John Paul Lindblad, Green
  • Richard Alarcon, Democratic
  • Ricardo Benitez, Republican thumbsup
  • Margie Carranza, Republican

Member of the State Assembly; District 41

  • Ed Colton, Republican
  • Michael Cacciotti, Democratic
  • Donna Lowe, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • Victoria Rusnak, Democratic
  • Chris Holden, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 43

  • Mike Gatto, Democratic
  • Greg Krikorian, Republican thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 44

  • Eileen MacEnery, Democratic
  • Jeffrey Gorell, Republican thumbsup
  • Thomas Mullens, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 45

  • Bob Blumenfield, Democratic
  • Chris Kolski, Republican thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 46

  • Jay Stern, Republican thumbsup thumbsup
  • Adrin Nazarian, Democratic
  • Andrew Lachman, Democratic
  • Adriano Lecaros, Democratic
  • Laurette Healey, Democratic
  • Brian Johnson, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 48

  • Michael Meza
  • Roger Hernandez, Democratic
  • Joe Gardner, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 49

  • Matthew Lin, Republican thumbsup
  • Edwin Chau, Democratic
  • Mitchell Ing, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 50

  • Richard Bloom, Democratic
  • Torie Osborn, Democratic
  • Betsy Butler, Democratic
  • Bradly Torgan, Republican

Member of the State Assembly; District 51

  • Oscar Gutierrez, Democratic
  • Arturo Chavez, Democratic
  • Luis Lopez, Democratic
  • Jimmy Gomez, Democratic
  • Richard Friedberg, Democraticthumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 52

  • Norma Torres, Democratic
  • Ray Moors, Democratic
  • Paul Avila, Democratic
  • Kenny Coble, Republican thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 53

  • Michael Aldapa, Democratic
  • John Pérez, Democratic
  • Roger Young, Democratic
  • Jose Aguilar, Republican thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 54

  • Keith McCowen, Republican thumbsup
  • Holly Mitchell, Democratic
  • Ed Nicoletti, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 55

  • Gregg Fritchle, Democratic
  • Curt Hagman, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 56

  • Corky Reynaga-Emett, Republican thumbsupthumbsup
  • V. Manuel Perez, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 57

  • Rudy Bermudez, Democratic
  • Ian Calderon, Democratic
  • Noel Jaimes, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 58

  • Sultan Ahmad, Democratic
  • Cristina Garcia, Democratic
  • Daniel Crespo, Democratic
  • Patricia Kotze-Ramos, Republican thumbsup
  • Luis Marquez, Democratic
  • Tom Calderon, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 59

  • Reginald Jones-Sawyer, Democratic
  • Greg Akili, Democratic
  • Rodney Robinson, Democratic
  • Armenak Nouridjanian, Democratic
  • Gertrude Holmes-Magee, Democratic thumbsup

Member of the State Assembly; District 60

  • Jeff Miller, Republican (Incumbent) thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Stan Skipworth, Republican thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • JosÉ Luis Pérez, Democratic
  • Eric Linder, Republican
  • Greg Kraft, Republican

Member of the State Assembly; District 61

  • Joe Ludwig, Republican
  • Fredy R. De Leon
  • Bill Batey, Republican
  • Jose Medina, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 62

  • Steven Bradford, Democratic
  • Mervin Evans, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 63

  • Jack Guerrero, Republicanthumbsup
  • Diane Martinez, Democratic
  • Cathrin Sargent, Democratic
  • Anthony Rendon, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 64

  • Isadore Hall, III, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 66

Since I am a candidate in this particular race, Election Forum will abstain from posting ratings or recommendations.—Craig Huey

  • Craig Huey, Republican
  • Nathan Mintz, Republican
  • Al Muratsuchi, Democratic

Member of the State Assembly; District 70

  • Bonnie Lowenthal, Democratic
  • Martha Flores Gibson, Republican thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup

State Senate

State Senator; District 21

  • Star Moffatt, Democratic
  • Steve Knight, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

State Senator; District 23

  • Melissa O’Donnell, Democratic
  • Bill Emmerson, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

State Senator; District 25

  • Ameenah Fuller, Democratic
  • Gilbert Gonzales, Republican thumbsup
  • Carol Liu, Democratic

State Senator; District 27

  • Fran Pavley, Democratic
  • Todd Zink, Republican thumbsup thumbsup

State Senator; District 29

  • Greg Diamond, Democratic
  • Robert Huff, Republican thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup

State Senator; District 33

  • Ricardo Lara, Democratic

State Senator; District 35

  • Charlotte Svolos, Republican thumbsup
  • Paul Butterfield, Democratic
  • Roderick Wright, Democratic

Judicial

Electionforum.org ranks every aspect of a judicial candidate’s record on a scale of 1 (most activist) to 10 (most constructionist).

Nothing is overlooked, from a judge’s rulings to on-the-record statements to American Bar Association ratings. We also look at their stated positions and contributions as well as who’s endorsing them.

Finally, each judge’s career is considered from a bird’s-eye view. Experience. Integrity. Commitment to community. We even personally talk to the candidates.

Ratings:

Judicial Index Average

Judicial Index Average
Judicial Activist Strict Constructionist
  • Positions
  • Contributions
  • Rulings
  • Statements

Qualifications

Qualifications
Unqualified Very Qualified
  • Experience
  • Reputation
  • Integrity
  • American Bar
    Association
    ratings

Judge of the Superior Court; County of Los Angeles; Office 3

  • Craig Gold – 4
  • Laurence N. Kaldor – 4
  • Sean D. Coen – 5
  • Joe Escalante – 4

Judge of the Superior Court; County of Los Angeles; Office 10

  • Kim Smith – 6
  • Sanjay T. Kumar – 7

Judge of the Superior Court; County of Los Angeles; Office 38

  • Lynn Diane Olson – 3
  • Douglas W. Weitzman – 4

Judge of the Superior Court; County of Los Angeles; Office 65

  • Matt Schonbrun – 4
  • Shannon Knight – 5
  • Andrea C. Thompson – 8

Judge of the Superior Court; County of Los Angeles; Office 78

  • Kenneth R. Hughey – 9
  • James D. Otto – 5

Judge of the Superior Court; County of Los Angeles; Office 114

  • Eric Harmon – 5
  • Berj Parseghian – 7
  • Ben M. Brees – 1

County

District Attorney; County of Los Angeles

  • John L. Breault, III
  • Jackie Lacey
  • Alan Jackson thumbsup thumbsup
  • Danette E. Meyers
  • Carmen Trutanich
  • Bobby Grace

Supervisor; County of Los Angeles; Supervisorial District 2

  • Mark Ridley-Thomas

Supervisor; County of Los Angeles; Supervisorial District 5

  • Michael D. Antonovich thumbsup thumbsup thumbsup
  • M. A. C. “Maestro” Enriquez-Marquez
  • Raj Pal Kahlon

Special District

Member, Board of Directors; Central Basin Municipal Water District; Division 1

  • Ed Vasquez
  • James B. Roybal
  • Yvette Lizette Silva thumbsup

Member, Board of Directors; Central Basin Municipal Water District; Division 4

  • Rudy C. Montalvo
  • Leticia Vasquez

Member, Board of Directors; Central Basin Municipal Water District; Division 5

  • Tony Mendoza
  • Jay W. Gray
  • Phillip D. Hawkins

Party Committee—most districts not researched

Member, Republican Party County Central Committee; County of Los Angeles; Assembly District 43 (7 Elected)

  • Judith Durning
  • Ryan Ford
  • Lenore Solis
  • Mary “Mell” Flynn
  • Mark Vafiades
  • Dale Samson
  • Chance Glasco
  • Nicholas Paul Renzi
  • Victor Phillip Alkana
  • D. “Doffie” Lewis
  • Linda P. Sheffield
  • William E. Saracino thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Ben Jones
  • Elliott Graham

Member, Republican Party County Central Committee; County of Los Angeles; Assembly District 48 (7 Elected)

  • Robert B. Ewing
  • David Miller
  • Starret J. Meyer
  • Marlene F. Osborn
  • Judy Marie Nelson
  • Valerie R. Evans
  • Peggy A. Mew
  • Sheena Lynn Ewing
  • Kathy Howard
  • Jorge Huaman
  • Kevin Stapleton
  • Mike Spence thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup

Member, Republican Party County Central Committee; County of Los Angeles; Assembly District 58 (7 Elected)

  • Grace Hu thumbsupthumbsup
  • Allen G. Wood thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Haridas Terhanian
  • Jo Marie Johnson
  • Sergio Estevez
  • Dan N. Cristea
  • Paul Kim
  • Rick Royse
  • Matt S. Kauble

Member, Republican Party County Central Committee; County of Los Angeles; Assembly District 62 (7 Elected)

  • Marco Antonio “Tony” Leal
  • Julius D. Wilson thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Carl Frederick Davis, Jr. thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Douglas G. Ehlers
  • Maureen Johnson thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Dale A. Wallace
  • Jennifer Tyler
  • David J. Picard
  • Mary Miller
  • Carol L. Cole
  • Gabriel Dibble

Member, Republican Party County Central Committee; County of Los Angeles; Assembly District 66 (7 Elected)

  • David Frederick Hadley thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Bryan Wayne Matthews
  • Patricia O. Lagrelius
  • Kenneth Martin Adler
  • William L. Schmidt thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Kenneth A. Hartley
  • Paul A. Contreras
  • Steve Redlich thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Kim Mac Mullan
  • Ketnapa Siri
  • John H. Nunn
  • Paul M. Nowatka
  • Larry E. Jones
  • Laine Truelove McNally
  • John J. Parsons
  • G. Rick Marshall thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Kyle D. Ebersole

Member, Republican Party County Central Committee; County of Los Angeles; Assembly District 70 (7 Elected)

  • Lydia Gutierrez thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Nancy Jean Sciortino
  • Davina M. Keiser
  • Dave Najar
  • Charles R. Eldred, Jr. thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Mark A. Voelker
  • John Fer thumbsupthumbsupthumbsup
  • Tina M. Thompson

Local Measures

City of Compton

NO Measure B City Council District Formation — City of Compton (Charter Amendment – Majority Approval Required)

County of Los Angeles

NO Measure H L.A. County Hotel Occupancy Tax Continuation Measure — County of Los Angeles (Ordinance – Majority Approval Required)

City of Los Angeles

NO Measure L L.A. County Landfill Tax Continuation Measure — City of Los Angeles (Ordinance – Majority Approval Required)

City of Pasadena

YES Measure A Formation of Geographic Sub-Districts Within Pasadena Unified School District — City of Pasadena (Charter Amendment – Majority Approval Required)

NO Measure CK School Improvement Funding — Sulphur Springs Union Elementary School District (School Bonds – 55% Approval Required)

NO Measure CO School Improvement Funding — Charter Oak Unified School District (School Bonds – 55% Approval Required)

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I think it’s so ironic that organizations that supports efforts in ending Breast cancer would donate money still to organizations that commit abortions.

WINTERY KNIGHT

From Life News.

Excerpt:

new study published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention in February reported a very statistically significant increased risk of breast cancer for women with previous abortions as opposed to women who have never had one.

The study, consisting of 1,351 women and led by researcher Ai-Ren Jiang, reported a statistically significant 1.52-fold elevation in risk for women with induced abortions and a “significant dose-response relationship between (the risk) for breast cancer and number of induced abortions,” meaning the risk climbed with a higher number of previous abortions.

For premenopausal women who have had abortions, the numbers were relatively small, and the observed 16% risk elevation was not statistically significant. However, for those with three or more abortions, the risk climbed to a statistically significant 1.55-fold elevation.

“The results have revealed that induced abortion was related to increased risk of breast caner. Premenopausal…

View original post 314 more words

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In order to avoid the confusion regarding the apparent lack of fulfillment and the undermining of biblical inerrancy, I believe that such interlocking of the words, dynamic and predictive discourse, should be dichotomized in order to have absolute identifiable terms.

Before I explain why I believe that such interlocking of the words dynamic and predictive discourse, should be dichotomized, in order to have absolute, identifiable terms that will help decrease the undermining of biblical inerrancy, I will first try to identify and define what is unfulfilled prophecy, synthesize the issues, and contrast the various possible views.

So how do we define and identify unfulfilled prophecy?  In laymen’s terms, unfulfilled prophecy means a prophecy that has not been fulfilled, carried out, or brought into completion yet.  In God’s timing—not our own theological schemes, His prophecies will be fulfilled.  And before I start to identify where the unfulfilled prophecies are, let me first take some time to clarify an area that I think needs more explanation (Barrick, 2).  The area of explanation has to do with the terms “altered” or “unrealized” prophecies, and “provisionally cancelled” prophecies.

When it comes to “altered” or “unrealized” prophecies, and “provisionally cancelled” prophecies, some will go to Jonah’s prophecies to substantiate their claims.  Jonah’s prophecy was predictive because it was concerning the destruction of Nineveh.  But here is the question people pose, “Is it still a predictive prophecy even though God withheld His judgment of Nineveh when they repented?” (Barrick, 2). I think the right question to ask is this, “Is the judgment, applied to Nineveh only or was is it tied to a specific generation? (Barrick, 2). It appears that the judgment of Nineveh was applied to a later generation (Barrick, 2).  As a result, this account that people see as an apparent lack of fulfillment was not a permanent lack of fulfillment (Barrick, 2).

Some will say Exodus 32:9-14 is another example of an apparent lack of fulfillment because God did not judge them.  It must be clear, that this is faulty reasoning that inherits conjectures.  The prophecy was still predictive and not altered or provisionally canceled in any manner, because God did ultimately judge and destroy the entire generation in the wilderness (Barrick, 2).  They only received postponement of punishment for a little while, but the wilderness was their doom (Barrick, 2). Exodus 32:34-35 says, “But go now, lead the people where I told you. Behold, My angel shall go before you; nevertheless in the day when I punish, I will punish them for their sin.  Then the Lord smote the people, because of what they did with the calf which Aaron had made” (NASB).  Psalm 106:19-23 and Deuteronomy 9:13-20, 25-29 recalls this event between Yahweh and the wilderness people too (Barrick, 2).

Another element I also would like to elaborate on before I start to identify where the unfulfilled prophecies are located, is the employment of אוּלַי, which means “perhaps or “maybe” (Barrick, 3).  This word can be located in Jeremiah 26:3 and Ezekiel 12:3.  When אוּלַ is used, it is more accurate to say that it is more hortatory as opposed to predictive (Barrick, 3).  Using this term in juxtaposition with אוּלַ can seem quite arbitrary.  But some will contest and say that there are certain prophecies that are contingent upon human stimuli (Barrick, 3). While there are some prophecies that are contingent upon human stimuli, one will have to analyze what kind of prophecy are we talking about?  We need to examine the prophesy in its context.  It is safe to say that when looking at many of the prophecies in the OT, most would be predictive rather than hortatory (Barrick, 3).

Another passage that some will try to use in order to establish the concept of the “so-called dynamic” prophecy is Micah’s speech in 3:12.  However, it must be noted that the impending judgment was fulfilled at a later time. Although the prophecies may be contingent upon human response, God’s promise to His covenant is firm.  He does not change His mind.  He is immutable when it comes to covenants or decrees.  It just happens that God uses humans sometimes as secondary causes to bring about His will.   The same applies to Jonah’s case.  Because of their repentance, in Jonah’s story, the judgment was withheld for a moment.  It was not revised or reapplied (Barrick, 3). It was just fulfilled at a later time, when the conditions that originally prompted the judgment resurfaced (Barrick, 3).

In addition, when it comes to the predictive discourse in Isaiah 40-55, which some incorrectly use: the term dynamic predictive discourse—fails  to see it as a section that focuses on repentance and salvation (Barrick, 3).  When analyzing Isaiah 40-55, I would not consider it a dynamic predictive discourse, but a predictive prophecy that has elements of the hortatory elements (Barrick, 3).   Isaiah tells them what the future of the Jewish people will be like if they respond in repentance (Barrick, 3).  Once they repent, salvation will be granted to them. Although this section of Isaiah is clearly not an example of an unfulfilled prophecy, I would not see it as a dynamic prophecy either.  This naming convention implies that if man responds not the way God desires—the prophecy is cancelled, altered, etc.  At the end of the day, God’s promises supersede human responses.  I see this as a prophecy that has both hortatory and predictive elements (Barrick 3).

On another note, one fundamental caricature about Isaiah’s prophecy and the other prophets mentioned is the depiction of Yahweh’s ability to accurately fulfill what He prophesies (Barrick, 4).  However, Yahweh stands in stark contrast to the false pagan gods in the ancient near eastern kingdoms because He is a God that fulfills what He promises (Barrick, 4).  He is not slow at His promises nor does He lie because that will go against His attributes.  He is also a God that acts in absolutely clear ways when bringing history to pass, (Barrick, 4).  He does it because He wants the nations to see how transcendent His Words are.  But a dynamic-non-performative perfection would not exalt God in this manner (Barrick, 4).

This now ultimately brings me to some of the examples of what unfulfilled contingent prophecies are. There are many examples, but I will only focus on two.  One cogent example would be the prophecy of Haggai (2:6-9), which centers on the glory of the temple.  This promise did not happen during Haggai’s time nor at any other period (Barrick, 5).  It will come to pass when He returns at His second coming.  This prophecy in the Book of Haggai, does not require an immediate promise, because contingency in this case is based on Christ’s return (Barrick, 5).

Psalm 89 is also another good example of an unfulfilled contingent prophecy.  In this chapter, God made promises to David that is filled with loyal love to him and his descendants.  But because of difficult circumstances, David becomes disillusioned with confusion and disappointment (Barrick, 5).  However, if you continue reading Psalm 89, David also acknowledges that God is a faithful covenant keeping God (Barrick, 6).  Basically, David knows that  God will fulfill what he promises.  What a sobering reminder for us.  May we have faith like David when difficult circumstances surround us.

On the grounds of an important point I made earlier: “In order to avoid the confusion regarding the apparent lack of fulfillment and the undermining of biblical inerrancy, I believe that such interlocking of the words dynamic and predictive discourse should be dichotomized, in order to have absolute identifiable terms.” This is significant because God expresses Himself in clear, absolute, and in identifiable ways.  And because He is also intrinsically holy, He will not alter nor change the promises that He has made.  Hence, we need to remember that no matter what circumstances occur, God will fulfill the promises He stated.

Here is part one of the series if you have not read it yet:

Is There a Lack of Fulfillment in God’s Prophecies? Part 1

Bibliography

William D., Barrick. “Response to Robert B. Chisholm, “Making Sense of Prophecy Recognizing the Presence of Contingency’”.” ETS Far West Region Annual Meeting (April 20, 2007): 1-8.

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The question:

Were only priests or members of the Levi tribes allowed to touch the ark of the Lord? Is that why Uzzah died in 2 Samuel 6? Or did he die because of some unknown sin in his life?

The Answer:

When it comes to transportation of the ark of the Covenant, only those in tribes of Levi and specially those of Kohath descendents were tasked with this duty. It is important that when we read the Old Testament narrative (which 2 Samuel 6 is), we need to have the Mosaic Law informs us as to what God wants His people to do. If we approach 2 Samuel 6 with Numbers 4 informing us of how God wants His ark to be transported, we see that in 2 Samuel 6 they were disobedient with the way God wants His ark transported. They are to cover the ark with a veil and apparently this point was important enough that the author repeats it three times (4:5,4:6a, 4:15a). Numbers 4:15 makes it clear that what happen in 2 Samuel 6 should not have been a surprise for the people, since Numbers 4:15 explains that the reason why the ark was covered was so that they would not touch the ark physically, lest they die. In contrast to the situation in 2 Samuel 6 where the ark was transported on a cart pulled by animals, Numbers 4:15 mandated that the sons of Kohath were to be the ones carrying the ark; the question would be, how do they do so without touching the ark? Numbers 4:6 mention that they are to “insert its poles,” suggesting the means was by inserting poles into holes in the Ark and thereby the sons of Kohath are to physically carry it by means of the poles. I think if we remember Numbers 4, it shows that the incident in 2 Samuel 6 should not have suprised the Jewish readers. I think there are lessons for us today that are still timely: If worship is really about God, we should worship Him the way He wants to be worshiped, and just because a way of worship appears to be popular does not mean all is okay if it goes against God’s requirement. Sobering.

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