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Archive for February 18th, 2014

Review: Lone Survivor

Lone Survivor

I have never read a book on the Navy SEALs, but I was glad that I finally read it.  Definitely as a reader, you have to be discerning when reading the book because on various occasions, much profanity was used.  As a result, I filtered out the bad and took in the good.  You read it for what it is worth.  As a footnote, the author claims allegiance to the Christian faith, but his use of language and beliefs contradicts that.  It makes me wonder if the Gospel is understood authentically by some of those in the SEAL community that claim the Christian heritage.

At any rate, what I appreciated about this book was its transparency in terms of the training it takes to be a SEAL, the training during your time as a SEAL, and Operation Redwing that Marcus and the three other SEALs were involved. The author went to great lengths in describing all three foundational key moments that make up most of the bulk of the book.  I encourage readers who do not know much about SEAL life or those who aspire to be SEALs to read this book because Marcus goes to great details describing all three foundational aspects.

In regards to the training it takes to be a SEAL, Marcus takes you to BUD/S, which is a 6-month training course that test not only the physical component, but the mental component as well.  It is very fascinating in terms of the mentality you need in order to get through the training.  Everyday was pain for Marcus and the other men, but it was pain that was necessary in order to mend the men to be ready for SEAL life.  The only easy day was yesterday.

After BUD/S training, the training continues and is still demanding–although it is not like Hell Week, which is excruciating.  Another point to take mental note is the fact that the SEALs are not uneducated men, but they are intelligent men who are educated in other disciplines and men who are also highly trained in the art of war.  The different phases of training is staggering.  No wonder the majority of people fail to make it as SEALs.

The most eye-opening account is Operation Redwing whereby Marcus and three other SEALs are sent out to do a reconnaissance concerning a highly prolific terrorist figure who was responsible for the deaths of many Marines.  As the men go out on a reconnaissance, their mission becomes compromised because they were discovered by goatherds. To make the long story short, the SEALs decide the let the goatherds go freely.  Once they were freed, the goatherds went and told the terrorists; and that is when the hunt begins.  A hunt that led to the death of Michael P. Murphy, Matthew Axelson, Danny Dietz, other SEALs, and special ops personnels who attempted to rescue them, but were shot down while in a helicopter.  There is much that can be said about this book, but I just wanted to provide a brief summary.

If there is one major principle that I learned about this book is this:  courage, loyalty, and commitment.    As a Christian, many of those principles are imbedded in my Christian heritage.  If these men were bold enough to take on death, I as a Christian should be more propelled to go head strong against death because the Lord is with me.  I know where I will be when I take my last breath.  I am glad that I read this book and that I was able to extract some principles that will help me in my Christian walk.

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