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Archive for February, 2016

The Flow of the Psalms

Palmer Robertson. The Flow of the Psalms.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, May 15th, 2015. 304 pp.

Before I read this book I didn’t know what to make of the way the Psalms were laid out which was largely due to my own personal difficulty in discerning the reason for the Psalms’ arrangement.  This book convinced me that there is definitely a flow in the Psalter.  It is packed with a lot of information, that even after I finished reading it I realized I probably have forgotten a lot more than I could remember.  I think it is worth purchasing even as a reference which I plan to use in this manner in the future whenever I study or preach from the Psalms.

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D G Hart

Over at Christian historian Dr. Hart’s website, “Old Life,” he recently has a post titled “Would You Let Your Wife Be a Physician?” in which he responded to Christian blogger Tim Challies’ article “Sex on the Silver Screen.”  Challies makes a good point about Christians not watching sexual immorality on film but Dr. Hart didn’t like the following argument from Challies, which Hart describes as “the skin test to movies to argue against watching a performance that involves bare breasts:”

What would it take for you to be okay with your wife participating in that scene? Would you send her off to work tomorrow knowing that she would be topless for hours at a time, that she would be rolling around on a bed with another man as a crew looked on, as they adjusted the lighting, as they practiced different angles, as the director instructed her, “No, put your hands there. Move in that way…” She would not be having sex with him, but she would be doing her best to act like it, to make others believe it. She would be taking all she knows of the movements, the motion, the pleasure of sex with you and imitating it with this other man. Wife, what would it take for you to be okay with your husband stripping her and kissing her and carrying her to bed? My guess is that you cannot imagine any scenario in which that would be tolerable, in which that would be moral and right. Now hold onto that conviction for a moment.

I think Challies made a good point.  But Hart didn’t think so:

Why exactly is this a slam dunk?

Consider women who serve as physicians and examine men’s private parts (among others) for a living. Why doesn’t the skin test apply to careers in medicine? Heck, what about nurses who bathe men in hospital beds?

And it’s not just a question of exposed flesh. If we made comfort with-what-the-missus does a standard for engaging with the world, what do we do with a woman who is a defense attorney and represents people she knows to be guilty before the law? Or for those complimentarians out there, what do you do when your wife serves in the military? Leave the OPC?

The point is that we all have different standards for different levels of engaging the world.

Here’s my thoughts on Hart’s curious response:

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These are Presuppositional apologetics’ links gathered between February 15th-21st, 2015.

1.) Apologetic Sermon Illustration #31: Transcendental Argument illustrated with Anti-Cop Rapper Has Life Saved by Cop

2.) Our knowledge must depend on God’s knowledge

3.) Evangelism Demands a Presuppositional Defense

4.) Bahnsen on the Role of Reason

5.) Because Jesus Christ is Risen Things Can Change

6.) A Page to Ponder #7

 

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fellowshipThis verse really leaped out to me earlier this week:

Take care, brethren, that there not be in any one of you an evil, unbelieving heart [c]that falls away from the living God. 13 But encourage one another day after day, as long as it is still called “Today,” so that none of you will be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

(Hebrews 3:12-13)

Verse 12 gives the statement that there ought not to be an unbelieving heart.  Verse 13 gives the antidote.  The call is to “encourage one another day after day” with the reason being stated as “so that none of you will be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.”

Fellowship, Biblical fellowship that is, is a means of God’s grace against unbelief.  It is probably not often thought of it in that perspective among those who are engaged in apologetics.  But it definitely states it in Hebrews 3:12-13.

Off to church now to be encouraged and encourage others’ faith!

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error

This is actually my fifth posts in my series responding to some arguments against inerrancy.  I was mistaken last week to say that I only had two posts.  Today’s objection we shall look at is as follows:

However, no where is it written, in any verse of any chapter of any book of either Hebrew or Christian Bible that ‘scripture’ equals ‘infallible’ or ‘inerrant’!  What it does say is that God’s words are flawless (Psa 12:6), His Law is perfect (Psa 19:7), that His word will not return to Him void (Isa 55:11), that His words will all be fulfilled (Matt 5:18) and that all scripture is profitable for teaching (2 Tim 3:16).  However, it should be crystal clear that not every word written in the scriptures (whether Jewish or Christian) were the very words of God, so they do not all have the same claim to flawlessness.

Here’s my response:

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This Republic of Suffering

Drew Gilpin Faust. This Republic of Suffering.  New York, NY: Knopf, January 8th, 2008. 368 pp.

This books look on the subject of death during the American Civil War.  The author made the point that the business of dying and also taking of life is work. From this point the writer explores the cultural, social and spiritual aspect of death during the war and also how the war changed people’s perceptions about death, life and spirituality.

I found the book insightful with how the author described the pre-war Victorian era assumption of the good death that involves dying at home among family members.  The author also noted that this scenery of the good death was not only important for the person dying but also for the surviving family members and friends who were present since they could evaluate the destiny of the person’s eternity from how a person dies.  It is assumed that on one’s dying bed a person would be more honest and thus reveal whether the person dying have been right with God and ready for the eternal state.  It is a means of comfort to observe someone’s parting moment.  Of course the importance of dying in a familiar domestic areas and among familiar people of course was interrupted by the war, in which soldiers died in strange areas among strangers in horrific manners.  We see here people trying to adjust to that in how fellow soldiers wrote about another’s soldiers’ death to surviving loved ones, giving clues to whether or not that person was at peace in anticipation of eternity and doctors and nurses writing about the last moments of a wounded soldier.  The author noted that among these letters there is a strong desire to be honest and yet comforting to the families.

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Funny video.

I think it shows how people can end up doing the very thing we accuse others of doing against our ethnicity.

I think grace is needed all around.

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