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Archive for the ‘Batman’ Category

A break from heavy theological posts!  I want to thank DC comics for this advance review copy.

Tom King.  Batman, Volume 2: I Am Suicide. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, April 18th, 2017. 168 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is volume two of the new Batman series in the DC rebirth series.  It picks up where volume one left off in which Gotham Girl is need of help; specifically in order for Batman to help her he needs to find Psycho-Pirate to restore her mental state.  But for Batman to get Psycho-Pirate this requires Batman to go on an adventure outside of Gotham.

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Sometimes even Pastors need a break from heavy theological reading…hence this review.

If you enjoyed this review you also might want to check out my Review and Christian Reflections of my favorite works on Batman.

batman-detective-comics-volume-1-rise-of-the-batmen

James Tynion IV.  Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 1: Rise of the Batmen. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, February 14th, 2017. 128 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

From what little I know about DC Comics I believe their “Detective Comics” series is the longest series in comic book history and that’s largely due to the character Batman.  This is volume one of Detective Comics as part of DC Comics’ relaunched called “Rebirth” that started in 2016.  I’m still quite the rookie when it comes to Batman and this is the first Batman I read in the Detective Comics series and thus far I’m enjoying it.

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I’m thankful for DC Comics allowing me to review this new volume!

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Tom King.  Batman, Volume 1: I Am Gotham. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, January 11th, 2017. 192 pp.

4 out of 5

Over the last year and a half I have really become a fan of Batman.  So as a new fan I could not wait to get my hands on this new Batman work titled “I am Gotham.”  This particular work is volume one in the new Batman in DC Comics’ 2016 relaunch which they have called “Rebirth.”  With this graphic novel as my first exposure to DC Comic’s Rebirth universe I must say that I’m excited to read and explore what else DC is doing with their other titles.

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Another weekend light reading review.  Why?  Because even pastors need a mental break…batman-hush

Jeph Loeb.  Batman: Hush. New York, NY: DC Comics, August 18th, 2009. 320 pp.

4 out of 5

This was a fun read.  I do appreciate the writer Jeph Loeb for his storytelling in other comic books especially in BATMAN: THE LONG HALLOWEEN.  In fact I decided to read this book largely because of Jeph Loeb was the author.  I also appreciated the artist Jim Lee.  There’s a movie feel to the angles and dramatic poses of Batman.

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Frank Miller Batman The Dark Knight Returns

Frank Miller. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns. New York, NY: DC Comics, May 1st, 1997. 224 pp.

I’ve previously read the author’s work on Batman titled Batman: Year One.  That book was such a good story that I had high expectation of this book and I wasn’t disappointed.  I enjoyed this Graphic Novel.

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The following below are the graphic novels or comics I did finished but for one reason or another it wasn’t on my list of exceptional works, hence my delay in reviewing them earlier in 2015.  Just for the record there’s many comics and graphic novels that I didn’t finished because it was either not that good of a story or because it was inappropriate.  So for me to finish a graphic novel requires a lot, unlike my reading with non-fictions, which I typically can’t stand the idea of not finishing.  Also with all my discussions of worldviews, there’s time where the reading was just for enjoyment.  I’ve arranged the order of these reviews from what I most enjoyed to the least satisfied.

The Shadow Hero

The Shadow Hero

Gene Yang. The Shadow Hero. New York, NY: First Second, July 15th, 2014. 169 pp.

5 out of 5

It’s hard to find a good graphic novel involving superheroes that has good story telling, original, nice artwork, meaningful and also appropriate and clean that you can really recommend to people of all ages.  This is one of them.  It is not so childish that it’s beyond adults or teenagers reading them either.  I really enjoyed this book and I picked it up to read because of who authored it.  This book certainly didn’t disappoint.  I love this story about a hero and how it touches on the Chinese American experience: it has reference to Chinese immigrants coming to America, a son who is born in America and raised by traditional Chinese parents in an ethnic enclave of China town in an urban city.  Readers of Asian American descent will have a kick and the story is told in such a way that all can follow and appreciate.  I like how the author and illustrator also tells us the background to why they told this story and apparently there was a “Green Turtle” superhero during the 1940s that mysteriously died out as much as it mysteriously started.  Very fun read and I highly recommend it.

Purchase:Amazon

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This is part of our short series on Superheroes, Comics and Worldview.  The following are comics that I found intriguing in that they have a political overtone and message.  Specifically they warn the readers of the danger of Statism.

V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

Alan Moore. V for Vendetta. New York, NY: DC Comics, October 12th, 2005. 296 pp.

I read this nearly a year ago back in January and it still left a strong impression on my mind.  I can only compare to this to George Orwell’s 1984.  It is a 1984 with a superhero, if V could be called that.  Originally written in the 1980s it is a story about a future England in 1997 and 1998 in which the government has become tyrannical and authoritarian with a sole dictator on top who is obsessed with his computer dictating to him things by chance.  As powerful and smart as those within government think they are, one lone vigilante suddenly challenges all that.  What’s incredible is that our hero goes about doing what he does while singing, rhyming and throwing out witty slogans.  This shows the incredible genius of the writer Alan Moore and he even manage to alliterate each section of the book with the letter V.  Incredible.  As our hero carry his subversive campaign to undermine the evil government and cause the people to rise up we are also drawn into the story in learning more of the mystery of the origin of V and his motivation to fight the regime.  Although the story does have a bit of the left leaning taste there is still a powerful lesson about the dangers of Statism.

Christian Reflection: 

As I said earlier this book does have the same feel as 1984.  This reminds us just how dark a tyrannical government can be and how the mass could simply let the government do the evils they do.  While our hero is a lone revolutionary as a Christian we must not believe in vigilante justice or call for the rebellious overthrow of the government.  This of course is different from the duties of the lower magistrate to disobey wrongful orders from their superiors.  Christians must be very careful not to subscribe to the pagan ideology that chaos (revolution) will reproduce order.

NOTE: I did not watch the movie nor do I plan on reading it.

Purchase:Amazon

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