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Archive for the ‘new testament’ Category

This is a series of lectures titled “How Can We Trust the Bible?” delivered by Michael Kruger, president of Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte. If you follow this blog for any amount of time you might recognized the name of this scholar for we have shared other resources from him before.  For instance see Four Lectures on the Canon by Michael J. Kruger (Free MP3s!) and Video: Michael Kruger on What It Means That the Bible Is Self-Authenticating.

This particular lecture series was presented at Christ Community Church Wilmington.

It consists of 3 lectures and 2 Q&A.

Check it out below:

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Benjamin Reaoch. Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate : a Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, August 17th 2012. 193 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

Christian theologian John Frame once said that “The discussion of the man-woman relationship has greatly intensified since the 1970s.”  I think Frame is right.  Much discussion has been ongoing and many books have been written on the topic.  Different movements have also arise over the decades.  One such movement focuses more on the hermeneutics of how we approach the Scriptures and how we interpret passages concerning the relationship of man and woman.  It is called the redemptive-movement with William Webb being the notable leader of the group.  While different people affiliated with this movement may differ in some of their conclusion nevertheless we can safely say that their hermeneutics lead them to the conclusion of egalitarianism.  This is a book length critique of the movement from a Complementarian perspective.

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Jon C. Laansma and Randall X. Gauthier. The Handy Guide to Difficult and Irregular Greek Verbs: AIDS for Readers of the Greek New Testament.  Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, September 26th 2017. 80 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

In my opinion one of the best thing I got from my education in seminary was picking up the original languages of the Scriptures; other places such as the church might be better to prepare for other skillset for those entering the ministry but for most people the languages is probably the most helpful thing one can get in seminary that isn’t as easy to learn “on the job” or through self-study alone.  However it is a skill that can easily be lost if one doesn’t engage in expository preaching or work with the biblical languages in other ways.  It is with this perspective that I appreciate this new resource from Kregel Academic titled The Handy Guide to Difficult and Irregular Greek Verbs: AIDS for Readers of the Greek New Testament.

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A few days an old man died.  An old man who was in his 90s who was born in the 1920s.  The world noticed.  His name was Hugh Hefner; just saying his name most people would know who he was and what he stood for.

This same month another man also died.  He too was a man born in the 1920s.  Most people in the world would not know who he was or what he was about.  His name was Robert Thomas, a New Testament scholar and professor who for decades taught Greek, heremeneutics, exegesis and New Testament theology.

Two men so close in age yet two men who were worlds apart.

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A weekend nonfiction review!  Cause even ministers need breaks from heavy theological reading!

Tom Standage.  Writing on the Wall.  New York, NY: Bloomsbury USA, October 15th 2013. 288 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This was a fascinating book on social media.  As the subtitle states this book is on the first two thousand years of social media.  You might be scratching your head like I did at first with the idea of social media having been around for the last two millennium but I think the author Tom Standage made a good point that social media has been around for some time though it might not look like the social media we have today. We must not confuse our idea of social media that is based upon technologies such as the internet, websites and high speed connection with the social media that has been existent in the past.

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On the one hand I appreciate that atheist and skeptic Bart Ehrman has written a book that argues for the historical existence of Jesus.  On the other hand the book is not without its problems.

Here are all our posts that exposes the fallacious reasoning in Ehrman’s book.

Bart Ehrman On Critics’ Alleged Mutually Exclusive Claims

Bart Ehrman’s Schizophrenic Misrepresentation of Fundamentalists’ view of Inspiration and Bible’s Historicity

Bart Ehrman’s Fallacious Argument from Silence in his book, “Did Jesus Exist?”

Bart Ehrman’s Claim: Jews didn’t deny other gods’ existence?

Bart Ehrman Questioning the Historicity of Jesus’ Triumphant Entry Part 1

Bart Ehrman Questioning the Historicity of Jesus’ Triumphant Entry Part 2

 

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Note: If your pastor prepares his sermon from the Greek New Testament and you want a recommendation of what to get him for Christmas, I recommend this work.

a-syntax-guide-for-readers-of-the-greek-new-testament

Charles Lee Irons. A Syntax Guide for Readers of the Greek New Testament.  Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, July 27th 2016.  608 pp.

This is a great work for reference for preachers and students of the Greek New Testament.  The book examines the Greek New Testament text at the level of syntactical observations and when appropriate several possible interpretations.  The author Charles Lee Irons wrote this work with the intent of going beyond merely parsing Greek verbs and declining Greek nouns but at the stage of interpretation involving phrases, clauses and sentences.  This work is helpful for those who want a single volume providing this kind of observation from the Greek text.  Why is this important?  As Irons wrote in the introduction, “Analysis of syntax often entails making judgments about the various uses of a certain grammatical form, giving rise to a particular meaning in that context” (9).

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