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Archive for the ‘Christology’ Category

Shepherd’s Conference (a conference for Pastors and Preachers) was a few weeks ago with the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and the theme of “We Preach Christ.”  Some of you who were not there still was able to enjoy the General Sessions because the Conference graciously livestreamed them.  However the various seminar sessions are what some people are looking forward to whether you were in the conference or not since they were more specific and occurred simultaneously with other seminar sessions.  Since there are 19 of them they are something that’s going to take some to time for me to listen through!

I know the official Shepherd’s Conference website says “Media Coming Soon” but the Audio MP3s of the seminar sessions can be downloaded by clicking on the title of the sessions below:

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I appreciate Reformed Theological Seminary doing these videos for their #WisdomWednesday series which different faculty answers different questions in short video interview formats.

I appreciate Dr. Kruger’s contribution in understanding the Canon and also apologetics.

Here in this video he answers the question: “Did Jesus claim to be God?”

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My first book review for 2017!

god-the-son-incarnate

Stephen J. Wellum. God the Son Incarnate.  Wheaton, IL: Crossway, November 30th 2016.  480 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

This book is a part of Crossway’s Foundations of Evangelical Theology series.  I appreciated the series overall and this work on Christology is now among my top favorites in the series.  It is quite a meaty work and reading it was no small undertaking.  Reading this book makes me appreciate just how much Christian scholarship exists and how much that I still need to tap into.  I learned a lot reading this book.  In my opinion I think Stephen Wellum’s work is ideal as a seminary text book and for those who desire to seriously study the doctrines related to Christ more deeply.  In this review I am going to first summarize each parts and chapters of the book and end with some brief constructive criticisms.

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I’m excited by what I found this evening!  For those of you who have Amazon Prime Ligoner Ministries have made a teaching series by RC Sproul available titled “What Did Jesus Do?: Understanding the Work of Christ.”  It is a series of Twelve 23-Minute Messages. with over 4 Hours of Teaching.  On their website they sell the DVD series for over 40 dollars so if you have Amazon Prime this is something edifying and worthwhile.

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Why Meditating on Christ Helps Us Fight Sin

Last week I wrote a post titled “How does the biblical doctrines of Christology help us have a more godly marriage?”  Of course studying Christ will impact all areas of the Christian life and not just marriage.  It has never ceased to amaze me how meditating and studying Christ have produced godliness in the lives of believers.  This is the case because the person and works of Christ become powerful motivations for the Christian fighting against sin.

Concerning my previous mentioned post, I realize sometimes people find some of my posts are too long to read at the moment.  So here’s a a witty ditty for your theology.  Or more precisely, here’s a witty ditty for your memory that hopefully remind you why meditating on Christ helps you fight against sin.  Are you ready for it?  Here it is:

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Angel of the Lord Christophany

I do think the instances in the Bible in which there are manifestations of the Divine Angel of the Lord in the Old Testament it is probably Christ.  One such incident of the Angel of the Lord appearing happened to Hagar in Genesis 16:7-14. I believe this is the first time the Divine Angel of the Lord appears in Genesis.  For the purpose of this post let me quote the passage:

Now the angel of the Lord found her by a spring of water in the wilderness, by the spring on the way to Shur. He said, “Hagar, Sarai’s maid, where have you come from and where are you going?” And she said, “I am fleeing from the presence of my mistress Sarai.” Then the angel of the Lord said to her, “Return to your mistress, and submit yourself [a]to her authority.” 10 Moreover, the angel of the Lord said to her, “I will greatly multiply your [b]descendants so that [c]they will be too many to count.” 11 The angel of the Lord said to her further,

“Behold, you are with child,
And you will bear a son;
And you shall call his name [d]Ishmael,
Because the Lord [e]has given heed to your affliction.
12 “He will be a wild donkey of a man,
His hand will be against everyone,
And everyone’s hand will be against him;
And he will [f]live [g]to the east of all his brothers.”

13 Then she called the name of the Lord who spoke to her, “[h]You are [i]a God who sees”; for she said, “Have I even [j]remained alive here after seeing Him?” 14 Therefore the well was called [k]Beer-lahai-roi; behold, it is between Kadesh and Bered.

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How does the biblical doctrines of Christology help us have a more godly marriage

Does studying about the person of Christ actually help Christians in Christian marriages?  Yes it should!  How?  Read on!

  1. Purpose: In this series we explore how theology shapes marriage and here in our fourth session we shall consider how does the doctrines of the person of Christ helps us have a more godly marriage.

In the following outline we shall be considering three truths about the person of Christ followed by what are the implications of that towards Christian marriage.

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Jesus the Son of God D A Carson

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

This short work is an adaptation of three lectures that became the three chapters of this book, focusing on the title of Jesus as the Son of God. At the outset, the author explain that much of the discussion of the Son of God in contemporary scholarship focuses on it’s implication for Trinitarian theology but here he wishes to explore more of the idea of Christ as the Son of God in of itself. I enjoyed the book, especially with how Carson began this study with what the concept of “son.” Besides biological son, Carson noted how there are many “son of X” idioms with various variables of its function, ranging from identity, deserving and generating. The first chapter has various helpful charts showing different “son of X” idioms and how some of these are not translated in our English versions of the Bible but it is there in the Greek or Hebrew. It is in this context that Carson then unpacks the use of the Son of God in reference to Jesus in which the New Testament uses it to refer to His pre-existence, His Davidic root to the Messianic promise and as the Suffering Servant. Carson mentions several times that he can only look at a few passages due to space limitation but I wish he could have surveyed more passages in chapter, not because I didn’t think he did a good job but because he is capable and there is much to gleam from the passages he did analyze. I think the one thing I most appreciate about this book is D.A. Carson’s discussion about the role of exegesis, systematic theology, linguistics and Bible translations in the third chapter. While this last chapter mainly focuses on this discussion in the context of the translation of the Son of God in Bible versions used to reach Muslims, the implication of this chapter transcends Bible translation for Muslims. He notes how systematic theology without strong exegesis can be problematic, with the example of the doctrine of the eternal generation of the Son of God as Berkhof attempt to establish. Noting various exegetical error by Berkhof, Carson here notes that the eternal generation of the Son by the Father is best anchored in John 5:16-30 with it’s main point in 5:26. Carson’s treatment of John 5:16-30 in chapter two to establish the eternal generation of the Father is excellent and shows how advance doctrines of God can be established on exegetical lines. Yet one must have the maturity of being balanced with understanding the philosophical bent of theology in helping us explain concepts such as the Trinity and why the Church fathers employed philosophical language to sharpen distinctions and clarity so as to avoid heresies. Chapter three is an excellent apologetics for why translators should translate “Son of God” in a Muslim context, and a refutation of reader response theory form of translation philosophy. While I don’t want to give everything away, some of the highlights that I appreciated include his argument that the concept of Jesus as the Son of God is radically foreign no matter what the non-Christian cultural context is, even in the West’s pre-Christian and post-Christian era. There is something that is loss if we fail to translate the Son of God terminology in our translations since this term is quite theologically rich and have greater continuity in terms of the Bible’s inter-textuality. I appreciated the chapter closing with an appeal for Bible translators not to be only narrowly focused on linguistics but also exegesis, biblical and systematic theology. His parting words also encouraged me to see Bible translations in the context of a biblical missiology: “…the spread of the gospel in the early church saw the dissemination of Scripture along with the provision of missionaries and pastors. One wonders if at least some of the tensions over Bible translation springs from the commitment on the part of some to provide adequate translations without simultaneously providing missionaries and pastors” (108-09). Overall, a great book and one that shows how some books are physically small but packs a big punch.

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Imagine powerhouse theologians Ligon Duncan, Sinclair Ferguson, Robert Godfrey, Stephen Nichols, Richard Pratt, and R.C.Sproul all in one place having a discussion about Christology today!  Now watch this video.

I appreciated the Presbyterian Church of America and Ligonier making this available!

(HT: Jeff Downs)

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