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Archive for the ‘Reformed’ Category

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These are links from the internet on Presuppositional Apologetics gathered between May 15th-21st, 2015.

1.) Defeating the Fuming Foolishness of New Atheism

2.) Apologetics and Your Kids (6) – Avoiding Lazy Thinking

3.) The “real” problem with miracles

4.) More Spalled Concrete

5.) How does an atheist measure evil?

6.) Q&A With Francis and Edith Schaeffer: 1984 SOUNDWORD LABRI CONFERENCE

 

Missed the last round up?  Check out the re-blogged post from a friend

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Traces of the Trinity Signs of God in Creation and Human Experience by Peter J Leithart

 Peter Leithart. Traces of the Trinity: Signs of God in Creation and Human Experience.  Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Publishing Group, March 17th, 2015. 176 pp.

While the title of the book is “Traces of the Trinity,” this book is not so much about the Trinity per se as it is on the Trinitarian doctrine of perichoresis (the persons of the Trinity are mutually dwelling among each other while still remaining distinct persons).  To be even more specific the author Peter Leithart is not merely examining the doctrine of perichoresis but an exploration of how there are traces of analogous “indwelling” found within God’s creation and creatures; and that we best account for these phenomenon in God’s creation and creatures from a Trinitarian worldview.  I found this a surprisingly delightful read and in agreement with the thesis of the book.

Leithart is a professor of literature and his literary abilities shows.  Readers won’t be bored with what he has to say.  His witty manner of writing along with his wordsmith that paints powerful word pictures is similar to C.S. Lewis or Chesterton.  I would also add that I am aware of concerns for the author’s theology in other areas and in particular with his soteriology and association with Federal Vision.  I suppose my comparison of Leithart to Lewis and Chesteron does not end with their wonderful ability to write but also as writers whom I read for their keen insights while also realizing I need to be doctrinally discerning.

While this book is an exercise of applying a Trinitarian worldview, I did not expect that Leithart would be able to beautifully present his case in the manner that he did.  This book is not a dry account of the Trinity nor is it the typical Van Tillian rehearsed presentation of the problem of the “One and the Many.”  I imagine Leithart is familiar with the Van Tillian Trinitarian project given how he’s well read, is conversant with Reformed Theology and have endnotes citing John Frame and his perspectivalism.  Yet Leithart’s discussion of Trinitarian worldview accounting for our reality has an originality that has a rhetorical beauty about it.

I was hooked right away with the first chapter with how Leithart tackles Cartesian dualism and refutes Descartes’ notion that the self is totally separated from the world which is so common of an assumption today since modernity (and post-modernity).  Leithart makes the powerful observation that the individual thinking person (the self) is inter-connected with the world and vice versa.  I love the book’s illustration about the windo having certain properities and yet it can’t be a window in its essence if it in not standing in relations to other things in the world such as a house and the outside world.  The author notes the same thing is true with coffee cup and even the self.  We as humans are in physical bodies which require the outside world such as food, oxygen, etc and thus the world indwell within the self while the self is also in the world.  Leithart then moves on to make an analogous observation of this mutual indwelling with thought and the world as well (thought require content of the outside world, etc).

In a similar fashion, Leithart also has a wonderful discussion about the problem of the tension between the ultimacy of either the individual versus society, political and economic versus sociology.  It was a bit remincient of Rushdoony’s Trinitarian work The One and the Many which he applies the Trinity as a solution to the philosophical problem of the One and the Many largely in its application to politics and history.  But Leithart does it in a more concise manner.  He also refutes Hobbes and Locke in a way that I found refreshing and different!

Leithart’s observation of the Trinitarian traces of indwelling also looks at love, time, philosophy of language, music, ethics, and rationality.  In the final chapter he ties all the loose ends by a fuller discussion of the Trinity.  His postscript in which he deals with objection against his argument must also not be missed.  No doubt some might be reading this review and ask if Leithart’s thesis is sustainable in light of the difference of the Triune God from His creation and creatures.  Leithart acknowledges the need to preserve the doctrine of Creator/creature distinction but also not the importance of understanding God’s creation accurately along with the importance of understanding the doctrine of analogy (in the Van Tillian sense).  He doesn’t just make philosophical moves and over-reach with the use of biblical analogies but instead notes the Scripture does appeal to the Intra-Trinitarian relationships to apply something to God’s creature or creation.

I do recommend the book.  Even among all the books out there in recent years with an Evangelical revival of Trinitarian theology, this book does have something refreshing to say.  Again, when I recommend this book I recommend it with the same spirit I recommend people the works of Chesterton: read with doctrinal and biblical discernment.

NOTE: This book was provided to me free by Brazos Publishing Group and Net Galley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.

Purchase: Amazon

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southern seminary

I am thankful that Southern Seminary makes the Doctoral dissertation available online for free in electronic format as a PDF.

An interesting doctoral dissertation in apologetics is titled “A Christian Worldview Apologetic Engagement with Advaita Vedanta Hinduism.”  It was written by Pradeep Tilak in 2013.  I found it fascinating since there’s a need for more Christian apologetics dealing with Eastern religions.

Here’s is the abstract of the dissertation with description of the chapters:

This dissertation applies the principles of Worldview apologetics to engage Advaita Vedanta Hinduism with the biblical responses of Christianity.

Chapter 1 introduces the biblical mandate for apologetics, reviewing the contemporary apologetic scene. It highlights methodological principles in Worldview apologetics.

Chapter 2 introduces Vedanta Hinduism through the teachings of Sankara, Ramanuja, and Madhva.

Chapter 3 examines Christian rapprochement and antithesis with Vedanta Hinduism. The apologist applies Worldview apologetics in understanding the access points and biblical dividing lines.

Chapter 4 commences the apologetic engagement with proof. The Advaitin presents the monistic worldview and the ultimate reality, otherwise known as Brahman. The foundational Christian worldview is represented with the scriptures, God, man, and his salvation in Jesus Christ.

Chapter 5 addresses the offense part of apologetics. The adherents of each worldview contrast their viewpoints against the viewpoint of the other system. Vedanta’s monism, impersonal reality, inclusivity, and rationality are contrasted with Christianity’s historic self-revelation of God to man.

Chapter 6 handles apologetic defense through the lens of experience, epistemology, and correspondence with reality. The Hindu worldview has transcending experience, supra-rational epistemology, and deep coherence. The Christian admits a transitory universe, which has no existence as a contingent creation, apart from God.

Chapter 7 reviews Worldview apologetic practice under metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. These deal with the ontology of reality in its manifestations and our understanding of the truth. It concludes with how we live out this knowledge today.

Chapter 8 addresses the personal, rather than technical tone of apologetics. Kierkegaard’s engagement of the stubborn will helps us understand the radical nature of convictions. After presenting the Gospel worldview, the Vedanta position is shown to be impossible from those very paths that the Hindu trusts.

Chapter 9 culminates the study of Gospel-centered apologetics. The Gospel forms the core of the apologetic encounter, in content and methodology. This dissertation opens the venue for more sound arguments to be built around the Gospel and to tear down false worldviews.

Chapter 10 makes final recommendations on practical Christian apologetics to Hindus. A biblically self-aware approach is commended to honor God in the defense of the faith.

To access the PDF click HERE.

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Tree tunnel

These are links gathered between May 8th-14th, 2015.

1.) Twenty Ways to Answer A Fool [16]

2.) Video: Answering A Fool, by Dr. Greg Bahnsen

3.) Learning Analytic Philosophy

4.) THE POTATO SALAD FALLACY

5.) Has Epistemology hijacked Apologetics? or toward a Heideggerian apologetic

 

Missed the last round up?  Check out the re-blogged post from a friend

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prpbooks-images-covers-Piety

Joel Beeke. Piety: The Heartbeat of Reformed Theology.  Piety Phillipsburg, NJ:
Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, April 17th, 2015. 40 pp.

I have benefited greatly from the works of the author Joel Beeke who has been a great example of how one can be doctrinally strong, historically rooted while also embracing sound “experiential religion” with holy sanctification.  That was what compelled me to read this booklet since I wanted to be edified by Beeke’s summary of what biblical piety is.  I think he manages to do that in forty pages and surprisingly eighty two footnotes!

At the outset Beeke indicate his awareness that tday the term “piety” often has the connotation of a self-righteous “holier-than-thou” attitude.  This however is not consistent with what the Bible teaches nor faithful to Reformed theology.  Instead as Beeke tells us in the booklet “Reformed theologians viewed piety as the heartbeat of their theology of godly living” (Kindle Location 18).   Beeke surveys the work of John Calvin, William Ames and Gisbertus Voetius as exemplars of the Reformed faith who also advocated a form of pietism.  Reformed piety must not be confused with “Pietism” that is often associated with later German origins which stresses the importance of right action but has a low regard for doctrines and theology.  Instead Beeke’s thesis is that the historical Reformed and Biblical understanding of piety is one in which sound theology is the source for Christian living.  For instance, we live as our supreme goal for the glory of God and this also mean our piety ought to be for the glory of God.

I don’t want to give the whole book away but I also want to add that Beeke end with some practical pointers and biblical instruction to develop true piety.  I think this booklet is helpful and the cost of it is reasonable.

NOTE: This book was provided to me free by P&R Publishing and Net Galley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

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Greg Bahnsen sitting down

I think one of the best Christian apologist of the last half of the last Century was Greg Bahnsen.  He was a skilled debater and lecturer on Presuppositional Apologetics!  We have shared many resources from him on our blog.  All you have to do is type in his name under search.

Here’s another one of him speaking on how to answer a fool:

Enjoy!

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Van Til Defender of the Faith An Authorized Biography

William White. Van Til, Defender of the Faith.  Nashville, TN:
Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, 1979. 233 pp.

The work is primarily a brief biographical sketch of the life of Cornelius Van Til. It is good sometimes for serious disciples of Van Til’s apologetics or those curious to know the background of Van Til’s life and the historical development that led to Van Til’s ideas. Reading this book, one can not help but to think about the soverignty of God as He orchestrated the timing of various Dutch Reformed thinkers who shaped Van Til, and events leading to the founding of Westminster Seminary. The book was not intended to be read as a robust defense of Van Tillian apologetics, but rather as a biography laced with sentimental values antidotes.  However, the two appendix in the book features a good summary outline by Van Til himself of his apologetics, and a paper he delivered that expouse his ideas. Those who are out looking for Van Til’s ideas will find the two appendix to be precious gems.

I must add though that John Frame think this book is rather simplistic concerning its treatment of Van Til’s ideas.  Since it has been a long time since I read this book (I’m posting this review up because it’s been sitting for years on draft) Frame might be right.  This was one of the first biography of Van Til written and since this work was published another one put out by Presbyterian and Reformed has provided a more scholarly biography of him by a capable historian of the OPC.  Nevertheless, I did enjoyed this biography as well for its personal flavor.

Purchase: Amazon

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