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Archive for the ‘David Powlison’ Category

David Powlison. Worry: Pursuing a Better Path to Peace.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, March 1st 2004. 30 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

This is a counseling booklet on the topic of worrying.  It is a part of a series published by Presbyterian and Reformed called “Resources for Changing Lives” which feature booklets on various biblical counseling issues.  While some of the booklets in the series could be very specific and tailored for particular individuals going through certain issues such as A.D.D, OCD, self-injury and suicidal thoughts, I thought this booklet on worry would definitely be useful to a larger amount of people since every one of us struggle with worrying in one degree or another about something.

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I plan the next few weeks to look at some practical counseling booklets and post my reviews of them on here.

stress-peace-amid-pressure-by-david-powlison

David Powlison. Stress: Peace Amid Pressure.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, July 1st, 2004. 28 pp.

4 out of 5

This is a counseling booklet that’s part of the series published by Presbyterian and Reformed called “Resources for Changing Lives.”  I thought this work is a great resource for Pastors to assign as a reading assignment for someone they are counseling on the topic of stress.  I read through this short work for my own edification and also alongside another brother at church.

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Anger Escaping the Maze

You can get this booklet for 22% off for a limited time at WTS Bookstore if you click HERE.

I love these counseling booklets series “Resources for Changing Lives” for their brevity and clarity.  I want to buy and read every one of them.  (However if you buy them all at one time, there’s no guarantee that the person behind the counter in your local bookstore wouldn’t think you are a weirdo).  Even though this booklet is small the impact of its content is huge.  I used this book as a resource for a counselee dealing with and found the truths within it helpful for him and myself as well and I’m sure it will be too with other readers.

I appreciated the author tackling anger head on especially with his critique of the “substance” model of understanding anger; this is the view that think of anger more as a “thing” inside someone rather than anger being an attitude and act of the person.  As the author argues, how one understands the nature of anger will determine what kind of solution that is being proposed.  As Christians we must come to understand that anger issues reflect someone’s willful desire to sin and not just some impersonal force within us exploding.

The best part of the book is the discussion about being angry with God—very well thought out and life changing material for those struggling with this issue.  The book also gave several questions to help deal with anger with the first set being diagnostic and the second set given with the intent of helping a counselee deal with their sinful anger.  Like with other biblical counseling resources I thoroughly enjoyed the author’s question engaging the readers with biblical truths that confront the lies and false expectation we embrace.

 

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Pre-Engagement Five Questions to Ask Yourselves

This is a great resource for the biblical counselor and those who are involved in a relationship whether engaged or about to be engaged.  Like other booklet in this series, this work doesn’t disappoint; it’s beautiful to see a work that has brevity, communicate simply and biblically while being tremendously helpful.  The author David Powlison is a wonderful biblical counselor who in this work asks a lot of great questions for those who are thinking about marriage.  While the subtitle of the book is “5 questions to Ask Yourselves,” really it’s a booklet of many questions (I lost track of how many), all of which are under five larger and more general questions.  I appreciate the author’s use of questions which makes it an ideal book to warm up discussions between couples and also offer something the Nouthetic counselor to work with.  It’s not just the questions that are good but also some of the practical tidbits the author gives.  For instance, I really appreciated the author’s point of answering the question of whom to look for counsel concerning the relationship and the decision of marriage.  Specifically, after saying that one should invite parental insight he acknowledges that strained parental-child relationship exists but that this should be a great opportunity “to seek to heal the breach,” something that is helpful in tying up loose ends of the past before going into a new marriage with unresolved baggage (26).  I started reading this book as a Pastor looking for good materials to go over with those who we are going over pre-marital counseling with and I not only recommend it, I am going to be using it.

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

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