Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Free Stuff’ Category

 

A Defense of Calvinism Spurgeon

I love how this book begins with Spurgeon making the point that it is important to be grounded with right doctrines and the right Gospel early on as a Christian.  He even have a great illustration of this: “If a tree has to be taken up two or three times a year, you will not need to build a very large loft in which to store the apples.”  With such an opening my interests for this booklet was perked.

Technically this booklet wasn’t necessarily a point by point proof of the five point of Calvinism, often called “TULIP.”  It is really more of a general defense of God’s sovereignty in salvation.  Of course since Spurgeon is a Calvinist this booklet definitely touches on the points of Calvinism even if it isn’t as systematic as other defense of Calvinism might be.  Spurgeon shares his thought on “free will” in light of his own observation of the depravity in his own heart and also the doctrine of Total Depravity.  The bulk of the book makes observation and arguments from Christian understanding of salvation in general and how it makes sense from a high view of God’s Sovereignty.  Spurgeon also deals with the objection that the doctrine of Sovereign Grace leads to an excuse of living a life of habitual sins.  Edifying read.

Chapel Library has this work for free in various electronic format if you click HERE.

If you really want to purchase this for your Kindle Device through Amazon for a cheap cost, click HERE.

Read Full Post »

I don’t know when this offer will end but Jerry Bridges’  “Trusting God: Even When Life Hurts” is available online for Kindle for a limited time!  Down load it now!  You can download it by clicking here.

Read Full Post »

For download onto Kindle.

This offer good from 12:01 AM, April 6th until 11:59 PM, April 7th 2012, Pacific Time.

1.) Crazy Love

Click HERE.

2.) Forgotten God

Click HERE.

3.) Erasing Hell

Click HERE.

[HT]

Read Full Post »

Brian Auten of Apologetics 315, who’s blog features daily apologetics materials from podcasts, resources and definition of philosophical terms, has a limited time offer for the chance to win 3 apologetic books if one takes his survey.

The survey has much to do with whether or not he should go full time ministry with his blog.

If Brian Auten does go full time, it would be a great thing to support him!

TO GO DIRECTLY TO THE BLOG, CLICK HERE

Read Full Post »

In this week’s series on Google Book’s resource for the Christian apologist, I thought it would be appropriate ter’so balance out the apologetics with also the pastoral ministry, since most of the grass level engagement of apologetics occur among those who are in some capacity as Pastors.

Richard Baxter’s “Reformed Pastor” is available online on Google Books for viewing here.  This book can also be downloaded as a PDF file.

Here is my review of the book:

First published in 1656, Richard Baxter’s “The Reformed Pastor” remains a classic even today. The reasons why it is still read is because the truths that Baxter communicates is still relevant today. I will highlight some of these points here.
The book has much to say about the pastor’s duties. Due to the nature of the book, Baxter also addresses regularly the laziness of the minister. I enjoyed how the book tells us the duties of the pastor (and what’s required of that duty) and also cover the motives for fulfilling those duties. This was helpful, as the reason why we do ministry is also just as important as what we do in ministry.
The book is very conscious of the Christian’s duty of sharing the gospel. As an extension of this, Baxter believes the pastor’s duty to share the gospel is even greater: “Every Christian is obliged to do all he can for the salvation of others; but every minister is doubly obliged, because he is separated to the gospel of Christ, and is to give up himself wholly to that work” (196). In fact, the purpose of evangelism serves as a constant motive for Baxter to do the full work of a pastor.
As a result of this evangelistic outlook, Baxter is adamant that a pastor’s responsibility goes beyond just “preaching.” In fact, if Pastors were not obedient to the duty of evangelistic visitations of one’s congregation, Baxter found it unacceptable of one who “tell them of such a glory, and scarcely speak a word to them personally, to them to it…” (207). Throughout the book, Baxter has observed of how private meeting and conversation with one’s congregation has proven to be more fruitful than public preaching alone. This observation is still a true description of the ministry today. The contemporary application is obvious: Pastors are to visit members of the church today, for the purpose of effectively sharing God’s Word and the gospel in private meetings.
In considering the motivation for the work of doing the ministry in terms of sharing the gospel to the lost, Baxter soberly warns us, “Oh what a dreadful thing is it to answer for the neglect of such a charge! And what sin more heinous than that betraying of souls? Doth no that threatening make you tremble…” (199). There is an urgency in Baxter’s writing of the need to do the work of sharing the gospel for the salvation of sinners from the fate of Hell. I found it moving when Baxter wrote, “One would think that the very sight of your miserable neighbours would be motive sufficient to draw out your most compassionate endeavours for their relief” (202-203).
The objections and answer format towards the end of the book was great. It allowed for an organized and easy to follow format for readers to track with the author—something that seems to be typically hard for many puritans writers to accomplish, given their love of having sub-points to the various main-points format in their writing. This portion of the book was refreshing, as much of the objections given against biblical pastoral ministry today was also given back in Baxter’s time.
Furthermore, the book overall was quite helpful in the application of what was taught. These practical principles are useful today and the wise pastor will put them into practice. As a side note, I was delighted to find the book discussing about the importance of exercise, especially in an era before our contemporary fad with health and fitness. Baxter was quite balance, seeing exercise as good for the health. Moreover, there is a spiritual dimension that he pointed out, of how exercising is a form of mortification of sin by practicing Godly discipline.

Read Full Post »

VeritasDomain would like to encourage all believers to be built up in Christ in light of our situation or circumstances in life. Listen to John MacArthur, they are free for download – all of it.

Read Full Post »

http://store.fastcommerce.com/prod_BiolaApologeticsEvents_ff80818118787cbb01187c7faf7440ab.html

Though those who are behind Veritas Domain are presuppositional in our apologetics,  I thought it was worth noting the event at BIOLA on May 27th, 2008 during the Evening.

Those who will be there, let us know how it went!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »