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Archive for the ‘Gospel Coalition’ Category

john-piper

Our series on “Missions, Culture and Being Biblical” have featured some articles written against the Insider Movement and if you need a short summary of the problem in video form here is a short video by John Piper responding to the Insider Movement:

Even thought it was two years ago it is still good and have been shared around on Twitter again this month.  Speaking of twitter, in light of our series you might also want to check out our Twitter @Domainfortruth where we are tweeting and re-tweeting other resources against the Insider Movement.

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I have been looking forward to this book for several weeks now.  The author Kevin DeYoung addresses the important topic of the doctrines of Scripture and he writes in an accessible way that’s friendly toward those who might be new in the faith.  DeYoung will be one of the speakers for next year’s Shepherd’s Conference (2015) that is on the topic of inerrancy and I look forward to what he has to say beyond this book.

There are many books out there on the Bible.  How is this one different?  In the beginning of the book DeYoung makes it clear what this work is not:  It is not a book on personal Bible study, interpretation, apologetics per se or even an academic book with lots of footnotes covering philosophical, theological and methodological issues.  That is, DeYoung explicitly says that this work is neither a systematic or historical theology nor is it an attack piece against some of the recent works from certain quarters of Evangelicals that question the authority of the Bible.  Instead DeYoung’s goal for the book is a lot more modest:  He wants to unpack what the Bible has to say about itself as the Word of God (hence the title).  This is done out of the conviction that the Bible as God’s Word often bring people to faith concerning itself when one allows the Bible to speak.

We do need a simple and direct book that calls this current generation of Christ followers to be faithful to God’s Word and not compromise.  It seems this is what the publishers and author wants to do with this book.  The strength of this book is its straightforward simplicity of truths that are biblical.  Younger Christians need will benefit from reading this and it is perfect for discipleship.  Older seasoned saints can benefit from this book by being reminded of what God’s Word is and its characteristics.  For those who are involved with much academic reading on bibliology, I believe they will find it refreshing as a summary of the doctrines of the Word of God.

There are eight chapters in the book plus an appendix.  All the chapters are expositions of passages that talks about the Word of God.  The bulk of the book covers the characteristics of God’s Word.  I appreciate DeYoung’s intent for application here with even the way he titled the chapters.  For instance, rather than merely say God’s Word is sufficient DeYoung titled chapter three as “God’s Word is Enough.”  Rather than say the authority of Scripture we see chapter five is titled “God’s Word is Final,” etc.  I appreciate the book drawing out implications for the Christian life from a solid bibliology.  My favorite chapter is chapter four’s topic of how God’s Word is clear.  There is so much discussion today about how to interpret the Bible with various new tools that one may start believing one has to graduate with advance degree before we can interpret the Bible for ourselves.  DeYoung notes that this is an issue of one’s view of God, of whether God can reveal Himself or whether He is gagged (to borrow the title of Carson’s book).  This chapter is a great encouragement for believers to know that God’s Word is “knowable” contrary to the problematic claims of some critic.

I also appreciated the appendix as well with its list of thirty significant books on the Bible.  DeYoung even labeled each work as either beginner, intermediate and advanced.  I do disagree with DeYoung calling John Frame’s Doctrine of the Word of God as “beginner.”

I give this book a four out of five since I wished he could have interacted with some of the recent critics more nevertheless I recommend it for believers as a good summary.

Go here for 35% discount.

Or you can also order this book on Amazon

NOTE: This book was provided to me free by Crossway and Net Galley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.

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The Scriptures Testify About Me

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

This book is based upon the national conference for the Gospel Coalition in 2011 in which the topic was on how to preach Jesus and the Gospel from the Old Testament. I purchased this book because of the name D.A. Carson, who was the editor; I also wanted to see how other preachers expound on Jesus from the Old Testament. The quality of each chapter was mixed—depending upon the contributor. The two chapters that stood out were the first and the last one. Al Mohler begins the book by laying the foundation concerning studying the Scriptures and finding Jesus. Mohler’s chapter was basically an exposition of John 5:31-47. D.A. Carson wrote the last chapter on Melchizedek in Psalm 110 and he did a superb job of illuminating our understanding of Jesus fulfilling in Psalm 110 in light of antecedent theology and later revelation in the book of Hebrews. I thought Carson’s contribution was a good example of an exposition on the Old Testament pointing towards Jesus with careful biblical theology. It is an example for other pastors and teachers to emulate. Personally, the weakest chapter in the book was by James MacDonald. MacDonald’s treatment on Psalm 25 seems to me to be more of a running commentary; even then I felt I learned more about MacDonald but not necessarily of how Psalm 25 bears witness to Jesus. Some of the chapters I think some of the preachers could have done a better job connecting the dot to Jesus. I was expecting the book to have more emphasis on the Messianic prophecies in the Old Testament pointing towards Jesus. Overall an edifying read.

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This Elephant room thing is getting a little bit out of control by the minute.

So the issue that people have concerning T.D. Jakes on the show and embracing him as a brother is his heretical theology: (1) His view of the Trinity and (2) his word of faith prosperity gospel.

So how does the Elephant Room responds to this?

Character assassination…and attacking African American Christians who speaks out against TD Jakes.

Talk about a red herring from the issue about the centrality of the Gospel.

You have to watch this clip, it’s unbelievable:

I can’t believe it has to get this low, to pull the race card, and a big red herring from the main point.  The issue is the theological content that T.D. Jakes subscribe to!

But can’t one also turn this psycho-assertions against the very ones saying it? If you watch this clip, the “White Elephant” (pun intended) that’s in the room is the host, James MacDonald.  These guys are invited on the show to talk about African American Reformed preachers who speak out against T.D. Jakes.  It seems as if these guys are trying to gain access into the Elephant in the Room Volume 2, a world that is dominated by the host who is an older white guy.  It seems that the guy is here pontificating his opinion against some other Black preachers to gain more leverage into the crowd who watches the Elephant Room.

 

 

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This is a message by the New Testament scholar D.A. Carson:

It was from the Gospel Coalition LA Regional Conference earlier last year on November 6, 2010.

[HT]

 

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