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Archive for the ‘Graphic novel’ Category

A weekend leisure reading review…because sometimes Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading!

 

Tom King.  Batman, Volume 9: The Tyrant Wing. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, March 26th 2019. 152 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Ready for another adventure with Batman?  This title collects Batman comic issue 58 through 60 and also Batman Annual 3 and Batman Secret files 1. While the cover says this is written by Tom King in actually he was the writer for issues 58 to 60 and the rest was written by various other writers.

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A lighthearted weekend reading review…because sometimes Pastors need a break from heavy reading also.

Jason Henderson and Tony Salvaggio.  Clockwerx.  Los Angeles, CA: Humanoids, September 21, 2016.  112 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This was a fun graphic novel (comics) to read.  The story takes place at London in 1899.  For those who enjoy “steampunk” theme graphic novel this is one that readers will enjoy.  As one would expect from a steampunk genre Clockwex mixes the nineteenth century time period with technology that’s ahead of its time and yet it does this without feeling like a sci-fi.

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A lighthearted weekend reading review…because sometimes Pastors need a break from heavy reading also.

 

Chris Robersons.  Masks.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, September 10th 2013.  200 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon KindleAmazon Paperback

If you love super heroes from the pulp era of the 1930-50s you would love this work!  In this comic book we see nine different pulp superheroes such as the Green Hornet with his sidekick Kato, Zorro, the Black Bat and the Shadow joining forces in one story to fight against a political enemy known as the Justice Party.  And what a treat it was to read this graphic novel and see these characters coming together and fighting against evil!

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We continue with our blog’s “wee-kids Wednesdays” and this week’s review of children’s books aren’t Christian works but they are still something homeschool kids and parents would appreciate!

Geronimo Stilton.  Geronimo Stilton Reporter #2: It’s MY Scoop!. New York, NY: Papercutz, June 4th 2019. 56 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Having read a few Geronimo Stilton’s graphic novels to my kids the last few weeks from the publisher Papercutz I was pleasantly surprised to learn they now have a new series on Geronimo Stilton titled “Geronimo Stilton Reporter Graphic Novels Series 2 primary works.”  It is different than the other series in that while the other series was more historical with time travel this present series focuses on the present or the contemporary time period of Geronimo’s own life time.  As I read this story to my daughters they enjoyed it and laughed throughout Geronimo’s adventure.

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Here are weekend reviews of comic book readings, because sometimes Pastors needs a break from heavy theological reading!

The following are comics that are historical fictions, nonfictions or comics that takes place of a certain specific historical era.

Ethan Young. Nanjing: The Burning City.  Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics, September 1st 2015. 216 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This graphic novel is a historical fiction and tells the story of those Chinese abandoned by their government during the Japanese war against China in 1937.  The story takes place in the former capital of the Republic in Nanjing.  While this is an historical fiction the theme and characters could have easily been real life ordinary soldiers and people trying to survive.  The author and illustrator Ethan Young is to be commended for his illustration, his storytelling ability and also his focus on an era that is very hard to think about and which some today downplay or are ignorant of concerning the Japanese atrocities during World War Two.  This graphic novel was so good that it won the 2016 Reuben Award for Best Graphic Novel.

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I’m going to have a part 2 of reviews of comic books and graphic novels that are historical fiction in its genre that I read this year, 2017 since I take a long time to write up all the reviews as oppose to just reading them.  For now here are the following reviews as part of this weekend’s light reading weekend reviews…because Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading.

Brian Wood. Rebels: A Well-Regulated Militia.  Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics, May 4th 2016. 262 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This volume collects a series of graphic novel stories about the American War of Independence.  The idea of a comic series on the War of Independence fascinates me as someone who loves to read history; and the beautiful artwork for the cover sealed it for me that this worth picking up.  While one shouldn’t judge a book by its cover nevertheless in this instance the artwork with the cover was a tastes of things to come.

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A lighthearted reading review…because sometimes a Pastors need a break from heavy reading also.

Matt Wagner.  The Shadow: Year One.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, April 28th 2015.  304 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is a longer story of the pulp comic book hero known as “The Shadow.”  Not that I’m complaining about it being longer but rather I see it as a delight since this past year I have been immensely enjoying the stories and the character of “The Shadow.”  If you enjoy other titles on the Shadow you will enjoy this one.

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A weekend leisure reading book review.  Because even Pastors need a break from heavy theological reading.

Howard Chaykin.  The Shadow: Midnight in Moscow.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, July, 2015.  160 pp.

3 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is another graphic novel of the pulp hero name the Shadow.  Most of the stories of the Shadow takes place in the 1930s but this particular volume takes place on the end of the year of 1949 and the beginning of 1950.  There are multiple references throughout the graphic novel that the Shadow has been fighting crime and evil men for over two decades and a major subplot is how long the Shadow would keep going with his fight against evil since there is no end in sight with the amount of evil men who would arise as villains and also because the Shadow’s longtime partner against crime and lover Margo Lane wishes to settle down.  Yet even when the two are on vacation trouble still follows them and the need for the Shadow calls.

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A light reading weekend book review!  Why?  Because Pastors need breaks and fun read too.

Garth Ennis.  The Shadow, Volume 4: Bitter Fruit.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, October 28th, 2012.  180 pp.

3 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

If you like graphic novels with a pulp, noir and historical feel of the 1920s-50s you ought to give the character “The Shadow” a try.  This is my third volume I read that featured the Shadow because I have come to really this character.  Here’s my thought on this specific volume.

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I haven’t posted a light leisure reading for the weekend for a few weeks now.  Sometimes Pastors also need to take a mental break…

green-arrow-year-one

Andy Diggle.  Green Arrow: Year One. New York, NY: DC Comics, April 22nd, 2008. 160 pp.

This was for a fun read.  I did enjoyed it.  This is another character that I don’t know anything about and it explains the origin of the DC hero Green Arrow and his beginnings.  The story tells us of a rich and spoiled young man name Oliver Queen who suddenly found a purpose in life in fighting for justice.  What began as a trip on a yacht with an ex-Royal Marine mentor on all things “manly” becomes horrific as he is conned and left for dead.  But Oliver survives alone in an island where he soon found out that it is run by an evil enterprise where the natives are enslaved.  This fight for justice for the native would launch him into a career of being a hero for justice.  Overall I enjoyed this story and the character’s transition from a celebrity spoiled brat as seen in how he ruined a charity auction become a man with a deep sense of justice.

Purchase: Amazon

 

If you are interested in comics here’s a link to my Collection of Posts: Superheroes, Comics and Worldview Series.

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The last few weeks has been heavy for me in the ministry front.  Here’s a light reading review for the weekend.

The Odyssey of Sergeant Jack Brennan

Bryan Doerries.  The Odyssey of Sergeant Jack Brennan.  New York, NY: Pantheon Books, April 5th, 2016.  160 pp.

This graphic novel is a retelling of the Greek classic The Odyssey but with a modern twist.  The author is a big advocate of using classical literature as a tool help military service members cope and heal with the aftermath of war.  Bryan Doerries founded a project called Theater of War that presents readings of Greek plays to service members and veterans.  The book itself takes that same concept but uses the medium of graphic novel.  It tells the story of an infantry squad of Marines heading home from Afghanistan and their sergeant Jack Brennan telling the story of the Odyssey to help his junior Marines transition back home from war.  A few pages into the book I was already thinking, “Man, this might be good for some fellow veterans I know…”

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Yesterday I posted on “Spurgeon on Preachers Reading Outside the Bible and Theology.”  One commentator, patrickhawthorne01, wrote “Does this mean I still get to read the comics?”  So its probably appropriate to have my weekly Friday evening book reviews of leisure reading to be on comics!

Superman for All Seasons

Jeph Loeb. Superman for All Seasons. New York, NY: DC Comics, September 25th 2002. 206 pp.

5 out of 5

Funny as this may sound this is my first Superman comic that I read.  That’s largely due to the fact that as a kid I found Superman to be cheesy.  So when I give this book a rating of 5 out of 5 I hope readers would understand that I really thought this book was good.  It surpassed my expectations!  When the writer Jeph Loeb and the artist Tim Sale team up they are incredible and this is another example of great comic art and story just like their other work: Batman: The Long Halloween and Daredevil Legends, Vol. 1: Yellow.

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Here’s tonight’s recommended light reading.  Because ministers sometimes need a break from theology.

Daredevil Yellow Loeb

Jeph Loeb. Daredevil: Yellow.  New York, NY: Marvel Publishing Incorporated, December 17th, 2008. 168 pp.

This is my first time reading about the superhero known as Daredevil and I enjoyed it.  What prompted me to read this work is because of the name of the writer and the artist whom I enjoyed seeing their previous works on Batman.  I really like the storytelling ability of author Jeph Loeb and also the artistic presentation of Tim Sale whose drawing and colors are believable compared to some comics about superheroes while he also masterfully gives us colors and facial expression of character that is complex and beautifully gives us an overall noir-like vibe.

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The Jekyll Island Chronicles Book One A Machine Age War

Steve Nedvidek and Ed Crowell. The Jekyll Island Chronicles, Book One: A Machine Age War.  Marietta, GA: Top Shelf Productions, May 31st, 2016. 176 pp.

This was a fun graphic novel.  I was looking for something like this for some time now and I’m glad I found it!  This is a historical fiction that has a bit of steampunk feel though it is centered in the 1910s-1920s than British Victorian Era.  The story line exceeded my expectations.  This work tells us a story of the post-World War One period in which US president Woodrow Wilson was trying to sell the League of the Nations both abroad and at home.  However this is not about the League of the Nations but an alternative history of how a secret conspiracy group is going about perpetuating terrorism and a president who is worried about the future.  Eventually at a place called Jekyll Island in the state of Georgia a gathering of the leading men of the time would be united to fight this threat by raising a team of superheroes.

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The Ukrainian and Russian Notebooks

Igort. The Ukrainian and Russian Notebooks.  New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, April 26th, 2016. 352 pp.

This is really two books in one.  I had a rough start with this work but it got better as I continued reading.  The book is presented as a journal in the format of a graphic novel.  I think the editor is right to say this work will go down in history with other graphic journalists work.  In this review I will look at book one, “The Ukrainian Notebooks” and part two, “The Russian Notebooks” respectively.

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