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Archive for the ‘Graphic novel’ Category

Here are weekend reviews of comic book readings, because sometimes Pastors needs a break from heavy theological reading!

The following are comics that are historical fictions, nonfictions or comics that takes place of a certain specific historical era.

Ethan Young. Nanjing: The Burning City.  Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics, September 1st 2015. 216 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This graphic novel is a historical fiction and tells the story of those Chinese abandoned by their government during the Japanese war against China in 1937.  The story takes place in the former capital of the Republic in Nanjing.  While this is an historical fiction the theme and characters could have easily been real life ordinary soldiers and people trying to survive.  The author and illustrator Ethan Young is to be commended for his illustration, his storytelling ability and also his focus on an era that is very hard to think about and which some today downplay or are ignorant of concerning the Japanese atrocities during World War Two.  This graphic novel was so good that it won the 2016 Reuben Award for Best Graphic Novel.

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I’m going to have a part 2 of reviews of comic books and graphic novels that are historical fiction in its genre that I read this year, 2017 since I take a long time to write up all the reviews as oppose to just reading them.  For now here are the following reviews as part of this weekend’s light reading weekend reviews…because Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading.

Brian Wood. Rebels: A Well-Regulated Militia.  Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics, May 4th 2016. 262 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This volume collects a series of graphic novel stories about the American War of Independence.  The idea of a comic series on the War of Independence fascinates me as someone who loves to read history; and the beautiful artwork for the cover sealed it for me that this worth picking up.  While one shouldn’t judge a book by its cover nevertheless in this instance the artwork with the cover was a tastes of things to come.

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A lighthearted reading review…because sometimes a Pastors need a break from heavy reading also.

Matt Wagner.  The Shadow: Year One.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, April 28th 2015.  304 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is a longer story of the pulp comic book hero known as “The Shadow.”  Not that I’m complaining about it being longer but rather I see it as a delight since this past year I have been immensely enjoying the stories and the character of “The Shadow.”  If you enjoy other titles on the Shadow you will enjoy this one.

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A weekend leisure reading book review.  Because even Pastors need a break from heavy theological reading.

Howard Chaykin.  The Shadow: Midnight in Moscow.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, July, 2015.  160 pp.

3 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is another graphic novel of the pulp hero name the Shadow.  Most of the stories of the Shadow takes place in the 1930s but this particular volume takes place on the end of the year of 1949 and the beginning of 1950.  There are multiple references throughout the graphic novel that the Shadow has been fighting crime and evil men for over two decades and a major subplot is how long the Shadow would keep going with his fight against evil since there is no end in sight with the amount of evil men who would arise as villains and also because the Shadow’s longtime partner against crime and lover Margo Lane wishes to settle down.  Yet even when the two are on vacation trouble still follows them and the need for the Shadow calls.

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A light reading weekend book review!  Why?  Because Pastors need breaks and fun read too.

Garth Ennis.  The Shadow, Volume 4: Bitter Fruit.  Runnemede, NJ: Dynamite Entertainment, October 28th, 2012.  180 pp.

3 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

If you like graphic novels with a pulp, noir and historical feel of the 1920s-50s you ought to give the character “The Shadow” a try.  This is my third volume I read that featured the Shadow because I have come to really this character.  Here’s my thought on this specific volume.

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I haven’t posted a light leisure reading for the weekend for a few weeks now.  Sometimes Pastors also need to take a mental break…

green-arrow-year-one

Andy Diggle.  Green Arrow: Year One. New York, NY: DC Comics, April 22nd, 2008. 160 pp.

This was for a fun read.  I did enjoyed it.  This is another character that I don’t know anything about and it explains the origin of the DC hero Green Arrow and his beginnings.  The story tells us of a rich and spoiled young man name Oliver Queen who suddenly found a purpose in life in fighting for justice.  What began as a trip on a yacht with an ex-Royal Marine mentor on all things “manly” becomes horrific as he is conned and left for dead.  But Oliver survives alone in an island where he soon found out that it is run by an evil enterprise where the natives are enslaved.  This fight for justice for the native would launch him into a career of being a hero for justice.  Overall I enjoyed this story and the character’s transition from a celebrity spoiled brat as seen in how he ruined a charity auction become a man with a deep sense of justice.

Purchase: Amazon

 

If you are interested in comics here’s a link to my Collection of Posts: Superheroes, Comics and Worldview Series.

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The last few weeks has been heavy for me in the ministry front.  Here’s a light reading review for the weekend.

The Odyssey of Sergeant Jack Brennan

Bryan Doerries.  The Odyssey of Sergeant Jack Brennan.  New York, NY: Pantheon Books, April 5th, 2016.  160 pp.

This graphic novel is a retelling of the Greek classic The Odyssey but with a modern twist.  The author is a big advocate of using classical literature as a tool help military service members cope and heal with the aftermath of war.  Bryan Doerries founded a project called Theater of War that presents readings of Greek plays to service members and veterans.  The book itself takes that same concept but uses the medium of graphic novel.  It tells the story of an infantry squad of Marines heading home from Afghanistan and their sergeant Jack Brennan telling the story of the Odyssey to help his junior Marines transition back home from war.  A few pages into the book I was already thinking, “Man, this might be good for some fellow veterans I know…”

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