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Archive for the ‘Army’ Category

Why am I reviewing this?  Because even Pastors need a break from heavy theology.

Pale Horse Hunting Terrorists and Commanding Heroes with the 101st Airborne Division

Jimmy Blackmon.  Pale Horse: Hunting Terrorists and Commanding Heroes with the 101st Airborne Division.  New York, NY: Saint Martin’s Press, March 8th, 2016. 368 pp.

I’ve appreciated those involve with the US Army combat aviation after reading this book in ways that I never did before.  There doesn’t seem to be that many books on combat helicopter pilots so I imagine this book would have staying power as books recommend for military officers’ professional reading.  If this book isn’t in any professional reading list yet I think it should be soon as recommended reading at some level of the military.

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No True Glory A Frontline Account of the Battle for Fallujah by Bing West

Bing West. No True Glory: A Frontline Account of the Battle for Fallujah.  New York, NY: Bantam Book, December 7th, 2011. 378 pp.

This book is about the US military’s operation in Fallujah from the time the first troops were on the ground in that city and leading up to the Marines’ assault towards the end of 2004.  There is so much that people don’t understand about the US military’s approach towards Fallujah and so many mistaken assumptions and factually incorrect claims of what the US military did.  I think this book makes an important contribution towards understanding what happened.

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As usual each Friday I try to post a review of weekend readings that pastors and others can read that serves as break from their spiritual readings.  Tonight’s book was one that was a great exercise of other parts of my mind.

The Insurgents David Petraeus by Fred Kaplan

Fred Kaplan. The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War.  New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, January 2nd, 2013. 432 pp.

What an amazing book.  I have so many good things to say.  But first a brief summary:  The author Fred Kaplan takes a look at the US Army’s wrestling with the idea and practice of counterinsurgency after the post-Vietnam era.  Kaplan makes the point that after the Vietnam War the leadership at the Pentagon never wanted to fight another counterinsurgency again.  Instead the military as a whole focused on the more traditional concept of warfare such as big tank battles, heavy artillery and mechanized heavy infantry.  A lot of this was due to the ongoing Cold War with the threat of Russia and the Eastern Bloc.  It was also what was most familiar to many of the Generals and Admirals.  But the collapse of the Soviet Union and the defeat of the fourth largest tank army during Desert Storm soon reduced the likelihood of the traditional warfare that the US wanted.  Unfortunately after Vietnam the Army has stopped thinking, teaching and training for counter-insurgency.  It didn’t even have a manual for that kind of warfare among its publications!  This book focuses primarily on how this mentality hurt the US military and also on the men and women who tried to change the Army’s way of fighting war.  It concentrate largely on the war in Iraq though it does give a brief look at Afghanistan.  Having recently read a number of books on military history I must say this book was one of the best military history nonfiction I read in the first half of 2016.

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I am reviewing this book late at night in the last few hours on Memorial Day. Back in the Fight The Explosive Memoir of a Special Operator Who Never Gave Up

Joseph Kapacziewski.  Back in the Fight: The Explosive Memoir of a Special Operator Who Never Gave Up.  New York, NY: St. Martin Press, May 7th, 2013. 304 pp.

This is quite the autobiography of the only Army Ranger serving in direct combat operations with a prosthetic limb.  The Army Rangers are a part of the United States Special Operation Forces which makes it no easy task for someone recovering from massive combat injuries and missing a leg.  Sergeant First Class Kapacziewski tells this story because in his own words he wants to reach and encourage other wounded soldiers to continue forward and not give up.  I think his story is worth reading even for those who were not injured—and even those that didn’t serve.

The first thing that struck me reading this book is the fact that this guy is my age.  We both graduated the same year.  We both joined the military around the same time.  Both of us found early in our military career to be the point which we can point to and see we have grown up and became a man.  But that’s probably where any similarities end since Kapacziewski is a much tougher man than I’ll ever be.  I appreciated reading his story because here is a story about my military generation.  The one who woke up one morning and saw 9/11 on TV and knew we have to do something about it.  Kapacziewski represent the young Americans that goes against the grain of what people often associate with Millennials as being self-centered and self-absorbed: He has had more than his fair share of combat with ten combat deployments under his belt of which five deployments was after he has loss his leg from an enemy grenade.  The guy was probably not even thirty years old when he started writing this book.

I appreciated the book having his wife share her side of the story as well.  Especially the part after Kapacziewski was wounded in which she as an Army wife took care of him in the hospital.  This was probably the hardest portion of the book—she’s a hero in my book in a day and age where talks of marriage commitment is cheap and the many no-fault divorces that proves it.  It takes a special woman to be a wife of a service member—who live by the creed of “in sickness and in health.”

I learned a few things about the Army Rangers as well.  I’ll be honest, I’m an ignorant Marine.  Before this book I thought Ranger School was the same thing as the Ranger Indoc Program.  I didn’t know that there were so few Rangers even though I knew beforehand that there are only three Battalions of them.  I didn’t know the Rangers deploy typically for three months and it makes sense their shorter deployments with all the dangers they face in their late night raids of high value targets.  I’ve appreciated Rangers before and now I appreciate them so much more after the book.

I’m glad that there are warriors like Kapacziewski who stand against those who are evil and radical terrorists in Iraq and Afghanistan.  For Kapacziewski it is not about himself and his injuries but about being with something higher than himself and specifically the Rangers.  I think the fact speaks for itself in that the author spent over half of the book discussing about the Rangers and his fellow soldiers before ever getting to the terrible combat injury that made him lost his foot.  He spend more time talking about his pre-injury deployment in the book than he did his painful road of recovery.

What’s in it for the Christian?

As I am reviewing this book for a Christian blog one might ask what in it for the Christian to read this book.  First off, this book will remind you that there are really such thing as evil men who wants to murder innocent people.  Christians must never sugarcoat our view of reality and be reminded that wickedness is real.  Secondly, Romans 13 talks about honoring those who are in Government.  This is one way you can have a greater appreciation for some of the sacrifices elite Special Operators will endure to serve the country.  Thirdly, there are passages in the New Testament that call Christians to serve God faithfully like soldiers.  A book like this will give a glimpse of what that kind of radical commitment of soldiering looks like.

I recommend the book for all adults.

Purchase: Amazon

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The Gamble General David Petraeus

Purchase: Amazon

Thomas Ricks has written another wonderful book on the military and the importance of having the right generals during war.  In this book he looks at the Surge of the Iraq war and the military leadership involved with the great “gamble” of achieving some kind of nominal success in winding down the war.  Most Americans have little understanding about the Surge and those who are better informed often know about the Surge in the context of the heated partisan debate in 2006-07 between Republicans and Democrats sitting on Capitol Hill.  Indeed few understood the strategy and operational perspective of the leaders “on the ground” and I think that include many politicians.  It does not help that very little has been written about the military leadership that led the actual Surge since few journalists in my opinion are capable of understanding or appreciating the operational side of the military.  I think Ricks is an exception to the rule and his writing as a journalist over the years has matured and display a great understanding and appreciation of military strategy and the importance of the right personnel at the level of General officers.  For some he is a must read as a great introduction for military intellectuals.

In order to appreciate the surge one must first understand the military’s involvement in Iraq prior to the surge.  Ricks in the book is blunt in his discussion of the early years of the Iraq war with its bad leadership, blunders and shortsightedness among those in the officer corps.  He argues that bad leadership will result in ugly outcomes like that of Haditha and similar episodes.  I know the incident in Haditha is rather contentious but he does make a point that how the Battalion commander and upper echelon commanders handled the incident show a lack of understanding of the basic premise of counter-insurgency is to win the people rather than further alienate them from the military’s objective.  Ricks sees Haditha as a sort of turning point.  The early years of Iraq was a difficult time as many Battalion, Regimental, Brigade and even Division Commanders didn’t understand just what kind of war they were waging.  Ricks pointed out that the ones that did understood were actually the outsiders such as General Petraeus.  General Petraeus was different than most of his peers in many ways: unlike most of the Army’s leadership in the early years of Iraq his career was spent mostly among light infantry rather than the heavy infantry (think Mechanized infantry).  There is an unspoken code that officers are to separate themselves from political connection but Petraeus was comfortable with courting political support and in fact desired that.  Petraeus was also highly educated and open to discussion among civilians for their expertise.  This play a crucial role in his formulation of his doctrines on Counter-insurgency as General Petraeus is the one who led the re-writing of the modern Army’s Counter-insurgency manual.  I have heard in the past that Petraeus wrote the manual with the legendary Marine Corps General Mattis but what I didn’t know before and learned in the book is how many people and how diverse was the make up of the group that help consulted and wrote the Counter-Insurgency manual.  Petraeus had all kinds of experts ranging from the expected military officers to human rights lawyers and civilian historians of the military.  What I appreciated in the book is how the author pointed out that for General Petraeus, the metric for measuring success in his strategy is not merely winning territory but winning the people instead.  He saw the people not as “collaterals” in the way of a military objective but instead the people was the objective and the prize.

The war being conducted badly was what eventually drove politicians to re-evaulate how the war was being conducted—and it was also what led George Bush to finally be open for new and fresh military leadership.  I appreciate the author describing the relationship of the old leadership versus the new leadership that was going to lead the surge.  In particular I was delighted to read about the relationship between General Petraeus and Odierno who were both very different in temperament and approach but both worked together well.  Previously I had thought of Odierno as the General who merely was famous for helping the US pack up after major military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and I had no idea how much of a role Odierno  played in the surge.  I’m glad I read this book!  Odierno was the one who was the “hammer” while Petraeus was the soft spoken leader so to speak.  Together they worked out a balance in approaching the insurgency.

There are far too many things I learned from the book and one should get a copy for oneself!  At the time that I read this book towards the end of 2014, I realize that this book was published in 2009 and the book was limited in its coverage of Iraq between 2006-2008.  Obviously one can’t help but to think of the future of Iraq.  The author was realistic in my opinion and was no mere cheerleader for the Surge—he also caution that the objective of the Surge might fail if politicians don’t allow troops’ presence to continue longer and the author also saw that Iraqi politicians has the ball in their court to build partnership that stretches beyond partisanship in particular with the Sunni-Shiite-Kurds divide.  How true that is in hindsight as 2014 has turned out to be the year of ISIS’ expansion.  I think we must not forget that Iraq has now been more or less divided into three powers, the very thing that America wanted to avoid with Iraq’s future.  I read this book with much nostalgia thinking about my own time in the military and deployment in Iraq.  Like the author, I have many mix feelings, saw the Surge as a success but one with many limitation as to how far it will go if its not followed up on the political end both in Iraq and the United States.  One thing that the author didn’t see coming that I can’t help thinking about as I read the book was how much of a role the current conflict in Iraq with ISIS owe its ability and strength from the “Sons of the Awakening” that the US military employed back in 2006 and onwards.  Many of these were Sunni militants who switched sides who sought employment with the US as militias against Al Qaeda.  Since the Iraqi government with its Shiite majority would have never supported this make shift army and didn’t want to incorporate them into the regular Army, what would have happened to these military aged men who were trained, armed and unemployed?  It doesn’t require rocket science to connect the thought that these men would obviously be a source for ISIS to tap into once the Americans’ departure left a vacuum.  I have come to a stronger opinion that the United States should really think long and hard before we train any militant groups as we can never predict what it will mean for us and the region five, ten and twenty years down the line.  If history tells us anything, we often train and equipped our future enemies.

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Note: For the next few weeks on Sunday we will feature a review of books outside of theology, philosophy and apologetics.  Each review of a non-Christian book will also have a section titled, “What’s in it for the Christian?” The Generals American Military Command from World War II to TodayPurchase: Amazon

This book is a wonderful study on generalship in the United States Army from World War two to the present with Iraq and Afghanistan.  The author has written in the past about the military before, most notably about the Marine Corps boot camp.  I was pleasantly surprised at how much the author Thomas Ricks has grown in his understanding of the military since his first book on the military in 1997.

The thesis that the author argues for in the book is that the Marshall concept of Generalship worked in World War Two.  To be more specific, the concept is on how the Army manages General, and how under the old Marshall system it was expected that generals would be relieved and fire in order for the system to work and battles to be won.  Under the Marshall system, relief from command wasn’t necessarily the end of one’s military career like how it is understood today; generals were moved to other command since sometimes those who were not effective in combat command but were better leaders in other area of the Army (logistics, training, etc).  The Marshall’s way of managing generals was very effective but since World War two the book argues that the US Army has deviated from this concept.  Today generals are never relieved by the military itself (though there are political removals such as the infamous case of Douglas MacArthur by President Truman).  The book argues that as a result of the neglect of the Marshall system this has led to a crop of many poor generals who negatively affected the outcome of operations, battles and entire wars, not to mention the waste of lives and money.  What’s worst is that there are often no repercussions for generals who failed; in the modern military a private who lost his rifle will face more punishment than a general who lost a war.

Students of military history would love the author’s discussion about how General Eisenhower balanced the various charismatic generals during World War two such as General Patton, British General Montgomery and General Bradley.  The book also surveyed the Generals in the Korean War as the first war that failed to implement the Marshall system and how various Generals blundered but were not relieved.  This would continue on into the Vietnam War where it was even more pronounced with General Westmoreland and other lesser known generals.  The book also surveyed the more recent Iraq War and I agree with the author that the beginning of Iraq the military had some pretty bad generals (personally, General Sanchez comes to mind).  The book even covered the Iraq War right up to the surge (the author focuses on the surge in two other books after this volume) with General David Petraeus and notes how long it took before the right generals were in place leading the war effort was also the same duration that the US military took to win World War two in the Marshall system.

While it was not the main focus of the book, I did appreciate the author’s contrast between the Army’s handling of general officers versus that of the Navy and the Marines.  The Navy holds their officers to higher accountability and how they regularly relieve officers for ships that hit ground and get stuck.  Unfortunately, the author said that the sample size for the Marine Corps was too small, but Ricks does note how the Marine generals led their Division out of Chosin Reservoir as a combat effective unit while an adjacent Army unit with poor leadership ended up being hammered.  Ricks also talked about how during the Iraq War the Marine General Mattis who commanded the first Marine Division relieved a regimental commander of the first Marines for going to slow during the invasion and that this became international news.  However, during world war two such an event was frequent occurrence and not even worthy of being international news since it was assume the goal of victory was more important than allowing commanders to save face.

This is an excellent book for civilians and military like.  I think those in military should read this book, whether officers or enlisted so one can get the bigger picture.  In summary, the book presents a strong case to modify the maxim that “Amateurs study strategies, professionals study logistics;” we may add, “The Army leadership must study management of personnel.”

What’s in it for the Christian: A big theme in the book is accountability.  Christians have stressed the importance of accountability, given our fallen nature.  Accountability is something that is needed even outside of the military—and especially in the ministry, which is concerned with matters of eternity.  The author notes how different officers have different abilities, and just because one might not be able to lead in combat command that does not mean they are not useful for the military elsewhere.  Christians who are familiar with the Bible’s teaching of spiritual gifts—that we all have different gifts though it is different from each person to person.  As a Christian, this book was also insightful concerning human nature and the art of balancing different personalities in a group or a church that one leads—it has challenged me to appreciate how being a team player is a virtue.

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Taking a break this Veteran’s Day friday evening from our regularly scheduled apologetics and theology blogging to remember those who served.  This is a 1951 movie that I recently found online and I was surprised that a movie like this was made in the early 50s and that it was made that close after the war.  If you don’t know anything about the Japanese American infantry unit known as the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, you ought to do a little online reading this weekend which would be more than appropriate for Veteran’s Day.  They are still today the most decorated Army unit on the record, with the highest casualty rate sustained by any unit.  And they were serving in a time when Japanese American loyalty were being questioned and their family held in internment camps back in the States which makes the amount of sacrifice shown by these brave men even more phenomenal.  I kind of wish a 21st century movie of this unit would have been made today of the quality of Band of Brothers and Saving Private Ryan.  I think it would sell.

I was struck with how the movie capture so much reality rather than being another sugar coat war propaganda movie: they did a good job showing the reality of racism, conveying GI culture, referencing specific things that’s Japanese American and made honest allusion to the reality of the internment camp experience.  That was probably the more surprising part of the movie, to see that being acknowledged back in the 50s!  The US government would acknowledge this sad chapter in American history in the 1980s (but that’s another subject, another post and another time!).  On the lighter side of things, I found it funny the movie’s reference to one of the guys being a graduate of USC (I’m a UCLA Bruin) and the small size of Asian infantryman.  As an American Marine of Asian descent, the last part struck a chord with me.  More than one time throughout the movie I was surprised at how it did not caricature Japanese American compared to other movies showing Asian during this time period.  I highly commend this movie in able to capture of slice of reality, conveying bravery and folly, sadness and humor, irony and patriotism with even a consciousness of civilians caught in the mix of war.  Well done film for it’s time.

Enjoy!  I just hope I didn’t hype it too much.

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