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Archive for the ‘Navy Seals’ Category

A weekend reading review…because sometimes Pastors need a break from heavy reading also.

Brandon Webb.  Mastering Fear: A Navy SEAL’s Guide. New York, NY: Penguin Group, August 7th 2018. 221 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

How do you handle fear?  If you want to learn about handling fear from someone who has had a career of dealing with risky situations and fear then this book would be for you.  The author of this book is Brandon Webb.  Webb is a former Navy SEAL.  He’s not only a Navy SEAL, a combat veteran (one tour in Iraq, one tour in Afghanistan) but also a sniper instructor for the SEALs who have trained famous SEAL warriors such as Chris Kyle (the top American sniper in history) and Marcus Luttrell, the lone survivor of Operation Redwing in 2005.  From his experience and also his reflection he’s written this book about handling fear.

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In light of Memorial Day.

Jocko Willink.  Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win.  New York, NY: Saint Martin’s Press, October 20th 2015. 320 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

How well do you own up to your own fault and flaws?  Do you often blame other people and your circumstance when you should be admitting your own fault?  This was a good book on leadership by a combat leader in the Navy SEALS.  It wasn’t only just a good book on leadership; it was also a good book of how to be under leaders as well.  The title of the book captures the subject of the material well; it is a book on taking personal responsibility of what you do.  Taking responsibility is a big important mark of a good leader versus a bad leader.

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I know for many summer vacation is around the corner so here’s my review of two military books for your summer travel…and also because Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading!

For other suggestions check out also our previous post “2017 Memorial Day Weekend Lists of Recommended Readings.”

Robert O’Neill.  The Operator: Firing the Shots that Killed Osama bin Laden and My Years as a SEAL Team Warrior. New York, NY: Scribner, April 3rd 2018. 368 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is a book by the Navy SEAL who shot Osama Bin Laden.  This book not only tell the story of the mission to go after Bin Laden but also Robert O’Neill’s upbringing in Montana, how he joined the Navy and made it into the SEALs.  A fascinating book of a fascinating individual.

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This CBS’ 60 Minutes Documentary on the Navy SEALs rescue of Jessica Buchanan was quite emotional at the end of the video when they had her share in her own words.  It shows the incredible sacrifice of some of our elite warriors in the Special Operations Community going all out to rescue a hostage even to the risk of their own life.

Of course I can’t watch something like this without being very moved emotionally.  I try to imagine what its like to be in her shoe, to be alive when one might have counted one’s life dead.

I can imagine a bit of the gratitude she must have for these warriors.  It’s no surprised that when I went on Youtube I also found that she recently spoke of her experience in support of the Navy SEAL foundation.

That got me thinking tangent to another rescue operation.

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In light of the upcoming fifth year anniversary of the Bin Laden raid, I review this book for this weekend’s reading recommendation.

SEAL Target Geronimo

Chuck Pfarrer. SEAL Target Geronimo: The Inside Story of the Mission to Kill Osama bin Laden.  New York, NY: Saint Martin’s Press, November 8th, 2011. 240 pp.

At first I wasn’t sure of whether or not I should read this book, having read other works surrounding the mission that killed Bin Laden especially the work No Easy Day.  I was glad that I read it because this book definitely manage to contribute to the conversation of what happened that day.  What makes this book unique is that this book was written by a former SEAL who interviewed the SEALs operators involved with the Bin Laden raid.  From these interviews the author attempt to synthesize all the accounts from the SEALs (some of which the author admit were conflicting) in order to give a better narrative of what happened that day.

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Yesterday Navy SEAL Edward Byers received his medal of honor.

I get emotional seeing these things.

The Christian missionary doctor they rescued has written his story in a book that I have reviewed here: Kidnapped By the Taliban by Dilip Joseph.

 

 

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I’m still posting book reviews from my Memorial Day Weekend.

First Seals The Untold Story of the Forging of America S Most Elite Unit

Patrick K O Donnell.  First Seals: The Untold Story of the Forging of America’s Most Elite Unit.  Boston, MA: Da Capo Press, October 28th, 2014. 320 pp.

The title of the book could be somewhat misleading.  One might think this is a book on the early history of the US Navy SEALs which began its origin with the Navy Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT) during World War Two.  Typically most books on the history of the SEALs trace their lineage to the UDTs.  Instead this book focuses the Office of Strategic Services’ Maritime Unit (MU).  After getting over the initial expectation that this was going to be about the SEALs or the UDT the book turned out to be an amazing account of the men and the operations of Maritime Unit that was much ahead in their days of Naval commando operations even compated to their contemporary UDTs with the MU’s advance technological breathing masks, sea-to-land direct actions, parachuting capabilities, support for partisan fighters behind enemy lines, sabotage and advanced reconnaissance.  Like the modern SEALs of today the role of those in the MU were at times blurred from land and sea operations.  This book tells the incredible stories of these men that read like a novel.  The most harrowing account in the book is the story of Navy Lt. Jack Taylor who was captured by the Nazis deep within enemy lines and was sent to a concentration camp.  Taylor was marked for death many times by the Nazis but camp clerks who were made up of prisoners themselves kept on erasing his name and/or going in line ahead of him whenever the Nazis gathered people to be killed.  Many of these European prisoners wanted Taylor to be alive so that America and Western Europe would have an American witness of the Camp’s atrocities and therefore convinced the West that the Holocaust was real.  It made me tear up seeing how those in the Concentration Camp can act almost like animals in survival mode but somehow in the midst of the all the salvage brutality the all too human concern for truth and justice manage to come out.  This is an incredibly good book.

Purchase: Amazon

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