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Archive for the ‘Parenting’ Category

Establish the need: Have you wonder how do you spiritually disciplining your children?

 

Review: Last session we saw the three Bs concerning how to discipline your kids.

  • Be clear with rules
  • Be self-controlled
  • Be in a private place

 

Purpose: Today we will see three more points concerning how to discipline your kids.

  • Seek confession
  • Spank appropriate area
  • Seek brokenness

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Establish the need: Have you wonder how do you spiritually disciplining your children?

 

Purpose: we will see the three Bs concerning how to discipline your kids.

  • Be clear with rules
  • Be self-controlled
  • Be in a private place

 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Paul Tautges and Karen Tautges. Help! My Toddler Rules the House. Wapwallopen, PA: Shepherd Press, June 30th 2014. 64 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Are you looking for a book concerning how to parent young children biblically?  Specifically with the issue of toddlers’ problem of whining, misbehavior and being out of control?  This counseling “mini-books” is immensely helpful on this topic.  I highly recommend it to parents and those who minister to young parents.  Like the other three booklets I read in this series this one also turned out to be very useful.

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Establish the need: What is your greatest priority for your kids? What do you desire the most for your kids?  Is it for them to have a good job, take care of you when you are older, contribute to society or be independent?  These are not wrong in of themselves, but what should your greatest priority for your kids should be?

Purpose: Today we will see seven reasons why we should set the priority of desiring our children’s’ salvation in how we parent our children.

  1. Hell is a real place for sinners (Matthew 10:28, Matthew 13:50)
  2. We should already desire all people to come to Christ (1 Timothy 2:4, Romans 9:3, Romans 11:14)
  3. All parents should desire what’s best for their kids (Matthew 7:11; Proverbs 13:22)
  4. Jesus does not want us to hinder children coming to Him (Matthew 19:14)
  5. Stumbling little kids is a serious penalty (Matthew 18:6)
  6. It is so important believers are called to continue to be married to unbelievers for the sake of children’s salvation (1 Corinthians 7:12-14)
  7. God wants kids to even silence the mockers (Psalm 8:2, Matthew 21:15-16)

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I’ve been on vacation this week with my family.  I’ll be posting more book reviews as a result of this break from ministry.

Arlene Pellicane. Parents Rising: 8 Strategies for Raising Kids Who Love God, Respect Authority, and Value What’s Right by Arlene Pellicane.  Chicago, IL: Moody Publishing, April 3rd, 2017. 176 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is a Christian book on parenting.  The author is Arlene Pellicane who is a public speaker on Christian parenting and she is a frequent guest on various radio show interviews such as Fox & Friends, Focus on the Family, and The 700 Club.  I admit I’m frequently on guard with “pop Christian” self-help sort of books and resources and my guard was up reading this book.  Nevertheless I did find this book useful.

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Purchase: Amazon

Originally I was not sure if I wanted to read this book, as I don’t really have daddy issues. But this book turns out to be good not only from the perspective of a son on a father but of a father to their son as well. This book will capture the readers attention: It is witty, biblical and practical. It is interwoven with personal story but not in excess. I am glad I read it. I believe the author is onto something concerning the problem of men with their fathers. He’s also dead-on with the problems of men who blame their dad for everything as an escape from responsibility. I love how the book makes a conscious attempt to be Gospel centered as the solution to various problems from identifying true masculinity (which means being servant like) to sexuality and pornography. He emphasize also gospel driven motives for sanctification rather than “do better” mentality we can so easily slip into. Change and try harder is not good enough and does not go far enough: We need to realize we have sins that we need to God to repent about!
I enjoyed several illustrations from the book that really sinks in deep in making the author’s point: He had a good point about how no responsible fathers would ever teach their children on how to ride a bike for the first time by going on a hill, giving them a few advice concerning their bike lesson and let them go down hill into oncoming traffic. Yet that’s what we do with our sons when it comes to guidance when it comes to the area of sex. A few pat on the back, and the assumption that they will “figure it out,” never mind that the world is teaching them about sex rather than having them be informed Biblicall that sex is serving one another out of love and not selfish gratification.
The other illustration I enjoyed was his reference to ax, how if you only seen horror film your first encounter with an ax would be shaped by the perversion of what that ax is used for. However, ax is not bad in of itself, especially if it’s used for what it’s originally intended for such as chopping up fire wood for the fire place. This is analogous to sex: our culture has preverted it so much that we think it’s bad because our mind is informed by the perversion of the good. It’s important that fathers then inform and provide real guidance of the biblical view of sex–and biblical everything else for that matter. Good book. Recommend this book.

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Purchase: Amazon

Why would a Christian blog that focuses heavily on apologetics and theology take the time to review a work on Christian parenting?

I believe that to apply a robust Christian worldview by addressing only the issues of evangelism/apologetics at the academic/intellectual level without incorporating it at the grass root level of the church and the family would be making a great omission of being relevant culturally in the long run.  Since the church and the family is part of the institution that makes up the fabric of society, if we don’t address good Christian parenting and families, than the vehicle for truth in the lives of the next generation would become like a leaky pipe–it pours forth water but leaks out so much and have so much foreign objects intermingle within it to make it ineffective in imparting life sustaining and cleaning resource.

Readers should probably know a little about the author–that he was an Anglican Bishop of Evangelical persuasion who lived most of his life in the 1800s (he died midway through 1900).  Yet, this short work turns out to be still relevant for parenting today.  There were nuggets of wisdom offered throughout the work.  For instance, the author brings out a great point that it’s easy for parents to see what other parents does wrong.  Yet in the midst of this parents must examine themselves that they are parenting in a way that honors God.  I like the point Ryle made about making sure we teach our children to obey even if they don’t understand, but that they understand your love for them and care should be something they trust in even if they don’t understand with their feeble minds.  I thought that was a good analogy of our Christian faith with God the Father as well.  Also a good point was made about not spoiling your kids because a spoiled child in the end is not going to be a happy child.  I was also very encouraged by the point the author made that sometimes it’s okay to teach our children spiritual matters even if they might not understand it right then and there (of course, that’s not an excuse to work hard in bringing things down to the kid’s level).  This work was an encouragement for me as a new father of a child less than one year old–and as I realize the need of our times is Christian parents to raise up their children under the admonition of the Lord and the discipleship of children under a Christian worldview.

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