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Archive for the ‘Ravi Zacharias’ Category

I’m preaching at a retreat but real quick I wanted to share this clip of Ravi Zacharias in action with apologetics during a question and answer session:

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2015 Nabeel Debate Ally

Those of you who have visited our blogs in the past will not be strangers to Nabeel Qureshi.  He now works with Ravi Zacharias’ ministry.  It was a pleasure to read that he has finished his MD, have gone on to complete two master’s degree in religion and apologetics respectively and is currently working on a PhD in New Testament.  On April 8, 2015 at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, Nabeel Qureshi and Imam Dr. Shabir Ally debated the question, “What Is God Really Like: Tawhid or Trinity?”

Here is the three hours moderated debate:

Enjoy!

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This is another work by Ravi Zacharias where he writes of an imaginary dialogue between famous people in history. In this book, it centers on the conversation between Hitler and Jesus. I’ve enjoyed other works by the author in the similar vein as this book, but I thought this particular book in the Great Conversations series was not as superb as the one Zacharias wrote on Jesus and Buddha titled, The Lotus and the Cross. It is hard to situate a realistic setting of Jesus dialoguing with Hitler, and the beginning of the book begins with an American tourist in Germany with his German friend touring historical World War Two sites in a contemporary context. They end up imagining what the last moments of Hitler’s life was like, and then Hitler waking up to face Jesus. Jesus ushers in other witnesses such as Hitler’s henchmen and victims. I thought the book had quite a long dialogue with Bonheffer with Hitler in the presence of Hitler. In fact, it seems Bonhoffer spoke more than Jesus! I know that the book’s main point was not to articulate a political philosophy, but I thought some of the dialogues would provoke the readers to think more deeply about a Christian theology of the State. The question of whether or not Hitler could have repented and become a Christian is raised at least twice throughout the book, and that sets it up with a dramatic ending of Hitler going to hell because he can’t imagine his own enemy being forgiven and going to heaven. Ravi has done well in his other books that are similar to this book, though this time I do think there were some cheesy parts that I don’t think appeared in his other works.

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This work is a response to the atheist Sam Harris, playing on Harris’ title “The End of Faith.” The author, Ravi Zacharias, is a capable writer and expresses clear and calm thinking throughout the book. Those who are familiar with Zacharias’ other work will expect to find the author’s tact, logical deconstruction and personal winsomeness, and certainly such readers will not be disappointed here. Those who spend some time following the New Atheist crowd will immediately notice the difference of tone and rhetoric that Zacharias display throughout the book versus those of the radical New Atheists. I’ve enjoyed the fact that the book’s approach was not a line by line refutation of Harris, but rather an attempt of a critique in terms of atheism as a worldview. This is helpful, and Zacharias’ strength of cultural and philosphical literacy is displayed in this work. Like many of the response to the New Atheist, this work is short (coming in a little over a hundred page) but I believe it is still powerful. Readers who want to engage more of Zacharias’ line of arguments or wish to see his ideas flushed out more elsewhere should read his other works, in particular “Can Man live without God” and “The Real Face of Atheism.”

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The book is an imaginary conversation that Jesus would have with Buddha. This is Ravi Zacharias at his best, and my favorite of his books that I have read. Ravi opens up the book by situating it with a wonderful description of a Buddhist country, and while he never na…mes the country, one soon realize that the river setting he describe in his travel is Thailand. Even as he describe it, I can imagine the Mekong River (how I would love to go one day, being that I am Laotian-Chinese American). But among the beautiful scenery, he describe the tragedy of a news story he read about a Thai prostitute that eventually burned down her house as a sucidal escape. Here, the author ponders about what Jesus and Buddha would have to say and offer her. Thus, he launches into the meat of the book. Ravi does an excellent job here. For an apologist, the author is able to weave in great apologetics with tact, gentleness and creativity. Often apologist can carry what I call “battle-rattle” (what in the Marine we call our war gear, so much of it can be so clumsy on us, but needed for the tool of the trade), with technical terms and jargon for the toughest of opponents. In this book Zacharias was able to write for the general reading audience and yet manage to give penetrating insight into the internal philosophical inconsistencies within Buddhism. Another plus was the way Zacharias was able to put into Biblical motif and illustrations in Jesus response. Zacharias is truly a master wordsmith in writing the dialogue. As a former atheist born into a Buddhist household that turned Christian, I thought Zacharias did a fair job in portraying as true to life as possible what one can imagine Buddha and Jesus would say. The ending is also touching, marking the biggest difference between Jesus and Buddha, and what Jesus ends with in his address to the Thai prostitute is gripping–intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. Read it for yourself!

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