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Archive for the ‘Politically Incorrect Guide’ Category

Carrie L. Lukas Politically Incorrect guide

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This is a good book written by a woman who has concerns with contemporary feminism. No doubt this book’s stance would be controversial. After I finished the book I read some reviews online and I thought some of the critics were rather unfair. For instance, one review I read accused the author of saying women should earn less money then men, that a working woman would be a horrible mom, etc., which reveals more about the lack of attention of detail of the reviewer than the book itself. The author is nuance enough in the book to say that polls and studies show that women sometimes pursue occupational choices based on flexibility over the concern of salary and no where does she say women should earn less money than that of the work of man. A careful reading of the book would indicate that the author realizes that sometimes moms have to work and she gently presses that the public should know about concerns of the correlation of leaving a child in day care with problems. She’s even nuance enough to say that this does not mean day care itself is the root of all children’s problem. Contrary to some feminists whom she quotes that has a hatred for marriage, the author defends that marriage is not necessarily always a bad thing for woman (though of course there can be such a thing as a bad marriage, but it’s not marriage per se that’s bad). Statistics and studies show that married adults are healthier, financially better of, have more emotional satisfying sex and live more satisfying life than those not married. She also debunks popular urban legend that marriage tend to foster domestic abuse on women, since the data indicate most abuse occur in a non-married situation where couples are shacking up. I’m glad that the book argue that divorce should not be taken lightly as some feminists make it to be. I wish the chapter on abortion could have been better written since this chapter’s main focus was for women to have access to information from both camp rather be one-sided in being pro-choice. Worthwhile read.

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Politically Incorrect Guide to American Literature

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Let me preface my review with my observation of English classes at the college level. I’ve always felt that English class was a way for some professors to sneak in ideological causes to their students from other fields but without the academic rigors required in the respective field it came from. For instance Marxism or Fabian socialism wouldn’t stand up in the field of economic and historical analysis, but in the past I’ve seen it imported wholesale into the English classroom. Certain philosophy wouldn’t be able to stand under logical and philosophical scrutiny but it’s brought into the English classroom, safely away from the use of syllogisms and the philosophical prying eye that is conscious of whether logical premises leads necessarily to the conclusion. History is presented in works of fiction without consciousness of historiography and attacks on Christianity are read while omitting the literature produced in the discipline of Christian apologetics and philosophy. How many students are told to only interact with the assigned texts as evidences when the assigned readings come from extreme sources (I’m thinking of my time in undergraduate reading Michael Moore and recently a friend who had to read Karen Armstrong for English class!). Which makes this Politically Incorrect Guide to English and American Literature refreshing. I appreciated the author’s survey of the Classical works without the sterotypical Leftists’ literary theories. It was great to have this book made me appreciate Jane Austen’s works for her portrayal of gender roles, true love and the value of Chasity and morally bounded love while also being humorous in capturing people’s quirkiness. The book discusses Shakespeare’s works without engaging in queer theory; while I don’t think I’ll be reading Shakespeare anytime soon nevertheless the book made me realize that he was quite insightful into human nature in his plays. The author also talked about the biographies of various authors and I was most fascinated with how some English authors began being radical end up being more conservative during the time of the French Revolutionary War. Overall a great book that ought to be read as a guide to literature. I find this work to be helpful for the Christian given the author’s conservative perspective and consciousness of avoiding Marxists, Feminists, Statists and anti-religious overtones that color so much of what gets passed as “American Literature.” It is imperative for the Christian to even evaluate their fictional books from a Christian worldview and this work is helpful towards that consciousness.

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