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Archive for the ‘Reformed Baptist’ Category

 

A Defense of Calvinism Spurgeon

I love how this book begins with Spurgeon making the point that it is important to be grounded with right doctrines and the right Gospel early on as a Christian.  He even have a great illustration of this: “If a tree has to be taken up two or three times a year, you will not need to build a very large loft in which to store the apples.”  With such an opening my interests for this booklet was perked.

Technically this booklet wasn’t necessarily a point by point proof of the five point of Calvinism, often called “TULIP.”  It is really more of a general defense of God’s sovereignty in salvation.  Of course since Spurgeon is a Calvinist this booklet definitely touches on the points of Calvinism even if it isn’t as systematic as other defense of Calvinism might be.  Spurgeon shares his thought on “free will” in light of his own observation of the depravity in his own heart and also the doctrine of Total Depravity.  The bulk of the book makes observation and arguments from Christian understanding of salvation in general and how it makes sense from a high view of God’s Sovereignty.  Spurgeon also deals with the objection that the doctrine of Sovereign Grace leads to an excuse of living a life of habitual sins.  Edifying read.

Chapel Library has this work for free in various electronic format if you click HERE.

If you really want to purchase this for your Kindle Device through Amazon for a cheap cost, click HERE.

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James E Dolezal theology

I’ve enjoyed listening to all the audios from this conference.  I’ve seen multiple people shared it earlier this past fall but I’ve completed it not too long ago and also purchased his book.

Here’s a quick biography of the speaker:

James E. Dolezal, Ph.D., teaches theology, philosophy, and church history at Cairn University in Langhorne, PA. He is a graduate of The Master’s Seminary and Westminster Theological Seminary. He is the author of God without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God’s Absoluteness as well numerous journal articles and reviews. Prior to moving to the east coast he served as a Reformed Baptist pastor in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. James is married to Courtney and they have three children: Judah, Havah, and Eden. James is active in supplying pulpits in the Philadelphia area. 

Below are the audios (note the first one is not by Dr. Dolezal):

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James White

Reformed Apologist Dr. James White, of Alpha & Omega Ministries have recently traveled to Spain to debate in person Rev.Dr. Thomas Norris, Priest of the Diocese of Ossory on the motion, ¨The Church would have been better off without the Reformation.¨  Revelation TV hosted this debate on April 15th, 2015.

Here’s the promotional video leading up to the debate:

Revelation TV have not loaded the two hour debate on Youtube yet but the video is available on their website.

You can access the debate by clicking HERE.

 

 

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James White

We have posted on our blog various debates by James White that his ministry has recently made available for free for viewing on Youtube.  About two weeks ago Dr. White’s ministry posted a video titled “James White and Tom Ascol – The Debate that Never Was.”  While technically this is not a debate, the context of this video was originally there was suppose to be a debate on the topic of Calvinism between James White teaming up with Tom Ascol between Ergun and Emir Caner.  That debate at Liberty University was cancelled and James White in another conference presented his discussion not too long after the cancellation.  For those of you guys that followed the controversy some years ago, you would probably remember things were pretty heated.  It is interesting to look back a few years later and see where Ergun Caner’s ministry and life has headed.

Here’s the video of the discussion between Reformed Baptists James White and Tom Ascol of the Founders’ Ministry:

May it be for the edification for God’s People in Sound and Biblical doctrine.

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THe Gospel Focus of Spurgeon

This book is part of a series by Ligonier Ministries called “A Long Line of Godly Men Profile.”  I’ve enjoyed other books in this series and this one also live up to my expectation.  The author Steve Lawson himself is an excellent Reformed preacher which makes the book insightful since this is a biography of a preacher by a preacher.  In the beginning of the book Lawson made an interesting point of the line of godly men in the Reformed tradition: “If John Calvin was the greatest theologian of the church, Jonathan Edwards the greatest philosopher, and George Whitefield the greatest evangelist, Spurgeon surely ranks as its greatest preacher” (1).  Spurgeon is often called today “the Prince of Preachers,” who faithfully preached the Gospel with much power of the Holy Spirit for nearly four decades.

This biography is not just about time and dates in Spurgeon’s life but a biography of his theology.  After the first chapter on Spurgeon’s life and legacy, the rest of the chapters was on how his theology drove Spurgeon’s ministry.  I especially appreciated the chapter on Sovereign grace in Spurgeon’s preaching and also the chapter on Spurgeon’s evangelistic fervor.

I learned several things from the book about Spurgeon’s life that I did not know previously.  For instance, I did not know Spurgeon did not have any formal theological training, having not attended any seminary or degrees yet he was quite theologically astute.  Before reading the book I knew Spurgeon was a ferocious reader and I now further appreciate Spurgeon’s tenacity in self-education!  I saw as application for preachers today is to continuously grow in one’s theology and not just resort to thinking one need not grow just because of one’s “success” in ministry or because of a theological degree one has attained in the past.

I’ve also learned that Spurgeon founded the Pastor’s College at the age of twenty two, which is all the more remarkable given his lack of formal theological education.  The book also mentioned how for the first fifteen years of the school Spurgeon himself covered the cost of the school by the sales of his weekly sermon.  There is something encouraging to see a man who is so committed to training up godly and biblical pastors that he puts his own money and time into it.

I was also much encouraged by Spurgeon’s example when I learned how often Spurgeon preached during the week.  Lawson stated in the book that Spurgeon preached as much as ten times during the week.  My favorite quote from Spurgeon in the book is the following: “We find ourselves able to preach ten or twelve times a week, and we find we are the stronger for it…‘Oh,’ said one of the members, ‘our minister will kill himself.’…That is the kind of work that will kill no man.  It is preaching to sleepy congregations that kill good ministers” (14).

I recommend this book for all Christians, given how Spurgeon is so widely read still today.  I especially recommend this book for Pastors to be rekindled as a preacher to have a Gospel focus like Spurgeon.  Sometimes historical theology can be quite edifying when we want examples of godly men and virtues of guys who are closer to us than those who are far removed from our time.  The author did a good job balancing honoring Spurgeon while not idolizing him, and Lawson is able to do this in the book by looking at Spurgeon’s theology, which points us towards Jesus, the Gospel and the Bible.

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

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