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Archive for the ‘Thanksgiving’ Category

The Struggle of Thanking God

Selected Verse

Establish the need: Do you regularly thank God?

Purpose: Today we shall see three points concerning prayers of thanksgiving towards God so that we be daily thanking God starting today.

  • We are commanded to thank God
  • Struggles of thanking God
  • Helps for thanking God

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Veritas domain thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving to you all!

We have many reasons to be thankful to God!  Especialy our salvation made possible through the Father’s Plan, the Son’s sacrifice and the Spirit’s conviction and regeneration!

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Susan Lutz. Thankfulness: Even When It Hurts.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, April 1st 2002. 22 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This biblical counseling booklet addresses the issue of being thankful.  Specifically it addresses the need to be thankful to God even when there is life difficulties.  The booklet is part of a series called “Resources for Changing Lives” printed by Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing and this was one of the earlier volumes.  Like other booklets in this series this was helpful.  Personally I have used this particular title for own edification, for counseling as a Pastor, for a devotional with my wife and also I’m planning on reading it together with one of our church’s small group.

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In the United States tomorrow (Thursday) will be Thanksgiving.

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GO TO PART 43

Point: Sometimes when one engage in apologetics the issue of alleged Bible contradiction comes up and the example given of a Bible contradiction really isn’t a Bible contradiction but an instance where one account gives lesser detail than another account.  Think for instance of those who raise the question “How many men were possessed with demons at the country of the Gadarenes?”  Are there examples we can give in other areas outside of the Bible of how such a tactic to claim there’s a Bible contradiction is problematic?

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I know there are many great spiritual things I am thankful for.  But I’m also thankful to God’s common grace in other things as well such as the relative freedom the United States have compared to other parts of the world.

I watched many times this video of the fleeing North Korean defector for the last twenty four hours.  I watched it because it was quite dramatic.  And since this is near Thanksgiving it left me grateful for God’s grace and mercy that I’m in a country where I’m not on the run away from a tyrant that’s out of control.

I don’t want to get too personal but both my parents have fled communism under some very dramatic circumstances.  This made me think about how evil communism is and also thankful to God that my life is so much better because of my mom and my father fleeing two different communist nations.

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Veritas domain thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving to you all!

We have many reasons to be thankful to God!  Especialy our salvation made possible through the Father’s Plan, the Son’s sacrifice and the Spirit’s conviction and regeneration!

Read Full Post »

Veritas domain thanksgiving

Have a Blessed Thanksgiving brothers and sisters.

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Happy Thanksgiving bible

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you!

We are thankful to God for our family, friends and church.

We are thankful to God for all the readers of this blog.

Here are some blog links on Thanksgiving from some of our blogging friends:

The First Thanksgiving: The Back Story

My Thanksgiving !!!!!!

Thanksgiving: The Primary Worship Response

Share with us, what are some things that you are thankful to God for?

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Happy Thanksgiving bible

 

Happy Thanksgiving to you all.

We are Thankful to God for many things–Salvation, a great Savior Jesus, the Church and His Election.

Among them include the privilege of blogging and all of you who have visited our blog and shared with us your life and doctrine!

Two posts on Thanksgiving devotionals worth by two of our friends that are worth sharing:

THANKSGIVING: Thank God for the Appointing of the Redeemer and His Gracious Condescension

30 Days Of Thankfulness Series Links…

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This verse comes into mind concerning the duties of thanksgiving:

21 For even though they knew God, they did not [n]honor Him as God or give thanks, but they became futile in their speculations, and their foolish heart was darkened. 22 Professing to be wise, they became fools, 23 and exchanged the glory of the incorruptible God for an image in the form of corruptible man and of birds and four-footed animals and[o]crawling creatures.

No doubt this verse shows a relationship between thanksgiving, idolatrous religion, and apologetics.

Here are two quick links to two short articles that I thought should lead the apologist to have a more deeper thanksgiving this time of the year.

1.) An Atheist Explanation of Thanksgiving by Chris Bolt.

2.) All Dressed Up and No One to Thank by John MacArthur.

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Happy Thanksgiving Ladies and Gentleman.

Be sure to remember to thank God for all His grace, mercy and kindness.

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Listen (or read) to John Piper on Thankfulness.

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Thanksgiving

Most Americans are familiar with the Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving Feast of 1621, but few realize that it was not the first festival of its kind in North America. Long before Europeans set foot in the Americas, native peoples sought to insure a good harvest with dances and rituals such as the Green Corn Dance of the Cherokees.

The first Thanksgiving service known to be held by Europeans in North America occurred on May 27, 1578 in Newfoundland, although earlier Church-type services were probably held by Spaniards in La Florida. However, for British New England, some historians believe that the Popham Colony in Maine conducted a Thanksgiving service in 1607 (see Sources: Greif, 208-209; Gould, and Hatch). In the same year, Jamestown colonists gave thanks for their safe arrival, and another service was held in 1610 when a supply ship arrived after a harsh winter. Berkley Hundred settlers held a Thanksgiving service in accordance with their charter which stated that the day of their arrival in Virginia should be observed yearly as a day of Thanksgiving, but within a few years an Indian uprising ended further services (Dabney). Thus British colonists held several Thanksgiving services in America before the Pilgrim’s celebration in 1621.

The Pilgrims, with a puritanical rejection of public religious display, held a non-religious Thanksgiving feast, aside from saying grace. In fact, they seem to have used the three days for feasting, playing games, and even drinking liquor.

In 1623, the Pilgrims at Plymouth Plantation, Massachusetts, held another day of Thanksgiving. As a drought was destroying their crops, colonists prayed and fasted for relief; the rains came a few days later. And not long after, Captain Miles Standish arrived with staples and news that a Dutch supply ship was on its way. Because of all this good fortune, colonists held a day of Thanksgiving and prayer on June 30. This 1623 festival appears to have been the origin of our Thanksgiving Day because it combined a religious and social celebration.

Festivals of Thanksgiving were observed sporadically on a local level for more than 150 years. They tended to be autumn harvest celebrations. But in 1789, Elias Boudinot, Massachusetts, member of the House of Representatives, moved that a day of Thanksgiving be held to thank God for giving the American people the opportunity to create a Constitution to preserve their hard won freedoms. A Congressional Joint Committee approved the motion, and informed President George Washington. On October 3, 1789, the President proclaimed that the people of the United States observe “a day of public thanksgiving and prayer” on Thursday, the 26th of November.

The next three Presidents proclaimed, at most, two days of thanksgiving sometime during their terms of office, either on their own initiative or at the request of a joint Resolution of Congress. One exception was Thomas Jefferson, who believed it was a conflict of church and state to require the American people hold a day of prayer and thanksgiving. President James Madison proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving to be held on April 13, 1815, the last such proclamation issued by a President until Abraham Lincoln did so in 1862.

Most of the credit for the establishment of an annual Thanksgiving holiday may be given to Sarah Josepha Hale. Editor of Ladies Magazine and Godey’s Lady’s Book, she began to agitate for such a day in 1827 by printing articles in the magazines. She also published stories and recipes, and wrote scores of letters to governors, senators, and presidents. After 36 years of crusading, she won her battle. On October 3, 1863, buoyed by the Union victory at Gettysburg, President Lincoln proclaimed that November 26, would be a national Thanksgiving Day, to be observed every year on the fourth Thursday of November.

Only twice has a president changed the day of observation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in order to give depression-era merchants more selling days before Christmas, assigned the third Thursday to be Thanksgiving Day in 1939 and 1940. But he was met with popular resistance, largely because the change required rescheduling Thanksgiving Day events such as football games and parades. In 1941, a Congressional Joint Resolution officially set the fourth Thursday of November as a national holiday for Thanksgiving.

Today, Thanksgiving is a time when many families come together, and many churches are open for special services. We have both Native Americans and immigrants to thank for the opportunity to observe a day of thanksgiving.

By the President of the United States of America–

A Proclamation

Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor–and Whereas both Houses of Congress have by their Joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.”

Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be–That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks–for his kind care and protection of the People of this country previous to their becoming a Nation–for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his providence, which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war–for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed–for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted, for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.

And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions–to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually–to render our national government a blessing to all the People, by constantly being a government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed–to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shown kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord–To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and Us–and generally to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.

Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.

Go. Washington

The source of this article is taken from here.

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