Archive for the ‘Theonomy’ Category


I have been blown away with Deuteronomy’s discussion of Israel’s king.  First it anticipates a king arising out of Israel hundreds of years before it happened.  Secondly I’m amazed at the limits imposed on the kings of Israel in contrast to other kings of the surrounding region.  And thirdly, I think there are some implication for this today.

Here’s the passage from Deuteronomy 17:14-20:

“When you enter the land which the Lord your God gives you, and you possess it and live in it, and you say, ‘I will set a king over me like all the nations who are around me,’ 15 you shall surely set a king over you whom the Lord your God chooses, one from among your [l]countrymen you shall set as king over yourselves; you may not put a foreigner over yourselves who is not your [m]countryman. 16 Moreover, he shall not multiply horses for himself, nor shall he cause the people to return to Egypt to multiply horses, since the Lord has said to you, ‘You shall never again return that way.’ 17 He shall not multiply wives for himself, [n]or else his heart will turn away; nor shall he greatly increase silver and gold for himself.

18 “Now it shall come about when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself a copy of this law on a scroll [o]in the presence of the Levitical priests. 19 It shall be with him and he shall read it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the Lord his God, [p]by carefully observing all the words of this law and these statutes, 20 that his heart may not be lifted up above his [q]countrymen and that he may not turn aside from the commandment, to the right or the left, so that he and his sons may continue long in his kingdom in the midst of Israel.

Now I realize this text is primarily talking about Israel and not say the United States, Canada, etc.  But I think there are some implications for today.



Read Full Post »

Liberty Defined Ron Paul

Ron Paul. Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom by Ron Paul.  New York, NY: Grand Central Publishing, April 19th, 2011.325 pp.

            In light of this being an election year I think this book is quite relevant to read even though neither Ron Paul nor his son is in the election.  What I appreciate about Ron Paul is his conscious effort in being principled in his approach towards politics and this book truly reflect what’s important for him: Liberty.  He makes the point that the term liberty can be quite misconstrued today so it is important to talk about what liberty is and the importance of safeguarding it.


Read Full Post »

This is part of our short series on Superheroes, Comics and Worldview.  The following are comics that I found intriguing in that they have a political overtone and message.  Specifically they warn the readers of the danger of Statism.

V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

Alan Moore. V for Vendetta. New York, NY: DC Comics, October 12th, 2005. 296 pp.

I read this nearly a year ago back in January and it still left a strong impression on my mind.  I can only compare to this to George Orwell’s 1984.  It is a 1984 with a superhero, if V could be called that.  Originally written in the 1980s it is a story about a future England in 1997 and 1998 in which the government has become tyrannical and authoritarian with a sole dictator on top who is obsessed with his computer dictating to him things by chance.  As powerful and smart as those within government think they are, one lone vigilante suddenly challenges all that.  What’s incredible is that our hero goes about doing what he does while singing, rhyming and throwing out witty slogans.  This shows the incredible genius of the writer Alan Moore and he even manage to alliterate each section of the book with the letter V.  Incredible.  As our hero carry his subversive campaign to undermine the evil government and cause the people to rise up we are also drawn into the story in learning more of the mystery of the origin of V and his motivation to fight the regime.  Although the story does have a bit of the left leaning taste there is still a powerful lesson about the dangers of Statism.

Christian Reflection: 

As I said earlier this book does have the same feel as 1984.  This reminds us just how dark a tyrannical government can be and how the mass could simply let the government do the evils they do.  While our hero is a lone revolutionary as a Christian we must not believe in vigilante justice or call for the rebellious overthrow of the government.  This of course is different from the duties of the lower magistrate to disobey wrongful orders from their superiors.  Christians must be very careful not to subscribe to the pagan ideology that chaos (revolution) will reproduce order.

NOTE: I did not watch the movie nor do I plan on reading it.



Read Full Post »

homosexuality a biblical view greg bahnsen

The late Christian apologist Greg Bahnsen has written a little known book on a biblical view of homosexuality.  The Evangelical Christian Library has hosted this book for free online here.

Here is the table of Content:

Back Cover of the Book

Preface … 5

1. Basic Commitments … 13

The Foundational Question of Scripture … 14

The Law as an Expression of God’s Will … 19

2. Homosexuality as a Sin … 27

The Creation Account … 28

The Story of Sodom … 31

God’s Law … 35

Romans 1 … 47

3. The Act / Orientation Distinction and Causes of Homosexuality … 63

4. The Response of the Church : Hope for Homosexuals … 85

5. The Response of Society : Homosexual Acts as Criminal … 99

6. Conclusion … 125

Read Full Post »


I was asked about my opinion about this news story, “Shelby church to fly Christian flag over American flag.

My take on it?

I was never comfortable with the idea of a Christian flag to begin with. I don’t know why the media made this a big story. The Marines have a saying in terms of priorities: “God. Country. Corps.” They even use it for their advertisement. This is a non-story that media is hyping about; why would the media be surprised that serious Christians put God first?

Read Full Post »

Lenin Face palm

I didn’t plan to write this three part series on the question “Were Early Christians Communists?”  It was originally in response to someone online and it just kind of happened as I thought about it more I ended up writing more.

I think it would be good to have one posts that links the series.  Here are the links to the three posts:

Were Early Christians Communists? Part 1: Acts 5

Were Early Christians Communists? Part 2: The Semantic of Communism

Were Early Christians Communists? Part 3: Matthew 19:21 and Luke 14:33 in Context

Read Full Post »


There was some discussion on a friend’s blog responding to a nonbeliever’s assertion that Acts 5 demonstrate that the early Christians were Communists.  Acts 5:1-16 is the passage concerning Ananias and Sapphira.

I’ve reproduced my comment here with slight editorial change:

I think the fact that Acts 5 still acknowledged private property does not sit well with a Marxist reading of Acts 5.  Specifically, the Apostle Peter in verse four affirmed the right of private property when he asked Ananias: “While it remained unsold, did it not remain your own? And after it was sold, was it not [b]under your control?”

I would also add that the communal passages such as the one you mentioned here in Acts 5 and also Acts 2:44-45 must also be interpreted in the light of the larger flow of the book of Acts.
We must remember that Acts 1:8 is the “controlling” verse for the direction of the book of Acts. Acts 1:8 is the command Jesus gave the disciples: “but you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be My witnesses both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and even to the remotest part of the earth.” Note there is an emphasis by Jesus that the Gospel is to go outward that comport with Matthew 28:19-20 (what is commonly called the Great Commission).
It seems in light of Acts 1:8 that this gathering of an internal community sharing things in common is not the thing that Jesus or Acts want to stress as normative for the Christian, but it ought to be one of reaching out. In fact it took God bringing a persecution in Acts 8:1-5 that the Acts 1:8 plan gets unfolded (I think my interpretation is justified, note the echoes of Acts 1:8 in Acts 8:1-5 with the term “Jerusalem,” “Judea” and especially the multiple reference to “Samaria.” This point must not be missed).
Acts 8 onwards is more closer to us in terms of the Christian church era and I think Acts 2-7 with the believers gathering together fits in a specific context of Redemptive History in that it was the early Post-Pentecost age when believers from around the world was still getting to know the Gospel more deeply before eventually going back “home” to all the different parts of the Roman empire (see Acts 2 again) and beyond.

I think to pull these passages as supporting Communism does not take into account the immediate context within Acts 5 nor does it take into account the context of the uniqueness of the event in Redemptive History.  In other words, the case for communism from Acts 2 and 5 fail.

In my next post on Wednesday I will address the issue of the term communism, Marxism and the Soviet State.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »