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Archive for the ‘Wikileaks’ Category

wikileaks

I don’t understand why the media has downplayed the wikileaks and the emails of Hillary Clinton.  I’m not going to go over the media’s double standard with how they handle Hillary as opposed to Trump for this post but instead I want to focus on an important spiritual lesson that comes from Hillary’s emails being leaked.

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Wikileaks David Leigh

(Available on Amazon)

In today’s “selfie” age, it’s not enough that the news is news but the process of getting the news has become news itself. But as fast as something has gone viral just as instantly does something fade away in the midst of the next information tid bit. Case in point: Wikileaks. This book is about Julian Assange the founder and spokesman of Wikileaks. The book is written by a journalist from the Guardian an established English newspaper company that cooperated with Wikileaks to publicize some of the US secret cables Wikileaks released. He writes from the third person and it was odd to see instances in the book where David Leigh came up in the third person instead of “I.”
What’s Good:
• Interesting background information behind Wikileaks including the motive and ideology that drove Assange and Private Manning.
• Reveals the back story of the relationship of the mainstream media with Wikileaks
• Honesty of the author’s portrait of Assange, warts and all. One gets the sense that this guy is an egomanic, self-important, undisciplined, unhygienic, paranoid man yet an opportunist, tries to speak out against oppressors, etc.
• Gives us more background to the rape accusation against Assange and also his reluctant confession that it was not a CIA love nest sting.
What’s Bad:
• Sometimes the book overstretch its claim of US military wrong doing in Iraq and Afghanistan uncovered by Wikileaks and at the end of the day, it definitely was not the bombshell that some were expecting it to be.
• Anti-climatic ending of the major news organizations who secretly cooperated with Wikileaks rushing to published stories from the cables. It was so anti-climatic to an interesting topic.
• Redundant feel when the book summarizes something and then quotes the document or online chat using the same words and phrase.
Reflection
I believe our current government has too many secrets and a healthy republic require a more transparent and open government if it’s going to ever be accountable to the people. To that end, I sympathize with Wikileaks even though we are probably coming from a different political spectrum. I’m surprised at how immature both Manning and Assange could get and yet one gets the feeling that one has met such characters before in one’s own life people like Manning and Assange. They are more of a cross section of guys in this generation more than perhaps the author realized. I find Assange as a person to be quite repulsive: the author did a good job filling in the details of one of the accuser against Assange for being sexually wronged by him. Assange is a guy that doesn’t know how to handle women and handle them roughly. I thought the book in telling the story of Assange and Manning could have noted more explicitly the blatant ironies of the two of them. For instance, Assange is strongly for all information to be public—yet ironically, he react strongly against certain information about himself being made public. He says there’s people out there who are ought to smear him from the US government but he goes ahead and smears the women’s reputation and deliberately lies about them and their ideology. Assange runs an organization that has the name “leak” in it but strongly disapproves and threatens editors of the press for acquiring leaks from his own Wikileaks. He even said leaks of the stolen US government cables from Wikileaks is criminal. Oh the irony. It’s very hard to live a consistent worldview that’s reductionistic.

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