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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Spurgeon’

Note: For fans of Spurgeon have you checked out my Review: Charles Spurgeon Framed Art Print?

 

Charles H. Spurgeon. Effective Prayer.  Pensacola, FL: Chapel Library, June 24th 2015. 20 pp.

5 out of 5

Free: Chapel Library

Purchase: Amazon (99 cents for Kindle)

How can you pray more biblically and powerfully?  This booklet is Spurgeon’s sermon on Job 23:3-4 on the topic of praying effectively.  Since 2016 I started reading a number of sermons by the famous English preacher Charles Spurgeon and have desired to read more of his writings so here I am in 2020 still being edified by the content of his preaching.

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A late post today since after my lectures last night I just couldn’t type up a post!  Ever have one of those days?

Charles H. Spurgeon. Free Will a Slave.  Pensacola, FL: Chapel Library, December 3rd 2018. 18 pp.

4 out of 5

Free: Chapel Library

Purchase: Amazon (99 cents for Kindle)

In 2016 I read quite a number of works by the famous English preacher Charles Spurgeon and since then I have desired to read more of his work though sadly I haven’t been able to read any of his works until now in 2020.  This booklet is Spurgeon’s defense of Calvinism by responding to John 5:40 which some Arminians in his day thought it was “one of the great guns of the Arminians” which I’m quoting from Spurgeon in the opening sentences in his booklet.  What Spurgeon aim to show in this booklet is how John 5:40 is actually a support for Calvinism instead.

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I’m going to review something new, different and exciting!

Many of you might know I love Charles Spurgeon.  Though I haven’t read him recently I have read and reviewed and quoted different words from the famous Victorian Era preacher on our blog.

In this post I want to review and recommend a Framed Art Print of the famous Prince of Preachers: Charles Spurgeon.

Purchase:

Framed Mini Art Print | Charles Spurgeon Framed Art Print | Charles Spurgeon Metal Print

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My favorite preacher to read is Charles Spurgeon.  I need to read him more this year.

I pray that I have twice the portion of the Spirit that Spurgeon has.

Here’s two quotes from Charles Spurgeon that really fires me up with preaching.

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These Banner Board Books for children are awesome!  I plan to review the other two

Rebecca VanDoodewaard.  The Woman Who Loved To Give Books: Susannah Spurgeon. Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, November 10th 2017. 16 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This is the first Banner Board Books for kids that I purchased to read to my young daughters who at that time were five years old and under.  I bought it to introduce godly historical figures from church history that would serve as an example to them.  This particular title was on Susannah Spurgeon the wife of the famous English Preacher Charles Spurgeon.

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If you love Church history and/or if you are familiar with Crossway’s Series of books on Theologians on the Christian Life you might be delighted to know that there was a conference in 2017 that covered some of the Theologians in the series.

Personally I have only read only one of the volume in this series which I have reviewed: Review: Schaeffer on the Christian Life: Countercultural Spirituality by William Edgar.  I do plan to read more from this series.

Here are the videos:

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Charles H. Spurgeon. The Secret of Power in Prayer.  Pensacola, FL: Chapel Library, July 17th 2016. 22 pp.

5 out of 5

Free: Chapel Library

Purchase: Amazon (99 cents for Kindle)

This booklet is based upon a sermon delivered by the Prince of Preacher, Charles Spurgeon on the topic of prayer.  I was looking for a short devotional work to encourage my prayer life and this certainly encouraged me to appreciate the privilege of praying to God.  This work is based upon the verse John 15:7.  John 15:7 in the NASB states, “If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you.”  Although Spurgeon preached this message back in 1888 it is relevant even for today, which is a testimony of Spurgeon’s faithful preaching of the Bible, which of course is always relevant for our spiritual life.

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Anyone else a fan of the preacher Charles Spurgeon?  If so what are some of your favorite works?

I really got into reading his messages last year.  If you haven’t done so already I encourage you to read sermons and books by him.  Here’s a witty ditty to that end:

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Charles H. Spurgeon. Heart of the Gospel.  Pensacola, FL: Chapel Library, March 28th 2014. 22 pp.

This is another message by Spurgeon that I read in 2016 in light of my hunger to read things by the Prince of Preacher.  This booklet focuses on 2 Corinthians 5:20-21.  What I appreciate about Spurgeon is that he is essentially timeless because he preaches the Gospel and definitely 2 Corinthians 5:20-21 is a Gospel text.  Although this was originally a sermon by Spurgeon delivered in 1886 it is still relevant for people to read and hear it today.  As I read this booklet I wished there would be more contemporary preachers who embodied the spirit of Spurgeon’s preaching.

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Charles H. Spurgeon. Humility: Micah’s Message for Today.  Pensacola, FL: Chapel Library, June 18th, 2015. 19 pp.

This is an exposition of Micah 6:8 by the Prince of Preacher Charles Spurgeon.  Here in this booklet Spurgeon focuses on the passage’s call for humility.  It was originally based upon a sermon that Spurgeon preached in 1889.  It is amazing to think that this message by a Victorian era preacher can remain relevant for Christians today.  This is a testament of the enduring value of faithful preaching based upon the Bible and also how man’s problem in every age remains basically the same.  Of course, the solution is still found in the same Gospel as given in Scripture!

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struggles-of-conscience-spurgeon

About two weeks ago I posted my Review and Free Booklet: Struggles of Conscience by Charles Spurgeon.  I mentioned in that review that this turned out to have been my favorite work from Spurgeon thus far for this year (I’ve been having a craving for things by Spurgeon this year).

It turns out this book, which was originally a sermon by Spurgeon, is also available as an audio on Youtube!  This is for those who are busy although I always prefer actual reading of a book more than listening to audiobooks if one can.

So here it is below:

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For part one, please see: Charles Spurgeon’s Thoughts on Open-Air Preaching: “A Sketch of its History”

In our last post, we covered a brief sketch on open-air preaching’s history from Spurgeon’s analysis.  In this second post, we will gleaning off from Spurgeon’s analysis on open-air preaching  from more of a logistic’s end.  Here in this section, Spurgeon not only gives reasons, but explains how to best wisely conduct open-air preaching so it may be profitable.

  • “I fear that in some of our less enlightened country churches there are conservative individuals who almost believe that to preach anywhere except in the chapel would be a shocking innovation, a sure token of heretical tendencies, and a mark of zeal without knowledge” (Spurgeon, Lectures to My Students, “Open Air Preaching–Remarks Thereon, “76).
  • “No sort of defence is needed for preaching out of doors; but it would need very potent arguments to prove that a man had done his duty who has never preached beyond the walls of his meeting-house.  A defence is required rather for services within buildings than for worship outside of them.  Apologies are certainly wanted for architects who pile up brick and stone into the skies when there is so much need for preaching rooms among poor sinners down below. Defence is greatly needed for forests of stone pillars, which prevent the preacher’s being seen and his voice from being heard; for high-pitched Gothic roofs in which all sound is lost, and men are killed by being compelled to shout till they burst their bloodvessels; and also for the wilful creation of echoes by exposing hard, sound-refracting surfaces to satisfy the demands of art, to the total overlooking of the comfort of both audience and speaker”  (77).
  • “The great benefit of open-air preaching is that we get so many new comers to hear the gospel who otherwise would never hear it” (78).
  • “Go ye into the highways and hedges and compel them to come in,’–albeit it constitutes part of a parable, is worthy to be taken very literally, and in so doing its meaning will be best carried out.  We ought actually to go into the streets and lanes and highways, for there are lurkers in the hedges, tramps on the highway, street-walkers, and lane-haunters, whom we shall never reach unless we pursue them into their own domains” (78).
  • “Such people hate the very sight of our churches and meeting houses, but will stand in a crowd to hear what is said, and are often most impressed when they affect the greatest contempt” (79).
  • “I am quite sure, too, that if we could persuade our friends in the country to come out to a good many times in the year and hold a service in a meadow, or in a shady grove, or on the hill side, or in a garden, or on a common, it would be all the better for the usual hearers” (80).
  • “London never notices the ceaseless grind of the traffic; so do many members of our congregations become insensible to the most earnest addresses, and accept them  as a matter of course.  Then preaching and the rest of it get to be so usual that they might as well not be at all.  Hence a change of place might be useful, it might prevent monotony, shake up indifference, suggest thought, and in a thousand ways promote attention, and give new hope of doing good” (81).
  • “I am glad to see tents used in London, for the very worst place is better than none, and because they can easily be moved from place to place, and are not very expensive; but still, if I had my choice between having nothing at all and having a tent, I should prefer the open air by far” (81).
  • “If you are going to preach in the open air in the country, you will perhaps have your choice of a spot wherein to preach; if not, of course you must have what you can get, and you must in faith accept it as the very best” (82).
  • “It is well to preach before your regular services on a spot near your place of worship, so as to march the crowd right into the building before they know what they are about” (82).
  • “Amphitheaters and hillsides are always favourite spots with preachers in the fields, and their advantages will be at once evident to you” (83).
  • “Do not try to preach against the wind, for it is an idle attempt” (85).
  • “One of the earliest things that a minister should do when he leaves College and settles in a country town or village is to begin open air speaking” (86).
  • “In London, or any other large town, it is a great thing to find a vacant spot where you can obtain a right to hold services at your pleasure” (86).
  • “Get the people to listen outside that they may by-and-by worship inside.  You want no pulpit, a chair will do, or by the kerb of the road.  The less formality the better, and if you begin by merely talking to the two or three around you and make no pretence of sermonizing you will do well.  More good may be done by personal talk to one than by a rhetorical address to fifty” (87).
  • “I am somewhat pleased when I occasionally hear of a brother’s being locked up by the police, for it does him good, and it does the people good also” (88).
  • “I am persuaded that the more of open air preaching there is in London the better” (88).
  • “In the street, a man must keep himself alive, and use many illustrations and anecdotes, and sprinkle a quaint remark here and there” (89).
  • “Short sentences of words and short passages of thought are needed for out of doors” (89).
  • “In the streets a man must from beginning to end be intense, and for that very reason he must be condensed and concentrated in his thought and utterance” (90).
  • “Shams and shows will have no mercy from a street gathering.  But have something to say, look them in the face, say what you mean, put it plainly, bodly, earnestly, courteously, and they will hear you” (90).
  • “The best street preaching is not that which is done at the top of your voice, for it must be impossible to lay the proper emphasis upon telling passages when all along you are shouting with all your might” (92).
  • “One constant rule is to be always courteous and good tempered, for if you become cross or angry it is all over with you.  Another rule is to keep to your subject, and never be drawn into side issues.  Preach Christ or nothing: don’t dispute or discuss except with your eye on the cross” (93).

Here is what you will need according to Charles Spurgeon for the QUALIFICATIONS FOR OPEN-AIR PREACHERS:

  • A good voice.
  • Naturalness of manner.
  • Self-possession.
  • A good knowledge of Scripture and of common things.
  • Ability to adapt himself to any congregation.
  • Good illustrative powers.
  • Zeal, prudence, and common sense.
  • A large, loving heart.
  • Sincere belief in all he says.
  • Entire dependence on the Holy Spirit for success.
  • A close walk with God by prayer.
  • A consistent walk before men by a holy life.

 

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Charles Spurgeon’s thoughts are drawn out from his book Lectures to My Students from “Open Air Preaching–A Sketch of its History” (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to My Students: For the First Time–All Four Books in One, Complete & Unabridged. Pasadena TX: Pilgrim Publications, 1990).

Spurgeon, the Prince of Preachers, has thoughts on open-air preaching that I think is invaluable.  He provides a sketch of its history from times of Jesus through the church.  History cannot be disconnected from this lost art.  Lives have been saved from Hell and babies have been saved from the abortion mill. Jesus and the disciples have ministered in this manner too.  Many of them were kicked out of synagogues and had to resort to the open fields and public square.  Christians also in ages past ministered in this art form and many acts of God were displayed (i.e. revivals, reformation, etc.).  Although there are nomadic open-air preachers out there who are not connected to their local church nor held accountable by their elders; as well as those who only preach law and no grace, should not in anyway deter us away form this art form of preaching.  We cannot let these people hijack this important form of ministry.  Without further adieu, I will let the prince speak now. Here are some quotes that I think you may find helpful. You could see that Spurgeon is drawing out from Scripture and the positive effects it had on history in order to argue for open-air preaching.

As for Jesus, Spurgeon says: “Our Lord himself, who is yet more our pattern, delivered the larger proportion of his sermons on the mountain’s side, or by the sea shore, or in the streets.  Our Lord was to all intents and purposes an open air preacher.  He did not remain silent in the synagogue, but he was equally at home in the field.  We have no discourse of his on record delivered in the chapel royal, but we have the sermon on the mount and the sermon in the plain; so that the very earliest and most divine kind of preaching was practised out of doors by him who spake as never man spake” (54-55).

As for the disciples’ ministry of preaching after Jesus’ death, Spurgeon says: “…Within walls, especially that in the upper room; but the preaching was even then most frequently in the court of the temple, or in such other open spaces as were available.  The notion of holy places and consecrated meeting-houses had not occurred to them as Christians; they preached in the temple because it was the chief place of concourse, but with equal earnestness ‘in every house they ceased not to teach and preach Jesus Christ'” (55).

As for the apostles, Spurgeon says, “The apostles and their immediate successors delivered their message of mercy not only in their own hired houses, and in the synagogues, but also anywhere and everywhere as occasion served them.  This may be gathered incidentally from the following statement of Eusebius.  ‘The divine and admirable disciples of the apostles built up the superstructure of the churches, the foundations whereof the apostles had laid, in all places where they came; they everywhere prosecuted the preaching of the gospel, sowing the seeds of heavenly doctrine throughout the whole world.  Many of the disciples then alive distributed their estates to the poor; and, leaving their own country, did the work of evangelists to those who had never yet heard the Christian faith, preaching Christ, and delivering the evangelical writings to them.  No sooner had they planted the faith in any foreign countries, and ordained guides and pastors, to whom they committed the care of these new plantations, but they went to other nations, assisted by the grace and powerful working of the Holy Spirit.  As soon as they began to preach the gospel the people flocked universally to them, and cheerfully worshiped the true God, the Creator of the world, piously and heartily believing in his name” 55).

As for the dark ages, Spurgeon says, “As the dark ages lowered, the best preachers of the gradually declining church were also preachers in the open air; as were also those itinerant friars and great founders of religious orders who kept alive such piety as remained” (55).

As for Reformers before the Reformation, Spurgeon says, “When Antichrist had commenced its more universal sway, the Reformers before Reformation were full often open air preachers, as, for instance, Arnold of Brescia, who denounced Papal usurptions at the very gates of the Vatican” (56).

As for the Reformation, Spurgeon says, “I have no time for even a complete outline, but would simply ask you, where would the Reformation have been if its great preachers had confined themselves to churches and cathedrals?  How would the common people have become indoctrinated with the gospel had it not been for those far wandering evangelists, the colporteurs, and those daring innovators who found a pulpit on every heap of stones, and an audience chamber in every open space near the abodes of men?”

As for Whitefield and Wesley who were denied pulpits on many ocassions, and who did not receive support from some of their friends, Spurgeon says, “(Whitfield) As the scene was quite new, and I had just began to be an extempore preacher, it often occasioned many inward conflicts.  Sometimes, when twenty thousand people were before me, I had not, in my own apprehension, a word to say, either to God or them.  But I was never totally deserted, and frequently knew by happy experience what our Lord meant when he said, ‘Out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water.’  The open firmament above me, the prospect of the adjacent fields, with the sight of thousands and thousands, some in coaches, some on horseback, and some on the tress, and, at times, all affected and drenched in tears together, to which sometimes was added the solemnity of the approaching evening, was almost too much for, and quite overcame me” (68).

“Wesley writes in his journal, ‘Saturday, 31 [March, 1731].  In the evening I reached Bristol, and met Mr. Whitefield there.  I could scarce reconcile myself at first to this strange way of preaching in the fields, of which he set me an example on Sunday; having been all my life (till very lately) so tenacious of every point relating to decency and order, that I should have thought the saving of souls almost a sin, if had it not been done in a church.’  Such were the feelings of a man who in after life became one of the greatest open air preachers that ever lived!

I plan on doing a part two post on open-air preaching from Charles Spurgeon’s analysis.  Stay tuned.

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