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Posts Tagged ‘Genesis’

Gregory D. Cook. Living in the Gap Between Promise and Reality: The Gospel According to Abraham.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, January 16, 2015. 208 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster |Amazon

Are you reading the narratives in Genesis about the life of Abraham?  Also are you looking for a good devotional commentary that also have a redemptive historical awareness and also conscious of biblical theology?  This would be a resource in understanding the portion of the book of Genesis.

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A Christian asked what would be a biblical response to the following:

“To believe that Satan disguised himself as a snake in order to deceive mankind is to believe that Satan deceived God himself if God condemned snakes by cursing them to slither upon the dust of the earth without legs for a crime snakes never committed if, in fact, it was Satan disguised as one.”

Note there is a denial of the serpent being Satan in the narrative of the Fall in Genesis 3.

Here’s my response:

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For today’s post we will tackle the question the Skeptic Annotated Bible asked: Who was Noah’s youngest son?

Here are the answers which the skeptic believes indicate a Bible contradiction:

Ham

Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father, and told his two brothers outside. 23 But Shem and Japheth took a garment and laid it on both their shoulders and walked backward and covered the nakedness of their father; and their faces were turned away, so that they did not see their father’s nakedness. 24 When Noah awoke from his wine, he knew what his youngest son had done to him.” (Genesis 9:22-24)

Japheth

Now after Noah was five hundred years old, Noah fathered Shem, Ham, and Japheth.” (Genesis 5:32)

And Noah fathered three sons: Shem, Ham, and Japheth. (Genesis 6:10)

On this very same day Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah, and Noah’s wife and the three wives of his sons with them, entered the ark, ” (Genesis 7:13)

Now the sons of Noah who came out of the ark were Shem, Ham, and Japheth; and Ham was the father of Canaan.” (Genesis 9:18)

Now these are the records of the generations of the sons of Noah: Shem, Ham, and Japheth; and sons were born to them after the flood. (Genesis 10:1)

Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth.” (1 Chronicles 1:4)

(All Scriptural quotation comes from the New American Standard Bible)

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James Montgomery Boice. Genesis, volume 1: Genesis 1-11Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, May 1st 2006. 464 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

Are you studying through the book of Genesis and wish you can understand more of what you read?  A book that would be helpful is this title.  The book is an expository commentary, which is between a devotional and heavier exegetical Bible commentary. It was written by the late preacher James Montgomery Boice and covers first eleven chapters of Genesis.  Overall I enjoyed this and learned a lot of new things from the book of Genesis as the result of reading the Scripture in conjunction with this commentary as a learning tool.

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This is a book by one of our own WordPress blogger.

 

Steven Teske. Christ in Genesis.  North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, March 6, 2017. 120 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Does the book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible point us towards Christ?  Here in this book the author Steven Teske shows us how in the very first book of the Bible the Savior of sinners can be found in its pages.

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This is part 2 of our critique of Rachel Held Evans’ book titled Inspired.   For Part 1 click here.  Lord willing part 2 and 3 of our series will look at chapter 1 of the book which is on “Origin Stories.”

On page 9 Rachel Held Evans stated the following concerning the Bible’s origin story in the book of Genesis:

Origin stories are rarely straightforward history.  Over the years, they morph into a colorful amalgam of truth and myth, nostalgia and cautionary tale, the shades of their significance brought out by the particular light of a particular moment.

Contrary to what many of us are told, Israel’s origin stories weren’t designed to answer scientific, twenty-first-century questions about the beginning of the universe or the biological evolution of human beings, but rather were meant to answer then-pressing, ancient questions about the nature of God and God’s relationship to creation. Even the story of Adam and Eve, found in Genesis 2 and 3, is thought by many scholars to be less a story about human origins and more a story about Israel’s origins, a symbolic representation of Israel’s pattern of habitation, disobedience, and exile, set in primeval time.

In her own words Rachel Held Evans sees the Bible’s origin story to be in the same league with other origin stories.  And origin stories in her own words “are rarely straightforward history.”  As she later explained this means that Genesis 2-3 is “less a story about human origins and more a story about Israel’s origins.”  Evans therefore sees Genesis 2-3 as “a symbolic representation of Israel’s pattern.”

There’s so much to say with just these two paragraphs.  Here’s my response:

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Vern Poythress. Christian Interpretations of Genesis 1.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, September 20th, 2013. 32 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This is another work in the “Christian Answers to Hard Questions” series published by Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing.  Here the author Vern Poythress looks at how Christians should interpret the first chapter of Genesis.  Although the author is a New Testament professor I think Poythress is more than capable to write on this subject given his expertise in hermeneutics, linguistics, science and theology.

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Here’s a wonderful resource that’s worth bookmarking!  The Old Testament professor at The Master’s Seminary has taught in the past on the book of Genesis.  Fortunately for all of us his lectures are online for free!

Here are the videos:

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What is a man and a woman?

We just wrapped up this series of Bible study posts last week which explored seven truths derived from Genesis 1:26-28 concerning God’s creation of man and woman.  We were studying them so that we would understand God’s design of manhood and womanhood for our lives today.

Here are the posts to the seven truths:

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What is a man and a woman?

In this series we are exploring seven truths derived from Genesis 1:26-28 concerning God’s creation of man and woman so that we would understand God’s design of manhood and womanhood for our lives today.

Here’s the two previous three truths that we looked at:

  1. 7 Truths about God’s Creation of Man and Woman from Genesis 1: Point 1
  2. 7 Truths about God’s Creation of Man and Woman from Genesis 1: Point 2 & 3

In this post we will look at point 4 and 5.

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What is a man and a woman?

This series of posts we will see seven truths derived from Genesis 1:26-28 concerning God’s creation of man and woman so that we would understand God’s design of manhood and womanhood for our lives today.

Last time we saw Truth # 1: God created both men and female and God has the authority to say what man and woman is supposed to be.

In this post we will look at point 2 and 3.

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bassano_jacopo_garden_of_eden

The topic of the historicity of Adam as the first man is a hot topic today in theology since some Evangelicals have come out to deny the historicity of Adam. The following is an outline from a bigger series I have going through a Biblical view of man.  I hope the following is helpful to think about how various genre that is unquestionably literal found in the Bible interprets the meaning and genre of Genesis 1-3 literally.

Purpose: To consider the arguments for the historical Adam as the first man God created.

I. Special Creation of Adam and Eve according to Genesis 1-2

a. “Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; and let them rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over the cattle and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” (Genesis 1:26-31)

i.      This is the more general account of the creation of man, Genesis 2 will be more specific.

ii.      “Man” here is literally “Adam” in the Hebrew.

iii.      Notice here the plurality within God creating man

1. “Let Us make

2. “in Our image

3. “according to Our likeness

iv.      Notice the role of man in God’s creation in this verse.

b. “Then the Lord God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being.” (Genesis 2:7)

 i.      This account is more specific than Genesis 1.

 ii.      Again, “man” here is literally “Adam” in the Hebrew.

iii.      Two details of Adam’s creation

1. Formed from the ground

2. God breathed into his nostril

c. “The Lord God fashioned into a woman the rib which He had taken from the man, and brought her to the man.” (Genesis 2:22)

i.      This account is the creation of the first woman, later named Eve in Genesis 3:20.

ii.      Note Eve was made from Adam’s rib.

II.  There have been those who have questioned the historicity of the Bible’s account of the creation of man with Adam being the firstMan.  For example:

a. Tremper Longman III[1]

b. Bruce Waltke: From a headline of the news, “OT Professor Bruce Waltke resigns from RTS Orlando Faculty amid historical Adam and Eve controversy”[2]

c. Peter Enns: “Likewise, Israel’s story was written to say something about their place in the world and the God they worshiped. To think that the Israelites, alone among all other ancient peoples, were interested in (or capable of) giving some definitive, quasi-scientific, account of human origins is an absurd logic. And to read the story of Adam and Eve as if it were set up to so such a thing is simply wrongheaded.”[3]

III. Objections comes down to an issue of hermeneutics

a. In his book against the historical Adam, Peter Enns writes, “One cannot read Genesis literally—meaning as a literally accurate description of physical, historical reality—in view of the state of scientific knowledge today and our knowledge of ancient Near Eastern stories of origin.”[4]

b. The role of presupposing evolution in shaping interpretation of Genesis 1-3: “If evolution is true, one can no longer accept, in any true sense of the word ‘historical,’ the instantaneous and special creation of humanity described in Genesis, specifically 1:26-31 and 2:7, 22.”[5]

IV. Why we should interpret Genesis 1-2 and Adam literally and historically

a. Genre of Genesis 1-2 is narrative and hence it should be treated as revealing literal information.

i.      The essential elements of Hebrew narratives include[6]:

1. Scene

a. This is probably the most important element.

b. Scene involves sequence of event in the narrative.

c. In the Hebrew text, the component of scene can be established by the pattern of wayyiqtol.[7]

i.      Wayyiqtol is a syntactical construct of a conjunction (wow consecutive) + prefixed form/preterite/imperfect verb.

ii.      Wayyiqtol is often used to establish temporal or logical sequence.

2. Plot

This concerns the beginning, middle and ending of the development of the narrative.

3. Character

Who is involved in the narrative?

4. Setting

Where in space/time does this narrative takes place?

5. Point of view

ii.      Genesis 1-2 has the element of the literary form of narrative

1. Scene:

a. Sequences of days (Genesis 1), Creation of AdamàGod’s dialogueàCreation of Eve (Genesis 2)

b. Genesis 1-2 has many Wayyiqtol is a syntactical construct of a conjunction (wow consecutive) + prefixed form/preterite/imperfect verb.

2. Plot: Five days of creation then the creation of man on the sixth day and then rest (Genesis 1); Lonliness of Adam then creation of Eve (Genesis 2)

3. Character: God, Adam and Eve.

4. Setting: The newly created world (Genesis 1), Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:10-14)

5. Point of view: God’s point of view of creation chronologically (Genesis 1), God’s point of view of creation of man specifically (Genesis 2)

b. How does the rest of the Bible interpret Genesis 1-2?

i.      Methodological consideration

1. Since some say that Genesis 1-2 was originally not intended to be interpreted literally, that it’s meant to be understood as symbolic, so we have to ask the question of how the rest of the Bible interpret Genesis 1-2.

2. If the rest of the Bible as God’s infallible Word interpret Genesis 1-2 literally such as believing in a literal Adam and Eve, then we ought to see this data as God’s perspective on Genesis 1-2 and purpose of writing it is literal.

 ii.      Within Genesis

1. Note: Adam and Evil is presuppose as historical lest the rest of Genesis becomes nonsensical.

2. Narrative of the fall in Genesis 3 presupposes a literal Adam and Eve.

3. Those that have children are real, historically existent people.  Adam and Eve had children and therefore historically existed.

a. Adam and Eve is described as having children such as Cain and Abel (Genesis 4:1-2).

b. Adam described in a genealogy (Genesis 4:25, 5:1)

iii.      Book of Job: “Have I covered my transgressions like Adam, By hiding my iniquity in my bosom,” (Job 31:33)

At a minimum, this presupposes the story of Genesis 3 and a reference to Adam.

 iv.      Book of Hosea: “But like Adam they have transgressed the covenant; There they have dealt treacherously against Me.” (Hosea 6:7)

1. Here the sin of God’s people are compared to Adam’s sin.

2. Only a real person can transgress a covenant.

v.      Genealogies: 1 Chronicles 1:1, Luke 3:38.

1. Genealogy as a literally form is meant to refer to real people.

2. Adam is referred to in genealogies and therefore God’s Word is here attesting to the fact that Adam was historical.

vi.      Reinforcing the historicity of genealogies, Jude 14 as a straight forward epistle indicating God’s own Word interpreted genealogies literally.

vii.      Both Adam and Eve are presupposed as real in 1 Timothy 2:13-14.

1. Paul could have just invoked his apostolic authority concerning how women ought to behave.

2. The event of the fall of Adam and Eve is invoked here as the basis for Paul’s admonition.

viii.      Paul’s preaching of the Gospel to Athenian philosophers presupposes Adam as the father of all: “and He made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined their appointed times and the boundaries of their habitation,” (Acts17:26)

1. Note that the Greeks did not believe God made all man from one person.

2. They believe that their own race (Greeks) had nothing to do with others since they were far more superior.

3. Yet Acts 17 is Paul’s sermon that lays the foundation to make the Gospel intelligible and he found it important to bring up Adam as the first man of all.

 ix.      Adam is presuppose as historical figure in the underpinning of the Gospel.

1. Just as Christ was historical and imputed righteousness for justification so too was Adam presupposed as historical imputing sin (Romans 5:12-21).

2. Just as Christ was historical and gave us life so too was Adam presupposed as historical giving us death (1 Corinthians 15:20-58).


[4] Peter Enns, The Evolution of Adam, (Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2012), 137.

[5] Peter Enns, The Evolution of Adam, (Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2012), xiv.

[6] The following essential elements are found in Walter C. Kaiser, Jr., “Narrative”, Cracking Old Testament Codes, (Nashville: Broadman and Holman Publishers, 1995), 69-76.

[7] The discussion about the wayyiqtol is from Robert B. Chisholm Jr., From Exegesis to Exposition, (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1999), 119-120.

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William Barrick

Central Seminary recently asked Old Testament professor Dr. William Barrick to speak for their MacDonald Lecture series on the topic of Biblical creationism and Biblical authority.

These are hot topics today during a time where people attack the subject of Biblical creation, the historicity of Adam and the hermeneutics of Genesis.

Listen to them, follow along with the PDF document, enjoy it and be equipped!

General Sessions

Creation Outside Genesis   PDF

The Historicity of Adam    PDF

The Problem of Death       PDF

The Creation Record: Is It Poetry?     PDF

Question and Answer Sessions

Monday Q & A

Tuesday Q & A

UPDATE: To have this save on your device as a podcast, click HERE.

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