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Posts Tagged ‘Heaven’

For today’s post we will tackle another question from the Skeptic Annotated Bible: When was heaven created?

Here are the two answers which the skeptic believes shows a Bible contradiction:

When the earth was created.

Then the King will say to those on His right, ‘Come, you who are blessed of My Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.” (Matthew 25:34)

Sometime after the ascension of Jesus.

“In My Father’s house are many dwelling places; if it were not so, I would have told you; for I go to prepare a place for you.” (John 14:2)

(All Scriptural quotation comes from the New American Standard Bible)

Here’s a closer look at whether or not there is a contradiction:

(more…)

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Heaven

Smith, Colin S. Heaven, How I Got Here: The Story of the Thief on the Cross. Fearn, Ross-shire: Christian Focus,     2015.

This book which is 95 pages is packed with ancient Gospel truth, but done in a fresh imaginative and dramatic writing style that does not compromise the veracity and integrity of the Gospel.  The author skillfully brings together sound doctrine, powerful theological accounts of the cross, and  historical accuracy concerning the drama of this account concerning the thief and Jesus Christ.  Here imagination is used properly for the glory of God.

The book covers different scenes that are categorized this way: breakfast, hatred, faith, hope, love, darkness, agony, triumph, and safety.  The main protagonist is the thief at the cross.  His thoughts, feelings, and volition gushes forth from this book.  The account of the thief’s thoughts although imaginative, except for his few words as recorded in Scripture, are sound words that echo Gospel centered truths of how a sinner maybe saved.  I have never witnessed a book that has approach the thief’s account in this manner.

Besides the profound imaginative features, what I found refreshing are some of the precise and deep-seated truths of the Gospel that emphasize the grace of God, the holiness of God, the justice of God, the sinfulness of man, and the intense reminder that the gates of Hell and Heaven are only inches away from us.  I don’t want to give out too much details about this book.  I recommend buying it and reading it.  It is a great book for an unbeliever who needs the Gospel and for believers who need a profound and refresh way of explaining the Gospel to sinners who are in danger of judgment and in desperate need of forgiveness.

Thief at the cross, “I endured the pains of crucifixion, but I did not experience the agonies of hell.  Jesus endured them for me, so that I would never know what they are like.  The more I think about this, the more staggering it gets” (71).

NOTE: I received this book for free from the publisher Christian Focus Publications through Cross Focused Reviews in exchange for my honest opinion. The thoughts and words are my own and I was under no obligation to provide a favorable review.

Purchase bookCFP or Amazon

 

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The interviewer does a good job pressing on issues that Rob Bell is evasive on. Has American clergymen become like politicians with their double talk?

One of Steve Hays satire from Triablogue,

Bashir: You ate your mother for breakfast. That’s true, isn’t it?
Bell: I begin with the belief that when we eat our mother, God eats our mother. I begin with a divine being who is profoundly empathetic, compassionate and stands in solidarity with cannibals.
Bashir: I get that. But did you eat your mother for breakfast?
Bell: Eating your mother for breakfast is one culinary perspective within the stream of Christian cannibalism. There’s been within the Christian tradition a number of people who eat their mother for breakfast, but others eat her for lunch, or save her for dinner. Then there’s postmortem cannibalism. One of the things in the book I’m clear on and want people to see is that this tradition has all of these different opinions on the right time to eat your mother.
Bashir: So did you eat or not?
Bell: It’s a beautiful hope. We ought to keep that front and center.
Bashir: You’re trying to have it both ways. That doesn’t make sense. Yes or no: did you or didn’t you eat your mother for breakfast?
Bell: I think that’s a paradox at the heart of Christian cannibalism.

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