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Posts Tagged ‘world war two’

A weekend non-fiction reading review!  Something timely in light of V-J (Victory over Japan) day yesterday!

Jack “Dusty” Kleiss.  Never Call Me a Hero: A Legendary American Dive-Bomber Pilot Remembers the Battle of Midway. New York, NY: William Morrow, May 23rd 2017. 312 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

What is it like to hear the account of a pilot who made history in World War Two?  This book gives us a taste.  The author N. Jack “Dusty” Kleiss was a naval pilot who fought in the battle of Midway.  Midway was the naval battle that changed the direction of the war and the tide was turned against Japan.    Kleiss didn’t just take part of the battle; he was one of those pilots who actually successfully bombed Japanese ships and carrier and directly contributed to the strategic defeat of Japan.  This is his story and the story of the men he served with.

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A weekend leisure reading review…because sometimes Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading!

Winston Groom. The Generals: Patton, MacArthur, Marshall, and the Winning of World War II.  Washington D.C.: National Geographic, November 10th 2015. 512 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This was an enjoyable book on three important US Army Generals during World War Two.  The three men are General George S. Patton, Douglas MacArthur, and George Marshall.  Together these men played an important role for the victory of World War Two both in the Pacific and in Europe.  If you want to learn about all three men in one volume this would be it and though it is over five hundred pages I still think it is reasonable if one consider how long three separate volumes on each of these men would be, given how much they have accomplished and how important they were in the war.

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A belated weekend leisure reading review since I taught a lot more extra this weekend and didn’t get around to writing and posting this. Why a leisure reading review on a blog on the Bible, theology and apologetics?  Because Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading…

Vincent Brugeass.  The Regiment: The True Story of the SAS Volume 1. Paris, France: Europe Comics, November 21st 2018. 67 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is a comic that tells the story of the early days in the most famous Special Forces unit in the world: The British Special Air Services.  I have been fascinated with the Special Air Services (SAS) ever since I was a kid reading military history and seeing pictures of the famous counter-terrorism mission of storming the Iranian embassy in London when it was taken over by terrorists.  This comic book is about the SAS origin’s in the North African desert during World War Two.  The work was originally in French but was translated into English by the publisher.

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This weekend was a flurry of ministry activity.  Finally got time to sit down and write this review…because sometimes even Pastors need a break from heavy theological reading!  Also thanks to Pacific Paratrooper whose post was what prompted me to read this book!

Hiromichi Yahara. The Battle for Okinawa.  New York, NY: John Wiley & Son, Inc., January 1st 2002. 272 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is a rather unique book on World War Two Pacific campaign since it is written by a higher up military officer in the Japanese Imperial Army.  The author Colonel Hiromichi Yahara is the strategic mind behind the battle of Okinawa and his book is largely his account of that battle from the perspective of a senior staff officer for the leading generals of the Okinawa’s defense.  Yahara is actually the strategist behind much (not all as readers will learn) of Japanese Army’s fight against the American forces.  I think this book is quite unique given that there’s few books from the perspective of the Japanese side and also even further rare since he’s a higher level officer that survived the war in a conflict that often witness Japanese officers commit suicide or engage in final futile suicidal attacks on the enemies.

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A nonfiction leisure weekend reading review!  Because Pastors and apologists also need a break from heavy reading!

 

Sam Kleiner.  The Flying Tigers. New York, NY: Viking, May 15th, 2018. 304 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is the story of a military aviation volunteer group comprising mostly of Americans that fought against the Japanese in China during the 1940s.  I have heard of the Flying Tigers for many years but know so little about them until I got a hold of this book.  What prompted to read this book was the result of reading a previous book on China and America titled The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom.  That book talked about the Flying Tigers and their commander Claire Chennault and although it was too brief the reference to the Flying Tigers that book made me want to find a longer discussion of the famous fighter outfit.  I’m glad I read this book.

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I’m going to post this ahead of the Memorial Day weekend as a book I immensely enjoyed that is very appropriate for the weekend as part of my nonfiction leisure reading review…why?  Because Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading…and also to appreciate the generations of people who have served in the past in the military and have given so much.

Chester Nez.  Code Talker: The First and Only Memoir By One of the Original Navajo Code Talkers of WWII. New York, NY: Berkley Caliber, September 6th 2011. 310 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is an incredible book on the legendary Navajo Native American who served in the United States Marines during World War Two.  Apparently this is the only memoir of the original first group of Navajo “Code talkers.”  The book is about the life and service of “Code Talker” Chester Nez who co-authored it along with Judith Avila, a historian of these incredible Marines.  In the beginning of the book Avila noted that at first Chester Nez was reluctant to write this book since he felt that others also have done their duty and also because he feared people would not find his life interesting.  Avila disagreed and encouraged him to tell his story.  I’m in agreement with Avila; Chester Nez and other “Code Talkers” lived an interesting life both in the Marine Corps and outside the Marine Corps.  I’m really glad this book was written.

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A weekend nonfiction book review…because sometimes even Pastors need a break from heavy theological reading.

Mitchell Zuckoff.  Lost in Shangri-la. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers, April 26th 2011. 384 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

The subtitle of the book describes this work as “A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II.”  At first I didn’t know what to make of this book as it wasn’t your typical story of survival and rescue of American servicemembers in World War 2.  But as I progressed reading the book it got more and more interesting.

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