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Posts Tagged ‘Biblical Theology’

 

G.K. Beale. Redemptive Reversals and the Ironic Overturning of Human Wisdom. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, October 17, 2019.  208 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

Do you appreciate irony?  I love ironies and if there’s one literature that really got me interested in this literary device it was the Bible.  In this book New Testament scholar G. K. Beale look at the various irony found throughout the Bible from Genesis to Revelation.  This is an excellent work on Biblical Theology and certainly I want to read more of Beale’s books.

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Barry G. Webb.  Five Festal Garments.  Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, March 26th, 2001.  151 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This book is on a Christian examination of five books in the Old Testament that are most neglected in the Bible: The Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes and Esther.  If you want to learn more about these five books and gain rich insights on them then this volume is worth getting.  This work is a part of the New Studies in Biblical Theology series edited by D.A. Carson.  Personally it was the second title in the series that I read which I looked forward to with much anticipation since the first book I read Adopted into God’s Family left a strong impression.  Five Festal Garments didn’t disappoint.  In fact it exceeded my expectation!

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Guy P. Waters. The Lord’s Supper as the Sign and Meal of the New Covenant.  Wheaton, IL: Crossway, January 31st 2019.  128 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This is the sixth book I read from the “Short Studies in Biblical Theology” series published by Crossway.  I have immensely enjoyed the other five volumes that I read from this series and this work is no different.  This particular work explores the Lord’s Supper.

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Sidney Greidanus. From Chaos to Cosmos: Creation to New Creation.  Wheaton, IL: Crossway, October 31st 2018.  244 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This is the fifth book I read from the “Short Studies in Biblical Theology” series published by Crossway.  This series is a wonderful introduction for the layman on biblical theology in which one see the content of God’s truth being taught according to the consideration of the flow of Scripture as it progressed in redemptive history.  I have immensely enjoyed the other four volumes.  I also enjoyed this particular volume.  This present work explores the theme of chaos to cosmos starting with the first chapter of Genesis and ending with the last chapter Revelation.  This is a theme that is literally from the first page to the last page of the Bible and yet it is not often as obvious or noted by preachers and teachers today so this book is definitely helpful.

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In another internet forum someone asked the hypothetical question of “What three Biblical books best encapsulates the message of the Bible?”

Now of course we can’t make the all the books in the Bible forced into three books; there’s a sense we can do injustice to the richness of God’s revelations in terms of each book being a masterpiece of literature, doctrinal gold, etc.  But I thought it was still good exercise since it makes me think about what three books I should eventually preach and teach through as a Pastor over the course of decades of ministry in order to best capture the main thrust of all of Scripture.

Here’s my answer which was expanded from my original comment:

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Desmond Alexander. The City of God and the Goal of Creation. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, January 31st 2018.  190 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This is the third book I read from the “Short Studies in Biblical Theology” series published by Crossway.  I have immensely enjoyed the other two volumes that I read from this series (see Review: Work and Our Labor in the Lord and Review: Marriage and the Mystery of the Gospel) and this work is no different.  This present work explores the theme of “the city of God” in the Bible, namely Jerusalem but it also explores the city of God in light of its antithesis: The City of Man, namely Babylon.  This is an excellent work on a biblical theology that gives us a biblical “tale of two cities” stretching from Genesis to Revelation that is at once exciting, edifying and relevant since these two cities are capitals of two groups of people in this world with one under God and the other in rebellion against God.  If you think you know the Word of God and yet you are unable to see a unifying theme from Genesis to Revelation in the Bible you would find this book very helpful.  Even for readers who have a deeper grasp of biblical theology would enjoy this work.

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Dr. Thomas Schreiner is a New Testament professor at Southern Seminary.  My favorite work by Schreiner thus far has been his “Faith Alone: The Doctrine of Justification.”

Earlier this month Schreiner has lectured a series of lectures surveying the books of the Bible.  The Master’s Seminary has made them available online on Youtube.  I’m halfway through them myself.  Here are the lectures below:

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Here is a limited time giveaway that will expire September 16, 2017.  Top Christian Books is giving away all forty volume of the New Studies and Biblical Studies series.  I’ve really appreciated the few works in the series that I have used mainly for its work of scholarship on the Bible.

You can enter in the chance for a giveaway by clicking HERE.

My favorite of the forty is the one titled Adopted into God’s Family by Trevor Burke.

For the list of 40 volumes check out the publisher’s page on this series here.

I know this sounds weird but I’m actually praying I get this set!

Again you can enter in the chance for a giveaway by clicking HERE.

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Raymond C. Ortlund Jr. Marriage & the Mystery of the Gospel.  Wheaton, IL: Crossway, October 31, 2016.  128 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

This is a great book on a biblical theology of marriage.  It is part of Crossway’s Short Studies in Biblical Theology Series.  So far in this series this is my favorite work thus far.  Don’t let the size of this book fool you; it is packed with a lot of insightful gems from Scripture in each page.  I actually spent a longer time reading this book as I was taking notes than some books on marriages that has more pages than this work.  The publisher Crossway definitely picked the right guy to write this volume since the author Raymond Ortlund has previously written an excellent chapter exegetically examining what Genesis has to teach us about marriage for the massive work Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood.  If you want a beautiful portrait of what a biblical view of marriage is, in its sacredness and dignity, get this book.

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prophet-priest-and-king-richard-belcher

Richard P Belcher. Prophet, Priest, and King: The Roles of Christ in the Bible and Our Roles Today.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, September 30th, 2016. 224 pp.

5 out of 5

While the theme of Christ being Prophet, Priest and King has been much discussed in systematic theology the author made a good point that there hasn’t been the exploration of these motifs through the discipline of biblical theology; that is, there has not been the exploration of these offices’ as it developed through the unfolding of redemptive history that eventually anticipate and find its fulfillment in Christ.  This book is an attempt to fill in the gap.  I think the book accomplishes its aim of fulfilling this need.  The author was able to do this in such a way that was spiritually enriching, practical and gives readers a greater appreciation for the wisdom of God found in the Scriptures.

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What is Biblical Theology

NOTE: This book was provided to me free by Crossway Publishing and Net Galley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.

Here is an introductory text to the subject of Biblical theology by a professor who teaches it at Southern Seminary.  Some might ask what Biblical theology is and secondly, why is it important.

The author James Hamilton define biblical theology as “the interpretive perspective reflected in the way the biblical authors have presented their understanding of earlier Scripture, redemptive history, and the events they are describing, recounting, celebrating, or addressing in narratives, poems, proverbs, letters, and apocalypses.”  As Hamilton further explain the meaning of biblical theology he notes that biblical theology is the biblical worldview.  Those familiar with worldview and apologetics should thus start seeing its importance for the believer.

The opening page of the book beautifully makes the point of why biblical theology is vital, with the author recounting the passing away of a friend who knew the Lord.  It is a reminder that what we believe is an issue of heaven and hell and thus to know what the Bible really is about and the content of the biblical worldview is something practical and significant for life now—and for eternity.

The book is divided into three parts with the first covering the Scriptures’ “big story” that essentially capture the Bible’s one main idea.  The second part of the book looks at the symbols throughout the Bible and how they contribute in our understanding of God’s main story.  The third part of the book focuses on the church and how believers fit into the meta-narrative of Scripture.

If you know your Scripture well, part one of the book should be nothing new.  However, even if you think you are familiar with the Bible, one can still spiritually benefit from this portion of the book, since we always profit from being in God’s Word and being reminded of the Gospel.  I enjoyed the second part of the book the most, which explores “patterns,” “types,” and other symbols in the Scripture.  Here Hamilton gives plenty of types that point to the Messianic hope of the person and work of Jesus Christ.  One example that stood out to me was how the author interpreted Exodus 12:46 of the Lamb during the Exodus not to be broken, in light of Psalm 34:20 that later point towards Christ’s crucifixion.  Somehow I never saw the connection of it before even though it was before my very eyes!  I appreciated part three of the book which I saw was the author’s attempt to answer the existential question at the end of the day, “What does biblical theology have to do with me?”  If we as believers are the church, and the Bible uses various motifs and symbol to describe the church, then biblical theology tells us who we are in Christ, what our identity is, etc.

Contrary to what some may think, biblical theology as a discipline is not “right theology” in the sense that other theology or method of theology is automatically “unbiblical.”  I appreciate the author making it clear in the book that biblical theology is not opposed to systematic theology; that to engage in Biblical theology is not automatically “biblical” nor is systematic theology inherently “unbiblical.”  Here I wish Hamilton could have gone on to explore more of the possible rich relationship between systematic theology and biblical theology.  In my own life, as the result of my exposure to biblical theology it has shaped the way I teach and present systematic theology so that I’m not just “proof-texting” out of the Bible to prove a doctrine.  I now make it a point to note the flow of Scripture and how a particular verse’s redemptive historical context help demonstrate the doctrine in question and also develops the doctrine as Scripture progresses.

Purchase: Westminster | Amazon

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