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Archive for the ‘Book Review’ Category

Undemocratic Jay Sekulow

Jay Sekulow. Undemocratic: How Unelected, Unaccountable Bureaucrats Are Stealing Your Liberty and Freedom.   Brentwood, Tennessee: Howard Books, May 19th, 2015. 289 pp.

This book is about the problem with the bureaucracy of the Federal Government and how unaccountable that have become in today’s government.  The book is written by Jay Sekulow who is probably best known to most people for his radio show “Jay Sekulow Live!” and as the Chief Counsel with the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ, not to be confused with the ACLU).  In this book he documents the frightening abuse and mismanagement of bureaucrats who sets their own agenda contrary to the other three branch of government and the will of the American people.

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For your Spurgeon fixing…

The Blood of the Lamb the conquering weapon

Charles H. Spurgeon. Blood of the Lamb : The Conquering Weapon.  Pensacola, FL: Chapel Library, September 11th, 2014. 23 pp.

This is an adaptation from an 1888 sermon by the famous preacher Charles Spurgeon.  Spurgeon’s message is based upon Revelation 12:11.  This sermon is about how the blood of Jesus Christ is the believers’ spiritual weapon.  This booklet is broken down into two points with the first being what this conquering weapon is and the second point being how to apply the blood of Christ in one’s spiritual battle with Satan.  The second part was practical while the first point pretty much is driven by the truth of the Gospel of what Christ has done through His blood.  I found this to be an edifying read and used this to read with another brother together.  I believe others will find this to be edifying as well.

Chapel Library has this work for free in various electronic format if you click HERE.

If you really want to purchase this for your Kindle Device through Amazon for a cheap cost, click HERE.

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Music by Timothy Steele

Timothy H. Steele. Music.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, May 31st, 2016. 39 pp.

This is a booklet on a Christian worldview of the academic discipline of Chemistry that is part of the Faithful Learning Series published by Presbyterian and Reformed that provides an introductory look at various academic discipline from the perspective of the Christian worldview.  This particular work looks at the subject of the study of music and it is the fourth book I have read in this series.  Overall I am enjoying the series very much.

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As usual each Friday I try to post a review of weekend readings that pastors and others can read that serves as break from their spiritual readings.  Tonight’s book was one that was a great exercise of other parts of my mind.

The Insurgents David Petraeus by Fred Kaplan

Fred Kaplan. The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War.  New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, January 2nd, 2013. 432 pp.

What an amazing book.  I have so many good things to say.  But first a brief summary:  The author Fred Kaplan takes a look at the US Army’s wrestling with the idea and practice of counterinsurgency after the post-Vietnam era.  Kaplan makes the point that after the Vietnam War the leadership at the Pentagon never wanted to fight another counterinsurgency again.  Instead the military as a whole focused on the more traditional concept of warfare such as big tank battles, heavy artillery and mechanized heavy infantry.  A lot of this was due to the ongoing Cold War with the threat of Russia and the Eastern Bloc.  It was also what was most familiar to many of the Generals and Admirals.  But the collapse of the Soviet Union and the defeat of the fourth largest tank army during Desert Storm soon reduced the likelihood of the traditional warfare that the US wanted.  Unfortunately after Vietnam the Army has stopped thinking, teaching and training for counter-insurgency.  It didn’t even have a manual for that kind of warfare among its publications!  This book focuses primarily on how this mentality hurt the US military and also on the men and women who tried to change the Army’s way of fighting war.  It concentrate largely on the war in Iraq though it does give a brief look at Afghanistan.  Having recently read a number of books on military history I must say this book was one of the best military history nonfiction I read in the first half of 2016.

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God’s Way of Peace by Horatius Bonar

Horatius Bonar. God’s Way of Peace.   Nisyros Publishers, September 20, 2014. 66 pp.

Horatius Bonar’s book is wonderful.  I was hooked even with the preface that talks about how some pursue religion and religious activities because they have to, but inside they have no peace.  Hence the title of this book, which Bonar explains from the Scripture God’s way of peace.

The first two chapters did an excellent job showing that our own efforts and works righteousness to self-justify ourselves with our own merits does not work in achieving peace from God.  It was very well argued.  I thought it was powerful to read Bonar’s point that if we trust in our works for justification, we actually don’t get any closer to assurance.  Rather instead of trusting in our works, Bonar in chapter three argues that we need to trust in God’s attributes, and Bonar states it so beautifully how God’s attributes are amazing and lovely.  For instance, God wishes and predestined sinners to come to salvation but yet does so in a way that beckons onwards towards him.

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Here’s tonight’s recommended light reading.  Because ministers sometimes need a break from theology.

Daredevil Yellow Loeb

Jeph Loeb. Daredevil: Yellow.  New York, NY: Marvel Publishing Incorporated, December 17th, 2008. 168 pp.

This is my first time reading about the superhero known as Daredevil and I enjoyed it.  What prompted me to read this work is because of the name of the writer and the artist whom I enjoyed seeing their previous works on Batman.  I really like the storytelling ability of author Jeph Loeb and also the artistic presentation of Tim Sale whose drawing and colors are believable compared to some comics about superheroes while he also masterfully gives us colors and facial expression of character that is complex and beautifully gives us an overall noir-like vibe.

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Chemistry Daniel Zuidema

Daniel R. Zuidema. Chemistry.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, May 31st, 2016. 48 pp.

This is a booklet on a Christian worldview of the academic discipline of Chemistry that is part of the Faithful Learning Series published by Presbyterian and Reformed that provides an introductory look at various academic discipline from the perspective of the Christian worldview.  This is the third book I’m reading in this series and I’m really enjoying this series.

In this particular book the author looks at the field of Chemistry theologically by utilizing the paradigm of Creation, Fall and Redemption.  Beginning with creation, the author argues that Chemistry is one way we mirror the glory of God, in coming to understand and utilizing God created chemical processes.  I appreciate how under the section of “Creation” the author argues that chemicals are not in of itself evil, but it is the use of it that can be used for evil.  He gives us examples of things that we might thing as bad can at times have functions that are not evil.  It is a good reminder that we must not be dualists who are against what is physical as Christians.  Since I do not have a degree in Chemistry I appreciated the author breaking down for us the various courses in Chemistry such as organic, physical, analytical, biological, etc.

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