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Archive for the ‘Book Review’ Category

Brandon D. Crowe. Was Jesus Really Born of a Virgin?  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, August 16th, 2013. 32 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This booklet is part of the series “Christian Answers to Hard Questions” published by Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing.  As the title for this particular work suggests this booklet looks at the question “Was Jesus Really Born of a Virgin?”  The author Brandon D. Crowe who presently serves as an Associate Professor of New Testament at Westminster Theological Seminary.  Crowe has written this helpful resource that is accessible for the layman.

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Jared Kennedy.  The Beginner’s Gospel Story Bible.  Greensboro, NC: New Growth Press, November 13th, 2017. 272 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

My kids and I really enjoyed this book.  As the title and the cover of the book suggests this is a book with Bible stories for little children and is meant for kids between the age range of three to seven which is exactly the age range of my children.

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A Veteran’s Day weekend book review.

James Wright. Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War.  New York, NY: Thomas Dunne Books, April 4, 2017. 464 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

I read this book as a son of a refugee of the Vietnam War and also a Marine veteran of post-Vietnam military conflict.  Although I have read some individual biographies and accounts of the Vietnam War this is probably the first work I read in which looks at the bigger picture of the conflict such as evaluating the generation that fought in Vietnam, an evaluation of the political landscape and decisions of policy makers, the anti-war sentiments and the experiences of the guys doing combat operations.  The author James Wright did a good job of weaving veteran’s stories, statistics, and social discussions and offered to the readers a larger picture of the political narrative.  Being an academic historian, former Marine officer and an avid advocates for veterans puts him in a unique place to write this work.

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Some of you know that I’m a former Marine.  Since today is the Marine Corps Birthday I thought it is appropriate to share my weekend review of a story involving an incredible Marine that is part of the Marine Corps cherished heritage.

John Grider Miller. The Bridge At Dong Ha.  Annapolis, Maryland: U.S. Naval Institute Press, March 15th 1989. 224 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This book tells the story of the Marine legend John W. Ripley.  I have heard the name “Ripley” before as a Marine, and some vague summary of him blowing up a bridge to stop invading North Vietnamese communist forces during the last years of the Vietnam War.  Recently I saw something on facebook about Ripley that sparked my interests to read more about Ripley and this book was what I picked up to learn more about Ripley and the famous incident with the bridge at Dong Ha.  It was a treat for me to read this book.  I was blown away (pun intended) with what Ripley accomplished against overwhelming odds.  His story is one of courage, commitment and mission above self.

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Shona Murray and David P. Murray. Refresh: Embracing a Grace-Paced Life in a World of Endless Demands.  Wheaton, IL: Crossway, October 31, 2017.  208 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

In a world in which people have been overly busy and emotionally and physically burned out both author David Murray and his wife Shona Murray has written a helpful Christian book to address the problem.  This book provides preventive measures with practical wisdom and also spiritual resources from the Christian faith to deal with the issue.  The book’s main purpose is to teach readers what does a grace pace life looks like. Early in the book it points out that we need five “wells” of God’s grace: motivating grace, moderating grace, multiplying grace, releasing grace and receiving grace.  The rest of the book unpack what these five aspect of God’s grace means.  I got this book largely because I have benefited from the teaching ministry of David Murray and his practical insights which have been helpful from some of the online audios and lectures I have listened to.  This book I read lived up to my expectation.

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I’m going to have a part 2 of reviews of comic books and graphic novels that are historical fiction in its genre that I read this year, 2017 since I take a long time to write up all the reviews as oppose to just reading them.  For now here are the following reviews as part of this weekend’s light reading weekend reviews…because Pastors also need a break from heavy theological reading.

Brian Wood. Rebels: A Well-Regulated Militia.  Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics, May 4th 2016. 262 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This volume collects a series of graphic novel stories about the American War of Independence.  The idea of a comic series on the War of Independence fascinates me as someone who loves to read history; and the beautiful artwork for the cover sealed it for me that this worth picking up.  While one shouldn’t judge a book by its cover nevertheless in this instance the artwork with the cover was a tastes of things to come.

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Benjamin Reaoch. Women, Slaves, and the Gender Debate : a Complementarian Response to the Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, August 17th 2012. 193 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

Christian theologian John Frame once said that “The discussion of the man-woman relationship has greatly intensified since the 1970s.”  I think Frame is right.  Much discussion has been ongoing and many books have been written on the topic.  Different movements have also arise over the decades.  One such movement focuses more on the hermeneutics of how we approach the Scriptures and how we interpret passages concerning the relationship of man and woman.  It is called the redemptive-movement with William Webb being the notable leader of the group.  While different people affiliated with this movement may differ in some of their conclusion nevertheless we can safely say that their hermeneutics lead them to the conclusion of egalitarianism.  This is a book length critique of the movement from a Complementarian perspective.

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