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Archive for the ‘Book Review’ Category

Jerry Bridges.  Transforming Grace: Living Confidently in God’s Unfailing Love.  Colorado Springs, CO: NavPress, April 22nd, 2008. 266 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

Over the last few years my appreciation for the writings of Jerry Bridges has increased.  His works have been tremendously edifying and encouraging for me to walk in grace in the Christian life.  This book is another of Bridges’ writings that immensely blessed me spiritually.

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Someone was asking me about this book and I thought I had a review of this work on the blog but somehow I haven’t posted it!

Richard Pratt. Every Thought Captive.  Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, August 1st 1979. 142 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Westminster Amazon

This book was written by Richard Pratt, the Old Testament professor out at Reformed Theological Seminary. Quite the well rounded professor, he wrote this work when he was much younger, for the purpose of training young Christians (high school age) in the defense of the Faith from a Van Tillian perspective. I appreciated Pratt’s effort of communicating Van Til’s school of apologetics in non-technical language. The thirteen lessons are perfect for sunday school material, and each lesson ends with several discussion questions. The book also has various drawings as visual aids, a plus for those who learn visually. The book also manage to critique popular non-Presuppositional apologetics in lesson nine, where Pratt provided a general yet gracious critique of Paul E. Little’s popular, “Why I Believe”. But the gist of the book was positive construction of the framework to engage in apologetics. The core of his apologetics methodology applied is found in lesson 11-13, and much of his attention is on the certainty-uncertainty dialectic found in the autonomous (what Pratt calls ‘independent’) man. The book close with an illustration of a hypothethical scenario of apologetics applied.

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This came out yesterday and is currently #1 Best Seller in DC Comics & Graphic Novels (and rightly so!)

Frank Miller.  Batman: The Dark Knight: Master Race. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, September 19th, 2017. 376 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Wow this work is just incredible.  This is definitely the best work on Batman released by DC for the year 2017; I think it would be up there with some of the best works on Batman.  This is the third volume in the famous Dark Knight Saga by Frank Miller, with the first one titled The Dark Knight Return and the second titled The Dark Knight Strikes Again.  With the release of Batman: The Dark Knight: Master Race it has been thirty one years since the first one began.  That’s thirty one year since Frank Miller wrote a story that has shaped Batman’s narrative and also have influenced the movies about Batman.  This third work is epic in the same fashion as The Dark Knight Return.

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I got to say thank you to fellow blogger Michael Coughlin who got me this back earlier this year as a gift.  I was immensely blessed by the book.  Now he will notice how slow I read each book.

Nate Pickowicz. Reviving New England.  Self-published.  Charleston, SC: CreateSpace, October 8th 2016. 140 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

I enjoyed this book.  I have heard of the author through Twitter; many believers I respect interact with him and retweet what he has to say.  Nate Pickowicz is a church planter and pastor of Harvest Bible Church in the New England area, specifically New Hampshire so as one who is in the trenches he’s quite qualified to write a book on reviving New England.

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A weekend non-theological book review.  Cause Pastors also need a break with other readings…

Robert M. Gates. Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War.  New York, NY: Knopf, January 14th 2014. 640 pp.

5 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Let me begin by saying I rarely pick up memoirs and of those I have started very few I have ever finished.  A lot of them end up being somewhat anti-climatic and sometimes they can be too narcissistic for my taste.  Often in the back of my mind I wonder if there are things left out or opinions given that end up being more of a hindrance to knowing the truth.  So the fact that I finished this memoir and am writing a review of this book speaks volume of how much I enjoyed this work.

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Scott Snyder.  All-Star Batman, Volume 2: Ends of the Earth. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, September 12th, 2017. 144 pp.

3 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

This is volume two of “All-Star Batman” that is a part of DC Comics’ recent “rebirth” reboot.  I wanted to read this graphic novel largely due to the fact that Scott Snyder wrote the story.  Snyder’s previous stories has been good and I’m especially impressed with his Court of Owls.  I must admit though I wasn’t as impressed with this particular volume as I have been with other works by Snyder.

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A weekend non-fiction book review.

Luke Harding. A Very Expensive Poison: The Definitive Story of the Murder of Litvinenko and Russia’s War with the West.  New York, NY: Vintage Books, January 24th 2017. 432 pp.

4 out of 5

Purchase: Amazon

Sometimes facts of history can be more fascinating than any work of fiction.  This is an example of where current events mimics a spy suspense novel of the Cold War era except it is all too real including the fatal consequences.  The author Luke Harding is a British journalist who worked for The Guardian and have spent several years as a foreign correspondent in Russia.  He has written quite a bit about modern Russia including several books on the topic.  I first read his book on Wikileaks which was also intriguing.  This book’s subject matter is even more intriguing than the first.

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